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WOODBROOKE CATALOGUES 

Vol. II 



PUBLISHED FOR THE TRUSTEES OF 
THE WOODBROOKE SETTLEMENT, SELLY OAK, BIRMINGHAM 

BY 

W. HEFFER AND SONS, LIMITED 
CAMBRIDGE 



CATALOGUE 

OF 

THE MINGANA COLLECTION 



OF 



M ANUSCRI PTS 

NOW IN THE POSSESSION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
WOODBROOKE SETTLEMENT, SELLY OAK, BIRMINGHAM 



VOL. II 

CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 

AND 

ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 



BY 

A. MINGANA 



CAMBRIDGE 

W. HEFFER AND SONS, LIMITED 

1936 



Printed in Great Britain 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

Volume I. of the catalogues of the manuscripts in my collection, which appeared in 1933, dealt 
with the Syriac and Garshuni MSS. The present volume, which is the second in the series, 
contains the description of the Christian Arabic MSS. and of additional Syriac MSS. The 
majority of the Christian Arabic MSS. were collected by me in Egypt, the Sinai Peninsula, 
Syria and Mesopotamia, in the course of three journeys which, through the generosity of Mr. 
Edward Cadbury, I was able to undertake in those countries in 1924, 1925 and 1929, while the 
additional Syriac MSS. were acquired since 1933. 

My Arabic collection is fairly extensive, containing as it does both Christian and Islamic 
MSS. and a number of papyri and coins. I had first intended to include the Christian Arabic 
in the Islamic Arabic collection, and describe all the MSS. contained in it in one volume, although 
in separate parts, but on examination the Christian Arabic MSS. appeared to me to be sufficient 
in number and importance to form a special volume by themselves. The description of the 
Islamic Arabic MSS., the number of which exceeds 1600, will, therefore, be given separately in the 
next volume, while a fourth volume will be devoted to the Arabic papyri and coins. A further 
volume will deal with the Greek, Armenian, Ethiopic, Persian, Hebrew and Samaritan MSS. 

Christian Arabic MSS. are unfortunately not very numerous in this country. In fact the 
MSS. described in this volume exceed in number even those contained in the British Museum. 
So far as eastern libraries are concerned, Christian Arabic MSS. are mostly preserved in the 
library of Mount Sinai, 1 the library of the Universite Catholique de S. Joseph at Beirut, 2 the 
Coptic Patriarchal museum and library at Cairo, 3 and the bibliotheque de manuscrits Paul 
Sbath at Aleppo. 4 In the European libraries, the. best collection is that of the Vatican, 6 
followed by that of Paris. 6 Other manuscripts, which are not very numerous, may be found 
in the Arabic catalogues of Berlin, by Ahlwardt ; of the British Museum, by Rieu, Ellis and 
Edwards ; of the Bodleian, by Nicoll and Uri ; of Cambridge, by Browne ; of the John 
Rylands Library, by Mingana ; etc. 

In 1905 Georg Graf wrote a monograph on Christian Arabic literature, wherein he 
mentioned the Christian Arab authors down to the end of the eleventh century. 7 In 1909 
Heinrich Goussen wrote a short treatise on the Christian Arabic literature of the Mozarabs. 8 

1 Studio. Sinaitica, No. Ill : Catalogue of the Arabic MSS. in the Convent of S. Catharine on Mount Sinai, compiled by 
Margaret D. Gibson, 1894; and Studia Sinaitica, No. XII : Forty-One Facsimiles of dated Christian Arabic MSS., by Agnes S. 
Lewis and Margaret D. Gibson, 1907. 

*Al-Machriq VII, 1904 et sqq. (by L. Cheikho) : Les manuscrits arabes de I' Universite" S. foseph, and the same author 
in Melanges de la FaculU Orientate de Beyrouth, and Melanges de I' Universite' S. Joseph (1913-1929). 

3 G. Graf, Catalogue de manuscrits arabes chritiens conserve's au Caire (Studi e Testi, fasc. 63), Citta del Vaticano, 1934, 

pp. x, 319. 

* Bibliotheque de manuscrits Paul Sbath, Cairo, 1928-1934, Vols, I-III. 

8 Scriplorum veterum nova colleclio e Vaticanis codicibus, edita ab Angelo Maio, Romae, 1 831, Tom. IV : Codices Arabici, 
Many Christian Arabic MSS. of the Vatican had been made known before by Assemani, in his Bibliotheca Oricnlalis, 1719. 

• Catalogue des manuscrits arabes de la Bibliotheque Nationale, par le Baron de Slane, Paris, 1883, 1887 (1st part). 
'Die christlich-arabische Literatur bis zur Frankischen Zeit, Freiburg i. Breisgau, 1905 (Strassburger Theologische 

Studien, Band VII, Heft I). _ 

8 Die christlich-arabische Literatur der Mozaraber, Leipzig, 1909 (Beitrage zur christhch-arabischen Literaturgeschichte, 

Heft IV). 



VI 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 



These two monographs have been greatly expanded by Father L. Cheikho in a senes of articles 
in Al-Machriq. 1 The best bibliographical work of earlier times is the catalogue of the Copt 
Arab writer Abu'l-Barakat, published in 1902 by W. Riedel, 2 while many printed texts are 
registered in Sarkis's bibliographical work. 3 

Contrary to the method adopted in Volume I of the catalogues of my collection referred 
to above, the MSS. in the present volume have been classified under subject matter. 

There is no need to emphasise here the importance of all the MSS. described in this 
catalogue. Mention, however, should be made of No. 91, a vellum MS. containing the oldest 
text in any language of the Acta Thomae. It was written about a.d. 830, the earliest date to 
which any Christian Arabic MS. containing other matter than the Bible may be ascribed with 
safety. This is closely followed by No. 43, another vellum MS. containing works by Saint 
Ephrem, and written in an early Christian Kuh hand of about 880. As I stated on page 122, 
these two MSS. appear to contain the earliest translations from Greek into Arabic (in the domain 
of Patristic and Apocryphal literature) that have come down to us in manuscript form. 

Attention may also be drawn to another vellum MS., No. 76, which contains sayings of 
the Fathers of the Desert, with anecdotes about them. 

Another precious MS. is that numbered 41, which, in addition to quotations from Apostolic 
and other early Fathers, exhibits the official correspondence that passed in the early Middle 
Ages between the Patriarchs holding the Sees of Alexandria and Antioch. 

No. 93, which contains an extensive collection of apocryphal Acta Apostolorum, is remarkable 
for the fact that in it St. Paul is called " Ermelus." 

Some MSS. exhibit the oldest texts in existence of their respective works ; as such may be 
mentioned No. 44, which contains the oldest MS. of the works of Paul Rahib, bishop of Sidon. 

One does not usually look for artistic drawings in Christian Arabic MSS., but good 
geometrical patterns may be seen in many of the MSS. of this collection. They are generally 
used to divide the different sections of a work. Fairly handsome representations of the Cross, 
and of birds holding a flower or a fruit in their beak, may also be seen in No. 22, dated a.d. 
1308 ; and rather crude miniatures of some saints are found in No. 45. 

The numbers in square brackets found in the catalogue indicate the series according to which 
the MSS. are arranged on the shelves of the library, while the letter " b " following the number 
of any MS. indicates that there is a MS. bearing the same number in my collection of Arabic 
MSS. in the John Rylands Library, Manchester. 

My sincerest thanks are due to Mr. Edward Cadbury for his encouragement, and for his 
kindness in defraying the cost of the present catalogue. A word of thanks is also due to the 
Aberdeen University Press for the skilful work which they have displayed in this, as in the 

preceding volume of the catalogues. 

A. MINGANA. 



Selly Oak Colleges Library, 
Birmingham, 30/A April, 1936. 



1 These articles were put by the author into book form in 1924, with many additions and corrections, under the title 
Catalogue des manuscrits des auteurs arabes chritiens (Beirut). 

8 Der Katalog der christlichen Schriften in arabischer Sprache von Abu'l-Barakat, Herausgegeben und ubersetzt von Wilhelm 
Riedel. (Nachr. v. d. Kgl. Gesellsch. d. Wis. zu Gottingen, 1902, 635-706.) 

3 Dictionnaire encyclopidique de bibliographic arabe, par J. E: Sarkis, Cairo, 1928. 



CONTENTS 



Introductory Note 

Description of Christian Arabic MSS. 
I. Bible . . . 

II. Psalters .... 

III. Commentaries .... 

IV. Apocrypha . . ... 
V. Prayer-Books and Service Books 

VI. Theology and Theological History 
VII. Mysticism 
VIII. Philosophy 

IX. Science . 
X. History . 

XI. Miscellanea 
Appendix : Catalogue of Syriac MSS. continued from Vol. I 
General Index 

List of the dated and undated MSS. written before a.d. 1798 
Errata in Vol. I. of the Catalogue 



PAGES 
V 

I -1 64 

I-IO 

11-13 

13-22 

23-26 

26-41 

42-100 

101-118 

1 1 8-1 19 

1 1 9-1 20 

121-149 

149-164 

167-190 

193-207 

208 

208 



MINGANA COLLECTION II 

II 
PSALTERS 

7. 

182 x 126 mm. 94 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 

The Psalter and the different hymns and canticles according to the usage of the East Syrian 

Church. 

LJtifll ol^Ulj ^>1>JI ula 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The volume begins with the second half of the 12th Psalm. Many leaves have also dis- 
appeared here and there in the MS. The Psalms end on fol. 77b with the following colophon : 

J L^y c?^ ^jf 5 ^W \ J yy <>-**■-> Q *^- i&* d^b cs^ 1 *J* j?\y ***> «i^" ^ ^rt °-^ 

The following leaves contain hymns and canticles translated from the East Syrian breviary : 

(1) Fol. 78a : The First Song of Moses (Exod. xv. 1-21). Incomplete at the beginning. 

(2) Fol. 78ft : The Song of Isaiah (Is. xxvi, 9-19). Incomplete at the end. 

(3) Ff . 7ga-8oa : A hymn by Narsai, which followed another hymn by St. Ephrem, which is 

missing. Headed : ^i-Jl j J-di 

(4) Ff. Soa-Sia : The Song of the Three Children (Dan. iii.). 

(5) Fol. 81 : The Gloria (Luke ii. 14). Headed : <U\ jT ^ ^UVIj ^UVI ^ fJm Jtir 
Then follow five hymns from the East Syrian breviary, without mention of their authors' 

names. On fol. 84a: begins a hymn attributed to St. Ephrem, as follows : J^rfj a-r^" 1 fii •-$ 
1 #j jU . On fol. 85ft, the hymn of Friday is attributed to John, probably John of Baith- 
Rabban : U^_ ^J J^j <*J-I »# SjCJ . On fol. 87a the hymn to be recited every day is 
attributed to St. Ephrem. On fol. 88 the hymn to be recited for the weeks of Advent, Nativity, 
and for the Commemoration of the Virgin is ascribed to Babai the Great : ^ jLJI aUI J Jtir 
I j (sic) ^jl jU Jj-rj UjuJI jlj"i> ^M-JI . On fol. 89 the hymn to be recited from Nativity 
till Lent" is attributed to Babai bar Nsibnaye : J*~*ft\ ^,1 ^l jU J^" . On fol. 906 the 
hymn to be recited for the four Sundays of the Consecration of the Church is ascribed to George, 
Bishop of Nisibin : ^.—ai U&*\ o4 J *f J ^ *-*->* • ^ n *°* # 9 2 * s * oun ^ *he Nicene Creed, followed 
by three other hymns, the last of which is ascribed to St. Ephrem, in the following terms : 

•(O* ->^ c^-J ' Jf^h c#UJ1 ^ Jtir 
No date. Written in a clear and slightly bold Mesopotamian Naskhi of about a.d. 1400. 
Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Many vowels. Fairly broad margins. Numbers of 
quires in Syriac figures. 

1 The name of St. Ephrem is always written in this way. 

2 These two words are transliterated from the Syriac jj'p* and ),Vr->Qft> (names of two prayers in the East Syrian 
breviary). 



12 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— PSALTERS 

The work is naturally translated from the East Syrian Psalter. The headings of the Psalms 

and the Canons that follow the first verse of every Psalm are also translated from those found in 

the East Syrian Psalter. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 5.] 

8. 

158 x 102 mm. 135 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 1&-1236 : The Psalter according to the Greek Church. 

bj*> i>~^\5 il* y>3 (0^1 <^- iS ^\ *S)\* Jy.J <~>&3 J^~" ^ dj~. ,3-^ J*Z-i *>.} jkM ^~\ $\ *~- 

The volume is divided into seven sahars, beginning with Sunday and ending with Saturday. 
The word Friday is erroneously written for Saturday, and the word Saturday for Friday, on 
if. 950 and 107a respectively. The sahars begin with the ninth Psalm on fol. 6a. 

The Psalms are generally introduced by the word doxa (L£.s) , and at the end of the sahars 
are found the prayers called cathismata (l»J»"l»), followed sometimes by a prayer to the Virgin. 

The Arabic Version is under the influence of the Septuagint and not of the Syriac Peshitta. 
On fol. 1236 is the uncanonical 151st Psalm, attributed to David. The author states that the 
Church has not accepted it because of the pride shown in it by David (4Jr U jjJI tf. r-jU- y>) 

B 

The ten canticles that are generally placed after the Psalms. 

(1) Ff. 1240-1250 : First Song of Moses (Exod. xv. 1-18). 

(2) Ff. 1250-127& : Second Song of Moses (Deut. xxxii. 1-43). 

(3) Ff. 1276-1280 : Song of Hannah (1 Sam. ii. 1-10). The Song is incomplete at the end. 

(4) Ff. 1286-129& : Song of Habakkuk (Hab. iii.). The beginning of this Song is missing, 
together with the Nunc dimittis (Luke ii. 29-32), owing to the fact that fol. 128 is wanting from 
the original MS. and was supplied by a later hand, but left blank. 

(5) Ff. 129&-130& : Song of Isaiah (Is. xxvi. 9-19). 

(6) Fol. 1306 : Song of Jonah (Jon. ii. 1-9). 

(7) Ff. 1310-132& : Song of the Three Children (Dan. iii.). 

(8) Ff. 133&-1340 : The Magnificat (Luke i. 46-55). Called in the MS. the ninth. 

(9) Ff. 1340-1346 : Song of Zacharias (Luke i. 68-79). Call ed in the MS. the tenth. 
Dated (fol. 1346) Tuesday, 17th March, 1103 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1691), and written by the 

Deacon Ignatius, a monk in the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

(sic) %i y, L-l JJJJ1 J^tf-l juJI <sf . . . A fa Jy j JLA\ 4jU! ^\ \i» fc-U j* jWJI J€> 

,y iJjLJI jlSl j& j* yic ~UI lr>til JI4J <o-U cJSj ifj£J\ IL- jyb jj> ^-*lj jj-Li _-.l j-yUcI 

.JLyJi ij*$ \\*r <l, j^, 



MINGANA COLLECTION 13 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red and sometimes in thick black characters. Pro- 
fusely rubricated. Fairly broad margins. One leaf is missing between ff. 29-30. 

On the fly-leaves at the beginning and at the end are Arabic and Garshuni inscriptions by an 
owner, Peter, son of Deacon Shaba. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 2.] 

9. 

157 x 100 mm. 189 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 16-1756 : The Psalter according to the Greek Church. 

The book is divided according to the days of the week, and many Psalms are followed by the 
words doxa (IX) and cathisma (L-jtf). Unlike the preceding MS. No. 8 [2], the present MS. 
does not contain the uncanonical 151st Psalm. 

B 

Ff . 1760-1890 : The ten Canticles that are generally placed after the Psalms. 

•isr 151 ^y^ J#' ^r^ 1 •©*■"* ^ 
The order of these Canticles is similar to that found in MS. No. 8 [2]. A leaf missing 

between ff . 183-184. 

No date. A clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1790. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 56.] 



Ill 
COMMENTARIES 

10. 

314 X 224 mm. 170 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

A 



Ff. 1-196 : The letter of Athanasius of Alexandria to MarceUus, 1 on the Psalms. 

The letter is longer than that ascribed to Athanasius by the Benedictine editors of his works 
and reproduced in Migne's Patrologia. On the very second page of the text, the letter assumes 
in our MS. the tone of a separate treatise on the Psalms. It is headed by the copyist as 
follows : ijj^-VI AjJ* u-^Url ^odl Jy cf V^ U1 ^ 1 > il z/ 1 ' • * 

1 i n Pat. Gr., vol. xxvii., pp. 11-46, this correspondent of Athanasius is called Marcellinus. 



14 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— COMMENTARIES 

Begins: ^ cJL JV Ju»- \jyi\ »Jjt cJ*~ lil ^y u^i-1 WJ r:~~ ^' j 4*-£~Jl ^ : ^y u* i -^ 

Ends: *Lt2i ^aU^*- ^JJI ^Vy* ._ r iJJ JL^bJIj ^Ul <>-»_ ^-j **«■» J' *^~ J»»-b *"•**!' ^-*J J.**.? 

.«ljj> a*»^» J5 (J j*- *^l (i <—^ A 5 * 6 ** ^* p (^" ^*" ^ 0^3 i*& Jo ^J j — alll u^li J~J jl 

In the inscription, as in the heading, the scribe calls the letter a " Commentary on the 
Psalms." 

B 

Ff. 20<z-i70fl : A detailed Commentary on the Psalms, by the above Athanasius of 
Alexandria. 

.ijJOX~>VI ^*laJl iioJl ijjjjaj (J^- 1 ^^ {J**— »Url ~>ji!l U^-3 ^ill AJjta -ls»_jJ»JI _/"^J* _/*— *" <-J^J 

The Commentary is more in harmony with that printed in Pat. Gr., vol. xxvii., pp. 55- 
590, than with the Exposition of the Titles of the Psalms ascribed to him in the same volume, 
pp. 649-1344. 

It may be assumed that the book ascribed to Athanasius by St. Jerome, 1 under the title 
of Liber de Psalmorum Titulis, may refer to the explanation and the motive of every Psalm 
found in the present MS. 

The first Psalm begins : l>^ J ^Ji lj juiUJI ^\j *j: I ^JJI J^-Jl) ^^J* .JjVI jy»j*M 



The last Psalm begins : <j-U)1.5 <$o\Jl _*Jb ^Vl jy»>^ 'J* ..IjJUll .*Ulj jj~J-l -\**J*^ 

o^a^J 4 (^JJl _/*-*^ cil^ili L*l Uaj ry?^\ ***. /**^J j^b ,r»»-sJI ** t£JJI dUill ^ ^JJI Ico L»l IJ> a.» 

This Psalm is followed in the MS. by the uncanonical 151st Psalm, but without any 
commentary by Athanasius. The addition of this Psalm is probably due to a late copyist. 

Dated Wednesday, 27th of the month of Tut, in the year 1513 of the Copts (a.d. 1797), 
the 4th day after the election of the Coptic Patriarch Mark, who was the 108th in the series of 
the Patriarchs of Alexandria. 

Written for the deacon Raphael abu Salamah at-Tukhi, by Ibrahim abii-Tabl b. Sim'an 
al-Khawwanki, a monk in the monastery of St. Mercurius 2 abu Saifain. 



1 De Viris III., c. 87. 

2 Mercurius is also spelt by some writers as Cyrius or Curius, the first syllable being considered as the Syriac Mar for 
" Saint." For the monastery of St. Mercurius see Abu Salih, Churches and Monasteries of Egypt (edit. Evetts, 1895), p. 368. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 15 

jl^VI ij^iU wi <JaJ l yic fctt* SjUJ- uJll U- j ij-uC-VI tfjU» ^ iUlj ^Ul ^5^ Ul djijLJI 
< j>I dUS? ^^l i»y<* *' J-l»b jJL*JI . . . All* ^ Uc Jj-«Jb ,j».a2JI v^ 1 l -^. r* JI ^ • • * 
JJ. _yi r _*l^l" 4)1 &LU- y*\ A*J\ ^\J\ J&\ JMJ3I j^JI ^1 JtUIIj . . . aS> ^ o Arly J*-V 

Abu'l-Barakat (edit. Riedel) mentions in his list of Christian Arabic writings a Commentary 
by Athanasius on the Psalms, and Cheikho 2 asserts that there is no MS. of it in existence, 
while Antonelli refers to Montfaucon, who states that the MS. No. 300 of the Ambrosian 
Library contains an " Arabic version of the Commentary of Athanasius on the Psalms." 8 

Clear, handsome and bold Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

Broad margins. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 59.] 



11. 

377 x 2 59 mm - 2 5 2 leaves. Twenty-five lines to the page. 

The Commentary of 'John Chrysostom on the Gospel of St. Matthew. 

r Ul ^jtfl Jil-JI JV1 c > . . . j^ qjBVl J*-l jrtjft/i jl~*JI fjfr o"^ J^ 1 l M JT* ' • • 

The work is divided into 40 makdlahs (discourses) and 40 '**a/w (homilies or sermons). 
These 40 discourses and 40 homilies run concurrently, one after another, first the discourses 
then the homilies. The discourses deal with a commentary on Matthew, while the homilies 
embrace a variety of spiritual subjects. 

The homilies are headed as follows : — 

(1) Fol. 6a : It is necessary to listen to the commentary upon Holy Writ with care. 

(2) Fol. 10a : We must meditate upon the lessons of the sacred Books with great diligence. 

(3) Fol. 14b : On humility of intention. 

(4) Fol. 236 : We must live a holy life. 

(5) Fol. 31 tf : Nothing will profit us except what we derive from virtue. 

(6) Fol. 37 b : Sorrow pleases God and engenders great joy and spiritual gain. 

(7) Fol. 44a : Those who receive the Communion unworthily do it to their detriment. 

(8) Fol. 496 : On monasticism. 

(9) Fol. 55# : Admonition on the coming of the end. 

(10) Fol. 6ifl : On the existence of penitence, and on endurance in prayer. 

(11) Fol. 67a : On the judgment after death. 



1 Written also in Coptic numerals. 

2 Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chrdtiens, p. 25. 

3 Pat. Gr., xxvii., 602. Three MSS. of this commentary are registered in Graf, Catalogue de Manuscrits, pp. 155 and 218. 



16 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— COMMENTARIES 

(12) Fol. 72a : The Christian is punished more severely than others if he does not lead a 
holy life. 

(13) Fol. 77a : We must test those who speak to us ; and on resurrection, Heaven and Hell. 

(14) Fol. 82b : We must continually remember our sins, and pray God to forgive them. 

(15) Fol. 92a : On virtue. 

(16) Fol. 106b : The works which we consider difficult become easy when we think that we 
perform them for the sake of God. 

(17) Fol. 113a : We must not swear. 

(18) Fol. 1206 : On humility. 

(19) Fol. 129a : We must not curse our enemies ; and on the way we have to stand in 
Church. 

(20) Fol. 136a : Condemnation of the lovers of money. 

(21) Fol. 1406 : We must spend our substance on good works, and on the needy. 

(22) Fol. 145a : We must not desist from prayer because we are sinners. 

(23) Fol. 154a : The remoteness from the Kingdom of Christ is more grievous than the 
torments of Hell. 

(24) Fol. 160a : On the greatness of virtue and the lowness of vice. 

(25) Fol. 164a : On our gratitude to God for His benefits. 

(26) Fol. 171a; : We must not be over-confident that we shall not fall. 

(27) Fol. 177a : We must not spend our time uselessly ; and we must pray for sinners. 
28) Fol. 1826 : A description of the state of sinners ; and a reproof of the lovers of money. 

(29) Fol. 187a : We must not be angry with sinners, but we must rather warn them with 
gentleness. 

(30) Fol. 192a : A teacher must not require virtue from pupils once only, but often and 
gradually. 

(31) Fol. 197a : Reproof of those who weep too much over the dead. 

(32) Fol. 205& : The head of a Church takes the place of the Apostles ; and on the fact that 
a good life is better than thaumaturgy. 

(33) Fol. 213a : We must endure all trials like Job. 

(34) Fol. 219a : It is necessary to subdue our bodies. 

(35) Fol. 224a : On alms and. charity to the poor. 

(36) Fol. 231a : On the just judgment of God. 

(37) Fol. 2366 : We must not go to evil shows, because the wickedness that springs from 
them is great. 

(38) Fol. 242a : The yoke of virtue is easy. 

(39) Fol. 246a : The worship of our Lord is an assurance to us that we are remote from vice. 

(40) Fol. 249a : On the evils that spring from envy. 

Dated 19th of the Coptic month of Babah, in the year 1592 of the Martyrs, which corresponds 
with the 29th of the month of Ramadan of the year 1292 a.h. (a.d. 1875). 

oU & . . . ^1 ^ U^_ ILL. Jy # ^Jl ju ILL, ob jjjfr e j ^ JjVI jjjLl JX, r - 
*5>l :^*A) ttvr <L jttjJi ^Vl >U«d \o^ 5L- -bUI U ^ ^ ^ ^ ^w fj> j, ^ 



MINGANA COLLECTION 17 

The copyist rightly calls this volume part i, as the last verse commented upon is Matt. xii. 20 
(fol. 247a). 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings of discourses in thick green characters, and of homilies 

in thick yellow characters outlined with red. Sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad 

margins. Folios numbered in both Coptic and Arabic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 62.] 

12. 

412 x 292 mm. 270 leaves. Twenty-five lines to the page. 

The Commentary on the Gospel of St. John, by John Chrysostom. 

Like the preceding MS., the work is divided into makalahs (discourses) and 'izahs (homilies). 
There are 88 discourses and 88 homilies. As in the Gospel of St. Matthew, the discourses deal 
with the commentary and the homilies with a variety of spiritual subjects. 

On fol. la is a long inscription to the effect that the present text, which had been translated 
from early times, was carefully compared with the Greek original, by the Greek priest Joseph 
Manna Haddad, by Iwani (John) Papa Ropolus, the secretary of the Greek Patriarch of Antioch, 
and by the Coptic priest Gabriel. They were, however, impeded from carrying out their work 
completely by the massacres of the Christians that took place in Damascus in i860. It is 
further stated that the MS. is in the handwriting of the above priest Joseph Haddad, who was 
eventually martyred in these massacres. 

. . . <JL.J aUUII )aJa J>-V JU Jl 4^a\ Jc ^Aj^\ yl£Jl IA* -U>-l^» O-*^^ 'j** •** J**^ \M* v"^-> 

,3a** <^ji3l <-ZaUS3l <-jjJI J*»j ^UaJVI (j-j^l fJfy^^*) j*^\ j^*jJ1 aIjJ-I U4* «-**£ ts-jy - ' **4*" 

An index to the work is found on ff. ia-6b. 

Clear, handsome and slightly bold Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Fairly broad margins. Three leaves are missing between ff. 132-133. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 63.] 

13. 

294 X 209 mm. 183 leaves. Twenty-three lines to the page. 

The commentary on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Hebrews, by John Chrysostom. 

2 



18 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— COMMENTARIES 

On the title-page (fol. 2a) the name of the author who translated the commentary from Greek 
into Arabic is given as 'Abdallah b. Fadl a. Fath b. 'Abdallah Matran (i.e. bishop) from Antioch, 
who died in a.d. 1052. 

fc) Jl UtijJI fciM p ^ui . . . ^1 ^jj| \± x oulJkJi J&U ^j ,jw,Ai)l j JkJI IL.I jj-J? 

.jl>Jl 4)1 -^ j.1 J^H ^1 451 J^ ^ail ^jl ju-JI ^-Ldlj J>-VI £-JI LyJI 

On ff. 16-20: is the translator's preface, which begins : aLU-I JttJI : ^>_ U Jc J^u v 15"Ua 

.jUiJl 0J4JI ^Ij jl^UI J_l-j j- iUill iw^lj 

The commentary on the verses of the Epistle to the Hebrews are put under the heading 

Makalah (discourse), followed by a spiritual homily of John Chrysostom under the heading 

'Izah (homily or sermon), as in MSS. Nos. H [62], 12 [63]. There are 34 discourses and 34 

homilies. 

The first makalah begins (fol. 56) : ^Jl jc IUI Uji ^ JL" 4II jl "^H 4y ^ JjVI 3 Lull 

.Uill >i^ JU^ ImJLi j\£s &+* <il Ifc- . . . UV! 
The first 'fa* begins (fol. 8a) : li> j* stt . . . <Uti1 ^U.^ SLiJI jU. ^ SjiJI ^ J/VI 3J1 

The translator has added many explanatory notes to the text of St. John Chrysostom. " 
Dated (fol. 183a) the last day of November, a.d. 1735, and written by Shadyak Shukrallah, 
son of the deacon Michael Zandah. 

o-uj J.U- ^Li c _^Ji ^1 4J1 p, j^, ^ ^y, ^, ^ ^ J^LJI y b3l li» UX- ^Sj 

.<^i) ^ <^ * ^ 6j jmtj ^ iu-* J-ii a- Ji# * ^ jbi ^ ^ ^ fJt ^i ^ dtej . . . 

Written in two clear and contemporary Syrian Naskhi hands. The first hand extends from 
fol. 1 to fol. 766 and the second hand from fol. 77a to the end. The second hand is more spaced 
but less handsome than the first. 

Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly 
broad margins. 

On fol. 183& is a note of sale and purchase in a.d. i860, from which the purchaser's name has 
been obliterated. Under it is another note of sale and purchase rendered half illegible, from 
which we gather that on the 3rd July, 1830, the MS. was acquired by the priest Rabbat. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 92.] 

14. 

375 x 276 mm. 283 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 
A commentary on the Psalms, by Daniel of Salah. 

In an inscription on fol. 190a we are informed that the work was translated in 17™ from 
Synac mto Arabic by the monk 'Abd an-Nur Amidi (i.e. of the town of Amed). 

^Vl jyll x* kjJ\ Jl ol^JI &U| ^ ^j ^1 JUL ^dl ^ ^IjJl ^ jui J&\ - 



Jl U>-_£ (t-i.- 1 ^' • • 


. oJ>U— Jl (_>>>- U4»l £jUO*C 




.»^-JI Ai_Jtf» 


jjUl jJSuJI JUb 


JiliJl «~ill <JUj cJls 




. «~» 1 l*J 1 ,..*.fll 



MINGANA COLLECTION 19 

The wording seems to be more in harmony with the Syriac text preserved in the British 
Museum MSS. Nos. 708-710, 1 than with that found in Mingana Syriac 147, ff. gia-i6ia, z where 
a Commentary on the Psalms is attributed to Daniel of Telle, and not of Salah. 

The order of the MS. is as follows : 

A 

Ff. ia-2a : The letter which Daniel of Salah wrote to John, the Abbot of the monastery of 
Marabus (sic), 3 concerning his Commentary on the Psalms. 

JjCjJI JaJI lja>- Jl ._^.ljJl j~JS tf. \3*y m £~JI Jl jLib ^lil <y *iUl AlLJl *Jy» . . . 
yjl Jl^ jUli ^ji-l «j"_y t ljli ^^aJLSII jjO ^Jj (3^ £7^' 

The subscription is : ^c U*.^» ^-.Jill Jt v'^t' aj 

B 

Ff. 2a-28ib : The Commentary on the Psalms. 

As in the British Museum MSS., and in Mingana Syriac 147, this commentary is divided into 
three parts, corresponding with the division of the 150 Psalms into three parts of 50. The first 
part, which begins on fol. 2a, and the third part, which begins on fol. 1906, have no special 
introduction, but the second part, which begins on fol 91a, has a preface in the form of a letter 
addressed to the above John, Abbot of the monastery of Mar Eusebius. This letter begins : 

JjVl J&\ jf\y j^JS cf- «VI Jul jl Jl Iji U* Jl .^j^JUl jUb Ul j-JUl JUI J&\ 1>j2a 

The last verse of the last Psalm is not translated, because it was not found in the Syriac 
text which the translator had before him (fol. 2816) : ^.i-Vl j^jJI y *j^-VI Vjl\ .J> Uj»-.j Ij£* 

C 

Fol. 282 : The epilogue of the author in connection with his Commentary on the Psalms. 

Begins: jCJl ^ <ikj*>- -u»j cJuS^ Ju* Uoj ^*r ^ ^y-ii c*~J* j* ••j^" j-iJl <1Lj 

Dated (fol. 2826) Monday, 26th of the Coptic month Bashnes, of the year 1600 of the Martyrs 
(a.d. 1884), and written in the monastery of the Abbot Paula (Paul), the first hermit, by the monk 
Michael, for Rizk, the father of the teacher George (cf. No. 54 [64]). 

j-jUI JjLJI <>irVl *j» ,j jLxll ^IjJI J-+JSJ ^ y» <£JJi (j-JiJl v^i>s-aJI I!* ^ flydl 0*3 

J^l Vjj IJI jUI j^j. 00 jtfj . . . jl^VI *lj4^JJ \v* <L* <-Lill j^4-i!l tf jJLii _^» ^ j^j-i-Jlj 



1 Catalogue of Syriac MSS. in the British Museum (Wright), vol. ii., pp. 605-606. 

2 Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of MSS., vol. i., pp. 339-340. 

3 This Marabus seems to be a corruption of Mar Euseb (Eusebius), which may be accounted for by the use of the im- 
perfect Arabic characters. The monastery of Mar Euseb was in the district of Apamea. 



20 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— COMMENTARIES 

fj. 6* S& 3 . . . \J y U! jUI j* jUj j^l JJl V ^b r Vl JJW. . . . o-Wl >•! ju Jc c ipi 

.£-1 aJU ^ Uc Jj*\ dUi> ^^ jjUl _yl jjj *^\^\ . . . ^Vi y UJLi 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. 
Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. Half of fol. 10b and all fol. n« are blank, owing to 
a lacuna in the original MS. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 65.] 

15. 

325 x 231 mm. 396 leaves. Generally from twenty-four to twenty-seven lines to the page. 
A commentary on the Gospels, by the priest 'AbdaUah abu '1-Faraj ibn at-Tayib, of Baghdad, 
who died in a.d. 1043. 

v^ 1 C* TlJ s est 1 i)^l er^ 1 C> ^X* ^ u~ ; s> J* *£* ^ ->W j>M *-jVI jjJ* . . . 

The order of the book is as follows : 

A 
Ff. 3&-15& : Introduction to the work. 

Begins: ^JVI fi UI j ^1 l_^> jj 4*1 ^| OJk ^, <j|^| ^^ \^ UiUj ^1 cJulr U 
The subscription is : *» jVI a UJI ojJU cJLT 

B 
Ff . 160-196 : The Ammonian Sections and the Eusebian Canons, to the number of ten. 

.Vjj*- >J-j *-i-j iU^- ^j Wl? 1 -**- o^ <>iy •yiC- W U*^»J 

C 

Ff. 2i#-394« : The text of the four Gospels and the commentary on it. Each Gospel is 
preceded by tables giving the number of the chapters and their contents. 

Ff. 22a-204« : Matthew. Begins : ^ JU . . . jk*J1 ^ioJI ju ^jrfl J_^ J\ ;M . . . 

.j^^iji ^ ^_aji ju C!r ji ^_ ;^ v tT j^TJl 
The subscription is : jJt^Jl fcL l* jjfcjl jk^Jl j^Jl ^ ^ ^j^ 
The number of chapters in Matthew is given as 68, the last of which begins on fol 1966. 
Ff. 204&-232& : Mark. Begins : #\ t J\ ^ J^UI ^Jl ^ . . . ^| ^ ^,^-j, -^ 

.J^jy* J/yi C U?VI . . . 411 Jua ^1 
The subscription is: l^ U* j* JET* ^ ^\ ^] *>-l ^Jl J^JI ^ ^Uu ^ 



MINGANA COLLECTION 21 

The number of chapters is 13, and the author numbers them according to the Syriac version. 
The last of them is on fol. 2310:. 

Ff. 233^-3176 : Luke. Begins : J^y^ ^ ols« • • . 

The subscription is : J\y U-U*l 03^3 ^* ,^3 • • • ,>— M pL-V1 j^I Jj-»J1 V**) »jU« oJuT 

The number of chapters in Luke is given as 22, the last of which begins on fol. 315&. 

Ff. 3i8«-394& : John. Begins : £-—■)' £>-» ^.j ^^f »y»Ua!l il^jJI ^yJJ jXJl J^-JI U»-_y M oU» 

The subscription is : 03j^ ^3 »l AfrJUi olijJl J&JI ^yii! J*CJI J>*-J1 ti^ JjU» cJUS 

.wj>" j^'j j^>*^ ^.^*— *~J j^' W*J^r*" ^-^1 

The number of chapters is 20, the last of which begins on fol. 391a. 

The general subscription to the work is : jU-VI J- J I j\a» »jl ^IDl J-»-lJVI J*l& U»J • • • 
tiVI »yLc l^>^_/»- U-l^l j^»~» <3 jLT <l»-_j (^yiil J^xJI Us-j^j ^ir^JI Is^lj ( _^=^' a*"*-/^ ^jk-aJl ^L» 

Dated (fol. 3946) Wednesday, 5th of the Coptic month of Tubah, of the year 1512 * of the 
Martyrs (a.d. 1796), and written by the priest Malati (i.e. from Melitene) : 

,«Ju-JI vl^JI /oU- ,JaL» .j-*^ ^T*^"^ LfPc-UJ . . . 

On fol. 30, in a long statement within coloured rulings, we are informed that the person 
for whom the MS. was transcribed was the deacon Gabriel Marjan Tuwaisah, of Asyut- 

o±s Ajf jJUl . ♦ . ^UL-VI o-LJI -r 01 ^ u ' v^" 1 c VI :: ^ ly, JtW "**•. r^ 1 ^ 

Clear but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Main headings in thick yellow characters, and 
all sub-headings in red. Ornamental patterns at the beginning of some Gospels, and multi- 
coloured rulings in the form of columns for the Eusebian Canons. Folios numbered in Coptic 
numerals. Marginal references also in Coptic numerals. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 47.] 

16. 

268 x 178 mm. 260 leaves. From twenty-two to thirty-two lines to the page. 

The Commentary on the Gospel according to St. Matthew, by Cornelius a Lapide, who died 
in 1617, translated from Latin into Arabic, in a.d. 171 1, in the town of Aleppo, by the Maronite 
priest Joseph, son of George. 

1 This year is also given in Coptic numerals. 



22 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— COMMENTARIES 

■f* <a-j Ss$ ***3j. J^^l ^-aJI isJT^^ tfy^is C?y 'Jy^y ' ' • *— **^" **.Sy\ J-»-UVI j~~% »-»" 

SL, : ddij $Ul t5 ii-l jjjUl ^^^ <>J <-+*y. a- 5 " *jl*jjl c-jjJI JJU LyJl kill Jl iJLr^ll aaU\ 

Dated (fol. 2606) middle of June, A.D. 1769, and written in Baghdad by Joseph, son of 'Abd 
al-Aziz Kawand. 

y yk\ Jut j. , —*~'y. ii^" 4^ ti^ ^r*^ \ l^ - <^* * J ^ *-^' <j* r^' J*" **.j' - r "~ * f'"- 5 <-^ "** 

iL*^} « a3\ ii- j^_/_J>- <-i-aJ jj J" -WJ . . . al-Xii &»U« -U-JuuJl <~~ix!l /0U-.5 JuC- ^xJylxJI ^jljjJl M J> 

Clear Mesopotamian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

On the fly-leaf at the beginning is the following Syriac inscription in Estrangela characters, 
dated a.d. 1866, and written by Joseph Audo, the Chaldean (East Syrian Uniat) Patriarch : 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 58.] 

17. 

287 x 189 mm. 78 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

A volume containing a commentary on the lessons * for Sundays, Dominical festivals, and 
other commemorations of the ecclesiastical year, according to the calendar of the Greek 
Orthodox Church. 

As the MS. is incomplete at the beginning and at the end, it bears no title and no author's 
name. It appears to me to contain the work of the Greek Patriarch of Antioch, Athanasius 
IV Dabbas, who died in a.d. 1724. See about him, No. 48 [3]. 

The first lesson commented upon is that of Monday of the seventh week after Easter, and 
the last is that of the fourth Saturday in Lent. The missing lessons are therefore those extending 
from the fifth Sunday in Lent to the fifth Sunday after Easter, or seven Sundays out of fifty- 
two. 

The first lesson as it stands in the MS. begins (on fol. la) : <~oUl i*i-l -^ j^'VI .*, *!Lj -*J? 

y J-mJI \j+ j j& jJ^\ 15^1 jl \ySe\ Jut, I .«all ju, 
and the last lesson begins (on fol. 786) : ZaUI 1*1 JS^I .jJI^ -^Jl ^ «|J| c-Jl 3Uj j^Jg 

No date. Written in a clear, bold and handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1730. 
Headings in red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. Slightly damaged by damp. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 17&.] 

1 The lessons mostly deal with Pauline Epistles. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 23 

IV 
APOCRYPHA 

18. 

206 x 156 mm. 15 leaves; Fifteen lines to the page. 

The Arabic text of the Vision of Theophilus, a Syriac version of which I edited and translated 
in the 3rd volume of the Woodbrooke Studies. 

The volume is incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and so bears neither title nor 
colophon. As it stands, it begins : 4)1 J^ Jl U, I^J* \jfy>j J*», *%** \$»&j <jy^\ $) ^*VI £*• 

and ends : >\£j» jj& jl cJ»c*\ ^\ ^jJJl «ilrjJljl a^JI 

This version differs considerably from the Syriac text which I edited from three different 
MSS. in the Woodbrooke Studies. 

No date. Clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi, of about a.d. 1670. Profusely rubricated. Broad 

margins. Some vowels. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 14.] 

19. 

218 x 155 mm. 189 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 10-200- : The Hexaemeron, attributed to St. Epiphanius of Cyprus. 

Begins: J* y>j J^-JI ^juVI JjVl 4N 4jU 

Ends: ^l*. jS> >L* jKj jl^ill iJjtj LjVI ^ j <^ ^ill 

On ff. 36-50: are the names of the different hierarchies of the angels, with their respective 
heads, who are Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, Suriel, Sadakiel, Salatiel, Ananiel. 

On fol. 176 Ezra is quoted to the effect that God weighed the earth with balances. 

In spite of many important variants, this work may be identified with the one preserved in 
Mingana Syr. 460 M. 1 

B 

Ff. 206-360 : The Vision of Gregory concerning the creation. 

.^Jl *£>y<» jvaLw-3 <k^JL-.j jlkjJl <»*».> rr 1 <J ^S 
1 Catalogue of the Mingana Collection, vol. i., p. 821. 



24 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— APOCRYPHA 

Begins: jU ^ ^\yj\ jUil & jk- ^ $ ->UI U» J^ 

Ends: pJ j.y»Ul yo Jl ju^j ^Jl a) .jU ^ ^Ull jUI 

From the above, quotation it is evident that the work is attributed to Gregory Nazianzen. 
This is also done by the author of Mingana Syr. 460 N. 1 In Mingana Syr. 458, however, it is 
said that the vision was seen by Gregory in the mountain of Edessa, 2 from which it appears 
that the Gregory who was in the mind of the first author of this apocryphon was Gregory of 
Cyprus, who, according to the historical notices referring to him, lived in the mountain of 
Edessa before going to Cyprus. See my study on Gregory of Cyprus in the Expositor (1915, 
pp. 365-378). 

The Vision varies in different MSS., and the present text is more or less similar to Mingana 

Syr. 460. 

C 
Ff. $6b-i8ga : The history of Adam and Eve, and of their posterity. 
jX jyS3l oU. J (sic) l*.UUj (J-ja/M <y {sic) Wrj> j» (sic) I4J gj*- \»s \^ ^\ l*a ^£> . . . 

Begins: *\£i\ gJ- $AA jM31 JA Jj\ r> 

Ends: i-\ Aj$h pe-Jlj j^\j *tjfl\ ->^J j^J UlAl lj^ l**>j 

The apocryphon contains a general history of the world, beginning from Adam and Eve 
in the Cave of Treasures, and ending with John the Baptist. Cf . Mingana Syr. 460. O. 8 

No date. Written in a clear and spaced Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1650. Red headings. 
Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. 

Here and there are Coptic words on the margins of the book, and sometimes in the lines of 
the text, written in black or red. 

A note of reading dated 9th of May of the year 1119 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1707) is found at the 
lower edge of fol. 189&, written by the deacon John, son of Elias, known as John As-Sa'idi. 

a \ v^U! o-Ul ^jJU ^ U»- j^i^ s} Jjlt u-U r Vt jjl\ jJI djUl J&\ U» J Jtf 

.ijx^h \\\\ a*- iblJl j\A j& J ^ ^Ju^-Ji u>- 
[Mingana Chr. Arab. I.] 

20. 

211 x 158 mm. 34 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The apocryphal history of the deportation of the Jews to Babylon, at the hand of Nebuchad- 
nezzar, in the time of the prophet Jeremiah. 

dlLJl 0. J* jvJljJ^)! JA *MJ* Jl J-lj**i 45** &f "oj^ r\r*. ***/ cT*"J J^ r ^ ^'. o*^ 

.jv»l \mjt- UJlc L»jl ^^JJl Ojj .igJi bjl (A I ,J y*&£ 

1 Catalogue of the Mingana Collection, vol. i., p. 821. 

2 J&id., p. 814. 

3 /&«*., p. 821. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 25 

In 1927 I published (in the 1st volume of the Wooaorooke Studies) this apocryphon, under 
the shortened title of A Jeremiah Apocryphon. My edition was based on two Garshuni MSS., 
which I gave in facsimile. 

Begins: J-J^-l <y» ._*£$ 4ilJUl liUJ Jy y»\» lS J\ L»jl Jl 4)1 <UT ,Lil$j 

Ends: -xs>c*Jlj ...lac- r-^A ^j\ \y*.~»>5 jl~j »^**ir < j •■*>•_/. ./^ /V c*j. /V.^r^^ < ~* ; *" <j 4P u-*£il -^c-j 

.y ah 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1700. Heading in red. No 
other rubrications. Broad margins. The lower edges of ff. 8-9 are torn away, but the text is 
not damaged. 

Ff . 326-336 are occupied with chronological tables, giving the main dates, from Adam to the 
birth of Christ. These tables were added to the above original MS. by a copyist in a.d. 1846, 
as he counts the year in which he wrote these tables as 1562 of the Martyrs. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 28.] 

21. 

218 x 158 mm. 30 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 

A strange apocryphal work, giving the history of the world, especially of the Jews, from the 
beginning of the Creation to the destruction of Jerusalem. 

The work would probably have extended from post-exilic times to the birth of our Lord, but 
it is incomplete, both at the beginning and at the end. It contains many historical data not 
found in the Bible. I give here the translation of the first and the last sections, as they stand in 
the MS. 

First section : 

" (The children of Lamech) stood at the foot of the mountain, and cried to the children of 
Seth (who were on the mountain) : ' Come down to us/ but the children of Seth said to them 
from the mountain top : ' We do not know the way.' When Ghanun, son of Lamech, heard 
the saying of the children of Seth to the effect that they did not know the way, he thought 
within himself : ' If these do not know the way, how can they come down to us ? ' And 
Satan appeared by night to Ghanun, son of Lamech, and said to him : ' Ghanun, this 
mountain on which they are staying has no path through which they can come down. Say 
therefore to them to-morrow, if they come near you : " Come to the western side of the mountain, 
and you will find there an opening coming down between two mountains, and descend through 
it." ' In the morning Ghanun sounded the trumpets and the timbrels at the foot of the mountain, 
according to habit, and the children of Seth heard them and came down to look at them, 
according to their habit. And Ghanun said to them : ' Come to the western side of the mountain, 
and you will find a path coming down to us.' " 

Last section : 

"As to the copyists who interpreted for them, they corrupted the Books, and the 
Hebrews modified the versions of the Syrians and of the Greeks. They read them and altered 
their letters carefully from the Books, and they were not able to show forth the children of 
the tribes or to name their men and their women and their leaders, except in the case of a few 



26 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

of them. From the destruction of Jerusalem to our day, they have not been able to find a 
single accurate copy (giving genealogies) except in the case of the heads of tribes and in the case 
of the copies that were translated before the destruction of Jerusalem. Since the Books were 
lost to them, they were not able to show how they married ; nor did they know whose daughters 
were their wives, nor their names nor their ancestry ; nor did they even know the computation 
of generations or the genealogy of the priesthood. 

"After Echoniah (Jeconiah?) had been bound in the prison of Babylon for twenty-seven 
years, Marzuk, King of Babylon, released him, and married him to a woman called Dalai, the 
daughter of Joachim, who gave birth to . . ." 

The text begins abruptly : lijJ* Jl l^Jjii l^JLr jVZ L4) \y***+s jJL-l SW jc -U 

and ends also abruptly : ojJy Ji\ x tt.1 JV.> l**-1 l\y,\ (sic) ojHj Jjt liAJU Jjjj* *>-J~\ 

On fol. 10 the author refers to the "first Greek version" oli^JI aLJ\ j v y£. y> U1S3) 

.({sic)W\ 
No date. Written in a bold and clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1700. Every section 
begins with the word JU (he said), in red. Broad margins. Well rubricated. 
Something is missing between ff. 10-n. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 15.] 



V 
PRAYER-BOOKS and SERVICE BOOKS 

22. 

239 x 164 mm. 259 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The Ritual of the Consecration of a new church and a new altar, according to the ritual of 
the Coptic Church. 

The MS. is divided into two columns, the first of which is in Coptic and the second in Arabic, 
as is usual in Coptic MSS. written after the Arab invasion. 

A 

Ff. 4a-20ib : The Ritual of the Consecration of a church. 

Uc ^J^J l^j ^ ^f ljL& Vjl 4-JI Jl w^Jlj itfll Si USJH -^J .IUjJLI i.JI 3J5 

After a prayer by the bishop (ff. $a-%a), come Psalms 122-150 (ff. 86-42^). Psalms 134 
and 135 are considered as one. Fol. 43 contains also the uncanonical 151st Psalm. 
From Fol 44a begin the following Biblical lessons : 
Genesis i.-ii. 4 (ff. 44«-49&) : ^ ^y »b/ 'J» 
Genesis xxviii. 10-22 (ff. 496-520) : ^1 ^ y ;\ Jy - ^ ^\ ^ [^ 






MINGANA COLLECTION 27 

Exodus xxv. 1-40 (ff. 520-630) : ^jj~\ Ju> y J-aJ 
Exodus xxx. 17 — xxxi. 11 (ff. 630-676) : <J\ <J»-t y rjj-l J» Cf 
Exodus xxxix. 43 — xl. 38 (ff. 676-720) : U)l J>.l ^ rjjLl >- ^ 
Numbers iv. 1-16 (ff. 720-760) : ^1 ^^J U^VI >- ^ 
Numbers iv. 17-26 (ff. 760-786) : ^ill ^^J ^ju)I _/u- j* 

Joshua iii. 7 — iv. 9 (ff . 786-826) : jy ^ I jyu j* 

2 Samuel vi. 1-20 (ff. 826-866). Called in the MS. " from the second book of Kings " : 

.Jttl i)>Jl > ^ 
1 Chronicles xv. 2 — xvi. 37 (ff. 866-950). Called in the MS. " from the second book of 
Kings " : J\&\ AJJ\ >- # 

1 Chronicles xxviii. 2 — xxix. 22 (ff. 950-1036). Called in the MS. " from the Paralipo- 
mena " : jyJI o*>Cai ^ 

2 Chronicles iii. 1 — vi. 11 (ff. 1040-1140). Called in the MS. " from the Paralipomena." 
Quoted with omissions and changes : dyUI cj%u* ^ 

2 Chronicles v. 2 — vi. 5 (ff. 1146-1176). Called in the MS. " from 3 Kings." Quoted with 
omissions and changes : £!bl <£LJI ^ 

2 Chronicles vi. 12 — vii. 16 (ff. 1 176-1270). Said in the MS. to be taken " from the book 
of Baryamin " '» &\ji J* & 

2 Chronicles vi. 12 — vii. 16 (ff. 1270-1376). Said in the MS. to be taken " from 3 Kings " : 

.JUi J>JI > # 

Isaiah lix. 20 — lx. 21 (ff. 1380-1420) : iS J\ L-^l ^ J** 

Ezekiel i. 3-28 (ff. 1420-1470) : ^1 Jlij>- ^ J** 

Ezekiel xl. 1-19 (ff. 1470-1506) : cJI U J>-l # ^JJI JUIj»- j* J-ai 

Ezekiel xlii. 16 — xliv. 5 (ff. 1506-1580) : ^ill Jlij*- ^ Ulj 

Revelation xxi. 1 — xxii. 5 (ff. 1580-1630) : ^Ji^VI U^_y_ \»jj y, J^J 

Ff. 1636-1640 are occupied with some prayers recited by the priests, headed as follows : 
•@}J\ <y*^ ^ *VV" •**. **$\ $Js ->y*^\ gjj ^y ^-^b *m$\) wii-VI u& JyA\ .A* c*J lil 3 

From fol. 1646 the Biblical lessons are continued, as follows : 

Hebrews vii. 26— ix. 1 (ff. 1646-1676) : ^1^1 j* (J JL+y\ \ji ^ ^J^JI ;■*-, JU- II* -u j* 

James ii. 14-23 (ff. 1676-1686) : y ^» a)L_> j. 

Acts vii. 44-55 (ff. 1686-1706) : ^^.Vl 

After this come the prayer of the Gospel, and the four " testimonies " from Psalm 67 
(ff. 1706-1710) : jyJ\ 3 gUI j r> J! ^ |^ cJ VI \js i jiVI ^U Jyi Ii* ju, 

These are followed by further Biblical lessons : 

Matthew xvii. 1-5 (fol. 171) : jl> jj.\ ^ J^i 



28 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

Mark ix. 2-7 (ff. 171&-172&) : \jij> J^l ^ 
Luke ix. 28-36 (ff. 172&-1740) : U J J.^1 ^ 
John x. 22-42 (ff. 1740-176&) : \^ y _ jj\ ^ 

Ff. 176&-201& are occupied with rubrics and prayers to be recited by the bishop, the arch- 
deacon, the deacon and the congregation. The first rubric begins (fol. 1766) : hftj\ jUr II* ju» 

.■M j_piJi «>\^» «J^.j jy^Ji /*jl3 «— <a-»vi «— **j ajuvij AcLi-ij (j^yi*-^ *-i»vij 

B 

Ff. 204-2556 : The Ritual of the Consecration of the Altar. 

The ritual consists of the recitation of some Psalms and many prayers by the bishop, the 
archdeacon and the deacon, followed by some lessons from the Pauline Epistles, the Catholic 
Epistles and the Gospels. 

Ff. 2560-2576 contain a long colophon in which we are informed that the MS. was written 
by a priest-monk in the monastery of St. George of Tura, on Thursday, the 5th of the month of 
Hatiir, in the year 1024 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1308), in the time of John (spelt Yowannes), the 
Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria : 

v Vl h>- ^ ^Ufll yjs ybS" y* tfJJI £.U1 jftdl LU jlT. . . ^jdl ^Jlj ^yij V V1 ^ 
^asII ^4, . . . *juJ\ JL.ll jjil Ij/Sij . . . ijjulCVI -JjJ. ijJj. V 1 ^A 11 4 rr ui • • • ^ Ul 
^jlj sJI <L. ^ j^> ^ ^ ^li-l ^^J-l f _y_ ^ \j, J* j 4)1 ^ f ^ j*T. . . 1 J. ^^ jU 

.y jl^VI IJ4^1I aj 4^ 

On fol. 2030 is an inscription in Arabic by the Coptic Patriarch Cyril, presenting the MS. 
to John, Bishop of Salisbury, on the 4th of the rnonth of Baba, of the year 1615 of the Martyrs 
(a.d. 1899). Below the inscription is the seal of the Patriarch, dated 1613, 1 probably of the 
Martyrs (a.d. 1897). On the opposite page (fol. 2026) a similar statement is found in English. 

On fol. 8a is a not very clear note -in which it is stated that the MS. came into the possession 
of a spiritual son of the above-mentioned Patriarch John (spelt Yowannes), who was also 
called John (spelt Yuhanna, ti^_). 

On fol. 2556 is an inscription by the son of the last John, who was called Farj-AUah, 
who gave the MS. as wakf to a man whose name has been partly obliterated and cannot be 
deciphered with safety. 

Fol. 36 is occupied with a representation of the Cross in black, yellow and red, and on the 
margins of many leaves is a representation of a bird holding a flower or a fruit in its beak. 
Many geometrical patterns are also found before the main divisions of the work. The pattern 
on fol. 2036 fills the whole page. 

The Coptic part of the MS. is written in a bold and clear hand, and the Arabic part in a 

1 Apparently the date of the making of the seal. 






MINGANA COLLECTION 29 

handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. The first Coptic words of a new section are in 

thick black characters. 

The rubrics, unlike those found in MS. No. 24 [9] (which are only in Arabic) are in both 

Coptic and Arabic. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 61.] 
[Coptic- Arabic 2.] 

23. 

154 x no mm. 130 leaves. Eleven lines to the page. 
The prayer-book of the Coptic Church, as follows : 

Ff. 10-370 : The prayers called UlkJI , to the number of 50, with the enumeration of the 
days on which they are to be recited. 

ju-J-l Al ^i-U i.J-l_5 »Uj^l J**u«4 Jad\ *li J.? -Lo2Jl oLL-JI j I^ImJ^I ^ <5jL» <S\> . . . 

Ff. syb-6yb : The prayers called UJ» , and the days on which they are to be recited. The 
first is headed : *\*J\ *Usil Jl i f\Ld\ ^ J^^lj 1 UUI .a*j 

Ff. 68&-116& : Various prayers, many of which are from the Book of Psalms, to be 
recited on different occasions. The first begins (fol. 68a) : j jl ( y^ ^ jlS" lil jUVI U^i; 2%0 

,<ac. *-yu JU 4" 0« ->'./ *-^ ****» 

The last (ff. 97-116&) is to the Archangel Michael, and is headed : Jl *ja> ^ SjL Ul» 

Ff. 116&-130& : Various short prayers, or ejaculations, for all the days of the months of the 
Coptic year. 

Incomplete at the end. The last ejaculation is for the 16th day of the month Bawunah. 

No date. Written in a clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1780. 
Headings in red. "Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. Leaves numbered in Coptic 
numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 746.] 

24. 

234 x 162 mm. 237 leaves. Generally from thirteen to fifteen lines to the page. 
Ff. 50-1570 : The Khulaji (Euchologion), or the Liturgy of St. Basil, according to the Coptic 
Monophysite Church. 

f\j <jlc ;>U j oUl a*lfll Jc ^ U ^y .u-jJL-l ^-JlSII j-U £*}& ^y- Jtf '. . . 

The MS. is divided into two columns, the first of which is in Coptic and the second in Arabic, 
as is customary with Coptic liturgical books. All the rubrics are in Arabic. 



30 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

The Liturgy is complete, and begins with the preliminary matter dealing with the Mass, 
and ends with the Dismissal. It contains both the part recited by the deacon and that 
recited by the priest. 

On ff. 1556-1566 the Arabic part has not been added in the second column. 

Dated (ff. 156&-1570) 14th of the Coptic month of Bashnes, of the year 1590 x of the 
Martyrs (a.d. 1874), and written by Farah, son of Masihah, a monk of the monastery of the 
Virgin, in the town of Babylon, 2 for the deacon Ibrahim, son of Khalil, who has written his 
name at the bottom of fol. 1570 : 

<yply»M j£.5 .r-)-d\ d£\* t£J^ j& (*U- i**~~* y>\ rj j&~\ *Jl»^\ o^VI (sic) II* JSlij 
.j-LJl . . . ASU j* Uc O^-aJlj j\^y\ JJL^dl \o\* <L- {J JJ* j4^ ja jU. joIJI *)JI iljUl vjl^Jl ij* 

The Coptic part is in clear, bold characters, and the Arabic part in a clear but not hand- 
some Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Ff. 1576-2376 at the end are 
blank. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 9.] 
[Coptic- Arabic 1.] 

25. 

128 x 85 mm. 215 leaves. Ten lines to the page. The supplied leaves have a varying 
number of lines. 

The complete book of prayers of the Greek Uniate Church. 

l%*3 SpO^/d' »!A-»J olcLJlj IjHjJ J-OI »_i-aj 1"%* t5 icl O^JI ol^-aH (J*-?^* ^->^' ^ccl^-JI <_jlo 

.^Ulj j»lft) <UjV ^>! ^^ J*~3 fjl\ 

The prayers may be divided into the following main sections : 

(1) Ff. 16-340 : The prayers of midnight for all the ferial days. 

(2) Ff. 346-440 : The morning prayers. 

(3) Ff . 446-526 : The various Tasdbih, in eight tunes. 

(4) Ff . 800-1706 : The Horologium, or the prayers of the Hours, from Hour 1 to the prayers 
to be recited before going to bed, as follows : 

(0) Ff. 860-936 : Prime. 
(6) Ff . 940-1056 : Terce. 

(c) Ff. 1060-1096 : Sext. 

(d) Ff. 1096-1160 : The prayers under the title Makarismi = ^jjlSCJl (jjuucapurpoi) . 

(e) Ff. 1 166-1250 : None. 
(/) Ff . 1256- 1450 : Vespers. 
(g) Ff. 1456-1706 : Nocturns. 

(5) Ff. 1760-2026 : The prayers under the title Metalepsis = ^^JlkJl jyU (/AeraA^^t?) . 

1 Written also in Coptic numerals. 

2 The Egyptian town of Babylon, about which see Abu Salih, Churches and Monasteries of Egypt, p. 72. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 31 

(6) Ff. 2030-2130 : The prayers to the Virgin, which should not be recited while sitting 
(dKodlaroi), under the title: ^ j-yJLl o ^ V ^JJ! J j^j-ISVI «o- <*js~ ^sj : j^j&VI 

.4WI Zollj UtjuJ 

(7) Ff. 213&-2150 : A calendar in the form of tables, for the principal feasts and com- 
memorations of the Greek Uniate Church : -LJUS3I aUVI jljjjf 

Dated (fol. 1450) Thursday, 13th June, of the year 7046 of the creation (a.d. 1538). 

Clear and fairly bold Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Red rulings. 
Fairly broad margins. 

Ff. 27, 52-54, 74, 156, and 171-215 are supplied by a later hand. 

Geometrical ornaments in different colours, mainly blue, red and yellow, separate the 
chief sections. 

On fol. 10 is a seal of the library of a literary society of Horns or Hims, with the date 1896, 
similar to those found in MS. No. 95 [88]. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 89.] 

26. 

195 x 141 mm. 108 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The Octoechus of the Greek Church, attributed on the title-page and on fol. lb to St. John 
of Damascus, or Joannes Damascenus. 

Headed : Jjj-Wb ^h ^X-LSVl *A> <y^jJl ^J\ \3*- x jf JfrUII UJl" ^JftS J& 

.£*A)I jyU> <,UI 

From this heading it appears that the Octoechus was followed by the Exaposteilaria and 
other canonical prayers, but as the MS. is incomplete at the end, the work ends about the middle 
of the 7th tune. 

The beginning of the book, on fol. 16, is : jf JiUll ^iJlr jUl ll£ <iiy Cr ». 5 4JI j^ ^jd 

The 1st tune, fol. 16 : i-l c~J\ c&© .JjVI j^All 

In the morning prayer of Sunday, a sentence in Greek characters is used on fol. 40. 
The 2nd tune, fol. 236. 

Something is missing between ff . 36-37, and because of this lacuna, the beginning of the 
third tune is missing. 

The 4th tune, fol. 50a. 

The 5th tune, fol. 686. 

The 6th tune, fol. 86b. 

The edges of fol. 99 have disappeared, and are covered over with blank paper. 

Something is missing between ff. 101-102, with the consequent disappearance of the beginning 
of the 7th tune. 



32 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

No date. Written in a clear, spaced and bold Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1650. Headings 
in thick black characters, generally accompanied by geometrical patterns, and sub-headings in 
red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins, some of which renovated by a binder. 

On the title-page are notes of reading by a boy, Nicholas Murad, son of Michael Kishk, when 
he was twelve years old. In these notes the work is called ^>JI , i.e. Paracleticon. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 117.] 

27. 

109 x 78 mm. 149 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 

A prayer-book and synaxarium according to the Greek Uniate Church. 

^)\ ^Jfr ^*- ° 1 > un ^ 
This book, apart from some titles of prayers, seems to be different from No. 25 PK)]- 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

A 

Ff . 401-22 6 : The midnight prayers for Sundays. 

.auyi ^ jjJi _i^ :%* 

Under this heading are included : 

(a) The Song of Moses (fol. 14a). 

(6) The Song of Hannah, the mother of Samuel (fol. 146). 

(c) The Song of the prophet Habakkuk (fol. 156). 

(d) The Song of the prophet Isaiah (fol. 16a). 

(e) The Song of the prophet Jonah (fol. 166). 
(/) The Song of the Three Children (fol. 17b). 

Ff . 226-606 : The Hours and other prayers, as follows : 

Fol. 226 : Prime. 

Fol. 266 : Terce. 

Fol. 290 : Sext. 

Fol. 330 : The prayers under the title Makdrismi (fiaKa/>icr/ioi). 

Ff . 366-380 : Prayers before and after a meal. 

Fol. 38 : None. 

Fol. 416 : Vespers. 

Ff . 45a and 60a : First and second Nocturns. 

B 

Ff 620-1046 : The synaxarium of the Greek Church and various prayers for the principal 
saints whose commemoration falls on a given day : 

The subscription is : $\ I? dy. • m f*\z>d\ c~" 

The synaxarium is divided, as usual, into months and days. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 33 



Ff. 1046-1496 : The prayers known as cXj\}J* and JfcatiS 

The first is headed : m\J\ j»J!ij JIjuS 

The names of Fathers to whom prayers are attributed are the following : 

Fol. 26 : Euphistrathius (sic) (t^lj^il) 

Ff. 320, 40&, 51a, 138a;, 1450 : Basil of Caesarea. 

Fol. 560 : St. Ephrem. 

Fol. 56a : Paul the Hermit. 

Fol. 58a : The monk Antiochus. 

Ff. 1400, i486, 1496 : John Chrysostom. 

Ff. 142a, 143a : Simon the Recluse. 

Fol. 144& : St. John of Damascus (Johannes Damascenus). 

Fol. 1456 : Simon the Theologian. 

No date. Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1750. Headings in red. 
Profusely rubricated. 

Something is missing between ff. 18-19, 66-67, 74-75, 94-95, 113-114, 143-144, and the edges 
of ff. 1 and 28 have partly disappeared. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 106b.] 

28. 

122 x 90 mm. 146 leaves. Generally twelve lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 10-360 : A prayer-book of the modern Greek Uniate Church. Incomplete at the 
beginning. 

The book follows the calendar of the ecclesiastical year of the above Church. 

The main titles of prayers found in the work are : (0) \j\)J» , (b) j>jl**j£j\! , (c) J\jji , 

The work contains also a short synaxarium of the Church. Some prayers are translated 
from Latin. 

B 

Ff. 366-1386 : Various prayers for the use of the modern Greek Uniates. 
The first begins (fol. 366) : l^Ui 8*jJI (J M\ l<* jxz :AJ) U»l* ; and the last is the Litany 
of the Virgin. 

Something is missing between ff. 138-139. 

C 

Ff. 1390-1460 : A treatise on chronology and astronomy, mostly dealing with the Syrian, 
Arabian and Coptic months. 

The first heading is : ^.L^-j **£j\y) ?))\ j^P Sj*» 

3 



34 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

D 

Fol. 146b contains the continuation of the prayer-book and synaxarium of the aforesaid 
Church. Incomplete at the end. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi of about 1760. Headings in 

red. Profusely rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 35.] 

29. 

103 x 77 mm. 88 leaves. Generally from eleven to thirteen lines to the page. 
The Horologion or Book of the Hours of the Greek Uniate Church. 

No date. Written in a clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1780. Coarse geometrical patterns 
divide the main headings. Ff. 39-45 are supplied by a later hand. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 46.] ! 



30. 

154 x 112 mm. 28 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

The Communion Service according to the Greek Uniate Church, entitled : Metalepsis 

(/XCTaAl^l?) . 

Dated (fol. 28a) Saturday, 27th November, a.d. 1828, and written by the priest Ilyas 
Sakilarius, in Suez, for his son Antony. 

From an inscription at the bottom of fol. 28a, we learn that the book passed into the 
possession of the priest Antony, son of the priest Ilyas (probably the son of the preceding), on the 
17th December, 1852. 

On fol. 286 another inscription by Nicholas, son of the preceding Antony, informs us that 
he owned the book. on the 15th January, 1872. The same Nicholas has stamped his seal three 
times underneath his inscription. 

Another half-obliterated inscription, dated also the 15th January, 1872, is found on fol. la. 

The work contains prayers by John Chrysostom, Basil of Caesarea, Simon the Recluse, and 
John of Damascus. 

Clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 41.] 



MINGANA COLLECTION 35 

31. 

no x 79 mm. 187 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 
The prayer-book of the Greek Uniate Church. 

Incomplete at the beginning. 

All the section included between ff. 856-1280:, and containing a complete calendar and 
synaxarium, is missing in some MSS. such as No. 25 [89]. 

This section of the synaxarium ends with the following colophon: Jlr <i r , Sy>LJ| o~ 

Further, the rubrications of both MSS. are not always identical, and there is also a con- 
siderable number of variants in the phraseology of the two texts. 

Dated (fol. 181&) Wednesday, 28th of January, 1831, 1 and written by the priest Andrew, son 
of George, from the village of Gabriel of the district of 'Akkar, near Tripoli (of Syria), for David, 
son of 'Isa Hulu. 

•^^r*** M'H *-^'j ( s * c ) O^k? t>*M»*j j*- I j 

Ff. 1830-1870 contain by a later hand additional prayers for dominical festivals. 
On ff. 177-181* there is an ecclesiastical calendar from a.m. 7339 and a.d. 1831 to a.m. 7359 
and a.d. 1851. 

Clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters, and sub- 
headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

Something is missing between ff. 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 181-182. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 107.] 

32. 

332 x 238 mm. 250 leaves of two columns. Twenty-seven lines to the column. 
The Menologion and Euchologion of the Greek Church. 

•a$JI ,jJb ■•«*>■ JwUJl ijla 

Every day of the month is dedicated to one or more saints, to whom different prayers, gener- 
ally sung to different tunes, are addressed. 

The MS. is incomplete, as it begins with the 3rd February (fol. 10), the beginning of which is 
missing, and ends with the 31st August. 

I give below the names of the saints for February and March : 2 

1 As seen in the Arabic colophon given below, the copyist gives in writing two hundred instead of eight hundred, which 
is the right number exhibited in the date in figures. 

* The names of saints which are not familiar will be transliterated. 



36 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 



4th February 
5th 



6th „ 
7th „ 
8th „ 
9th 

ioth 

nth 

I2th 

I3th 

14th 

15th 

16th „ 

17th 

18th „ 

19th 
20th 
21st 
22nd „ 

23rd 

24th 

25th 

26th „ 

27th 

28th 

29th 

1st March. 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 
ioth 
nth 
12th 
13th 
14th 
15th 
16th 



St. Isidore al-Farami. 

St. Agatha. 

St. Phoculus, bishop of Smyrna. 

St. Parthenius, bishop of Lampsakon in Hellespont. 

SS. Theodore the General, and Zacharias the Prophet. 

St. Nicephorus. 

St. Charalampius the Thaumaturge. 

St. Gelasius, bishop of Sebaste. 

St. Meletius of Antioch. 

St. Martinianus. 

St. Aphcasantius. 

St. Onesimus. 

St. Pamphilius, martyr. 

St. Theodorus the tiro, martyr. 

St. Leontius of Rome, Pope. 

St. Archippus the Apostle. 

St. Leontius of Coutances. Addressed also as Leo. 

St. Timotheus al-Anasimpoli. 

The discovery of the relics of martyrs. 

St. Poly carp of Smyrna. 

The finding of the head of St. John the Baptist. 

St. Tarasius, archbishop of Constantinople. 

St. Porphyrius, bishop of Gaza. 

St. Procopius al-Banyasi. 

St. Basil the Confessor, who became a monk with St. Procopius. 

St. Cassianus. 
St. Aphadocia (a nun). 

SS. Theodotus the martyr, bishop of Cyrenia, and Euchesius the martyr. 
SS. Apotropius, Callinicus and Basiliscus, martyrs. 
St. Gerasimus of the Jordan. 
St. Conon, martyr. 
The forty-two martyrs. 
SS. Basileus, bishop of Sharsuna, and Ephrem, Capitonus, Eugenius, Eutharius, 

and their companions, martyrs. 
St. Theophilactus, bishop of Nicomedia. 
The forty martyrs of Sebaste. 
St. Quadratus the martyr, and his companions. 
St. Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem. 

St. Theophanes the Severan, or follower of Severus (seferyani). 
The translation of the relics of Nicephorus, Patriarch of Constantinople. 
SS. Benedictus the monk, and Alexander the martyr. 
St. Agapius and his six fellow-martyrs. 
St. Sabinus the martyr. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



37 



17th March. St. Alexius, the man of God. 



18th „ St. Cyril of Jerusalem. 

19th „ SS. Chrysanthus and Daria (martyrs). 

20th „ The Fathers killed in the monastery of St. Saba. 

21st „ St. Jacob, bishop and confessor. 

22nd „ St. Basilius of Angora, priest and martyr. 

23rd „ St. Nikon and his 200 fellow-martyrs. 

24th „ Eve of the Annunciation, and Zacharias the Prophet. 

25th „ Annunciation of the Virgin. 

26th „ The Archangel Gabriel. 

27th „ St.'Matrona (the woman martyr) who was from Salonika. 

28th „ St. Hilarion the younger. 

29th „ St. Mark, bishop of Arethusa, martyr, the deacon Cyril, and their companions ; 

and the martyrs Jonas and Parachisius. 
30th „ St. John Climacus. 

31st „ St. Hypatius the Thaumaturge, bishop of Gangra. 

Ff. 243^-248 6 are occupied with the service of unnamed saints who have no special service 
in the ecclesiastical year. Such saints may be apostles, prophets, martyrs, bishops, etc. 



^ v_ikj yt£ll IJj» Ja-J j <>M- ^j J^g V ^jj| Ju-Ji)| .j£. 



*5j 



<U.» 



.a»-lj dyj IaM- dUS Jjl ,»j>.\ 



J.U 



U4A 



Dated (fol. 243a) 5th April, a.d. 1839, an d written by the Greek Orthodox copyist, Nicholas, 
son of Joseph Jabbar, from Damascus. 



£pfttf J A** 



.JJI jL-5 



**- <y y* ^ OH j& ,y u~*^ r* 51 J 4jUi v b3i li* k-U ^ jUdi tf } 

.UjU tr 54yjVI %*\ ^fi^AjW jl>- w*-ji jJj Vyti ^ilj dUl jil ju -Law* uJlj ll&j 

Five leaves are missing between ff. 239-240. 

Clear, slightly bold, but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in thick 'black 
characters. All sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Very broad margins. 

A note of ownership is found on fol. 248ft, to the effect that Job Dahdal bought the MS. 



for himself and his children. 



[Mingana Chr. Arab. 96.] 



33. 

169 x 107 mm. 98 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 
Another prayer-book of the Greek Uniate Church. 

The main sections of the book are : — 
Ff. 40,-190. : Morning prayers. 
Ff. 196-310: : Prayers of the Mass. 



JUJI 



-b; U <*\f. . . 



38 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SERVICE BOOKS 

Ff. ^ib-^Sa : Evening prayers. 

Ff. 386-946 : Prayers to be recited at different dominical festivals. 

The main headings of the last section are : — 

Fol. 520 : .l*fc <iJl jIju ^c- Lr -*ljVl \^*J ~**j»* rf* 

Fol. 72a : tS &$ji\ ^^" 

A feature of the present MS. is that about one-third of the prayers found in it are in Greek 
transliterated in Arabic characters. 

Dated (fol. 946) Thursday, the end of September, a.d. 1843, and written by the priest Joseph 
Rabahiyah. 

,<U>-lj ^_jL-<y i$-)y~\ aLJI Jto-\ 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters. Sub-headings in red. 

Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 112.] 

34. 

226 x 160 mm. 80 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

A MS. containing the Liturgies of SS. John Chrysostom and Basil of Csesarea, the TrpoTjyiaor/z&a. 
or the Mass of the pre-sanctifled Elements, of Gregory Nazienzen, the fxerdX-qifjis, or prayer for 
the partaking of the Holy Communion, and some other prayers, together with a Synaxarium 
according to the Greek Church. 

A 

Ff. 46-110 : The Evensong and the Vigils (aypvnvla). 



B 

Ff. 116-180 : The Matins. 



.cjLLjcVI oiyi-» 



.A^^pt— J I »»L-aJi <*Jk>- i^~ZS 



Ff . 180-230 • The prehminary matter dealing with the Liturgy and with the vestments and 
the preparation of the Elements on the altar of a Cathedral Church. 

D 

Ff. 236-380; : The Liturgy of St. Chrysostom. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 39 

E 
Ff. 386-506 : The Liturgy of St. Basil. 

F 
Ff. 510-586 : The irpo-qyiaaixiva, or Mass of the pre-sanctified Elements. 

•^Vl k**j3S J.UI J liL-U^JI j-IjuI 

G 
Ff . 590-736 : The prayers of the /xeTaA^is. 

The above treatises constitute the original MS. The items that follow are by later hands. 

H 

Ff. 740-766 : The calendar of the saints for each day of the year, according to the Greek 
Church. 

.fijl ^JJ* jljub 

The leaves which contain this section have been inserted from another MS. 

I 

Ff. 770-796 : Several prayers for a sick man. 

The same hand which wrote the above prayers has also written another prayer on ff. 16-26, 
for a sick man who is sleepless. 

Dated (fol. 736) 16th November, a.d. 1857, an( * written by the priest Joseph Rabahiyah 
of Horns, who states that in that year he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem. 

<-»AaJl J51-VI O^jJi <-T0 j& OjJJuJi ii-Jl j.} .<.».—* ^AOV &-> . . . UL.J ^--f <-»-lj *-+*£ t5->J^ 

Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Black rulings. Broad margins. Geometrical diagrams divide the main sections of the work. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 97.] 

35. 

145 x 84 mm. 98 leaves. Nine lines to the page. 

A prayer-book for the use of the modern Greek Uniates. Many prayers are translated 
from Latin. 

Dated (fol. 986) 5th of September, a.d. 1865, and written by Ilyas Zaidan, from Damascus, 
.i-l ^A*\o <i- jyj o J \jlj4 ^Ul jUj (/Ul <lto jJLr tfjUl JUl^JI »o» 



4 o CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-SERVICE BOOKS 

A clear Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. A few main headings in thick black characters. 

Profusely rubricated. Red rulings. Fairly broad margins. 

J [Mmgana Chr. Arab. 39.] 



36. 

66 x 47 mm. 78 leaves. Generally fourteen lines to the page. 
Another prayer-book of the Greek Uniate Church. 

Ff . 1-376 : Morning prayers and the Hours. 

Ff . 376-480 : An ecclesiastical calendar and synaxarium divided into months, together 
with the prayers to be recited on the days of the principal saints of the month. 

The remaining part of the MS. contains different prayers, especially the Metalepsis 

(pfrttts^ts) on ff. 606-766. 

Ff. 776-780 contain an ecclesiastical calendar embracing the years between a.m. 7374, or 

a.d. 1866, and a.m. 7378, or a.d. 1870. 

Dated (fol. 78a) 15th of April, a.d. 1866, and written in the village of Brno, near Tripoli, 
by the priest Michael, son of Abraham. 

Clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters, and sub- 
headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

Something is missing between ff . 22-23. 

[Mmgana Chr. Arab. 113.] 



37. 

171 x 106 mm. 79 leaves. Generally twelve lines to the page. 

The Office of the Hours, or the Horologion, of the Greek Uniate Church. 

£j\ %b* 4*~*JI ic- (J««JLir i&.jG- ***>•' r e **~*', ••• (3-^*^ . • • 

Dated (fol. 786) Wednesday, the 14th August, 1895, and written by Faraj George. 

A scrawling and negligent Syrian Naskhi. European paper. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 42.] 



MINGANA COLLECTION 41 

38. 

150 x 96 mm. 247 leaves. Generally from twelve to thirteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. i-23# : A Calendar according to the Latin Church. 

.<JUjJI <~J53l ioU Jc uJI lj\i ^Lcl 

B 

Ff. 2$b-24a are blank. 

Ff . 24^-247^ : The Office of the Virgin, according to the Roman Catholic Church. 

From an inscription on fol. la we infer that the author was a Jesuit called Habib : 

Fol. 2456 contains some chronological notes, from which we learn that the author composed 
his work in a.d. 1696, corresponding with a.h. 1107, and that when he composed it he was forty- 
one years of age. 

The MS. is therefore an autograph of the above Jesuit Habib. 

A clear Syrian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in 
red. Well rubricated. Pages numbered in European Arabic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 57.] 

39. 

126 x 70 mm. 102 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 
A prayer-book for the use of Roman Catholics in general. 

No date. A clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi of about 1800. Ff. 73-89 are by a 
later hand. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 44.] 



42 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

VI 
THEOLOGY AND THEOLOGICAL HISTORY 

40. 

322 x 222 mm. 215 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 1-1476 : The Didascalia. 

.11 jy*\> w y»j #J\ l~\ jUWI J-j».UlV ^Ul ytf ^-Jl i-oiJl U&*i!1 v tT. . . 
The work is divided into 39 bobs, and an introduction. The introduction covers ff. 501-106. 
The first bob begins (fol. 10b) : wiJI ^1 Ij>j IjJ«W jl >U*VI Jc ^ «l J^ J/^ vV 1 

..til i-i- Jc ^»~ii _j»J 

The last bob begins (fol. 1440) : ^Jl i^^k-JI J^V <- ,J ^ i V^' JLf oytf Ij £-^l y UI 

.J-JI AVI l*J* ^JJI JuUVI ^j DU-3JI \£ys Cr -il j^- UJ 

Ff . 10-4& contain an index to the work, with a preface written in the usual Arabic method, as 
follows : JS" \ Jm m UJL-jJI v tT U» -u Ul . . . JjMj fiiljjjl o- c^-il JjjJI ^LJI 4! ^-J 1 

.UUjJI jJUl 
B 
Ff. 1480-1560 : The Canons of Clement of Rome, disciple of St. Peter. 

Uju- & \j*~ jyjlj^l j\j JuJ^ 1 fc/jL. ^ W^ u->. Jr-J 1 V* 7 ( s * c ) <^ J ^ lA^ 1 ^^ 

The Canons are said to have been delivered by Peter to Clement, who at the beginning and 
at the end speaks in the first person. 

Begins : Vj lyi>j. Ij^I jurf V ^ I I J J15 . . . J^ Jl or J* j* (s*c) ^jjj U ^i*^ JK 

Ends (fol. 1556) : j U»Vlj Uj j$ .jf* Sfr J* MJ J^J V*.^ ••** <^ ^r^ i - , -^ JI ^J 

.Jul ^J»VI J»l Jl -X>eJlj £™^ ^ <JUc— »J^ Jl t/OiJl <>Zy»* ^_y_ 

The Canons deal with ecclesiastical subjects, such as Fast, Baptism, Confirmation, Priest- 
hood and Eucharist. 

C 

Ff . 1560- 170& : The Apostolic Constitutions, attributed also to Clement of Rome. 

<J^-i Jl jOI*i»il.5 (V—^ <v a y"*3 **3 re J l f"_j— ». uju*- j*» ^ ^j^£} /jjju?&JI juk— i>l ^Uj Ij> 



MINGANA COLLECTION 43 

Begins (fol. 1566) : JjJ-l J.j\ j jijc ol r V! >. & Cr J\ ^ lij aUI a. ^ Juodl lytT 

Ends: jU o*J1 lijj ^UJI y Ulj SjijJI i^U-j l+Jc Ijut j* l^jllj 

The subscription (fol. 1706) is: J-J1 IVI j^bUI c^jL-VI jU-l Jcf . . . JLr $\ ^ J-T 

.LJI Jl £c^Jl lix- ^-» -U j^mI^j ^iJlyj a4?j*&3 

D 

Ff. 171^1906 : Another section dealing with the Canons of the Apostles and Apostolic 
Constitutions. 

This section deals mostly with ecclesiastical hierarchy, with observance of holy days, with 
prayers for the dead, and with the laws of pilgrimage to Jerusalem. The Canons on ff. 1846- 
1886 are attributed to St. Paul. 

Begins: u-Ull ^>3J jc .j, ^ ^ <J* ^U Vj ±L>L ^o-VI 
Ends: <>l Ul Lb Cr JI ^ .Ucl v Ujl jc UU, UU 4.^ 

E 

Ff. 1910-215& : The 81 Canons of the Apostles. The Canons are preceded by an injunction 
dealing with some festivals of our Lord, and with some fasts. 

Ff. 1910-1950 contain the index to these Canons. The Canons are said here also to have 
been promulgated by Clement (fol. 196a). They correspond (with important variants) with 
those mentioned in Vat. Orient, viii, 559 ff. 

The first Canon begins (fol. 196a) : VI ^ V <ilj ^iUVI ^ iJj.JJI J^ ^ ^ ^ i" J/yi 
^ ^U- jy»^ ; and the 81st Canon, which deals with the canonical books of the Old" and of the 
New Testaments (ff. 2i3«-2i5«) begins : fcjj-lj *^\ ^ ^^Jl ^^Jl u >^ ^ <— ^ v-^Tl~-l ^3 

Dated (fol. 2156) Thursday, 25th of the Coptic month of Amshir of the year 1472 of the 
Martyrs (a.d. 1756), and written by Ibrahim Sulaiman Najjar, from the village of Mir, the priest 
of the Church of our Lady and of the Holy Women Martyrs Barbara and Juliana, formerly 
that of SS. Abu Kir (Cyrus, or Curius, or Mercurius) 2 and John. 

iL-jlj ^J\ <i- j^ ,y j^a\ ^ ja ^y^-H.? ^12-1 ^Jl l±ll j x j . . . IsjjLW UX-JI cJS' 

IjJL ^^Jl jUJJI jLL ^\j,\ j%J3l cmJ\ jJhl\ ^i\ 3 *U\ j^\ Kzf . . . jl^VI Ij^ii ^^3 <>*• 

1 I.e. Tituli. 

2 There are many churches and monasteries under the name of these two saints. See Abu Salih, Churches and 
Monasteries of Egypt, pp. 210-211, 217, etc. 



44 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

4jj\ \J~ \^ yJ j? y) ^ Mb (0~V ^ J1 - J1 ^ f^ ^ 3 Jil ^ • v ^ {sic) ?* 

XUyj lj\j Cr J\ oIjl^j Sj^WI JyJI ^Ji ^ OVI fij^l 

Written in a bold and clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters and 
sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 79.] 



41. 

328 x 233 mm. 317 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

An extensive Catena Patmm, or collection of extracts from Church Fathers and early Synods, 
in connection with the Incarnation of the Word. 

Some extracts from the Fathers found in the first part of the present MS. are also found in 
Mingana Syr. 481. 1 The MS. seems to bear the stamp of a semi-official book of the Coptic 

Monophysite Church. . ,, ^ v •, 

The compiler does not mention his name, but he was a Copt, believing m the Monophysite 

doctrine of the Incarnation. 
The Fathers quoted are : 

(1) Irenaeus. Two extracts 2 (ff. 6b-Sa) : J-JJ Ur tf ^ (*k) £*JI uiS-»l- jrjUjj.1 Ul Jtfj 

(2) Atticus of Constantinople, from his discourse on Nativity (fol. 8a) : i-J*" (sic) cr^ Jfy 

.a>Ull Jt .^ J (s*c) UJjj L-" CJ^j i-LLilo-ilt JjlJ*. <-W 

(3) Archaeus, bishop of Lepatin or Leptitana (in Arabic Lebda, in Africa), 2nd century, from 
his letter to Alexander (fol. 86) : o-jjJuSVI Jl W^^t ^J 1 «j J- J 1 V^" ^ -^ ^ Jl5 -> 

(4) Dionysius the Areopagite, from his letter to Timothy, the Disciple of St. Paul (ff . 86-96) : 

.^Jj, JuJj &Js\J* Jl dt-j ^ J- J I ^l* j-Ufl wii-t (sic) c/^lj^V! cr%*jyi* J^ 

(5) Ignatius of Antioch. Two extracts, the last of which is from his 13th letter (96-11 a) : 

.<dLj £ JuOtfl ^j c/>. j«. W^ jbl ^ <S^\ ilj.>. J^tll cT^^M a-.^ Jfy 

(6) Gregory Thaumaturgus : 

(a) From his discourse on the Trinity (ff. na-i^a) : ±JL*\ i**l»Jt *iU t/^y;,^' J*J 

.j-jiJl (sic) SjlUI J>-V •j*-* J J- J I j-*^ iijj^ v^» 

» See Catalogue of the Mingana Collection, vol. i., pp. 882-889. Cf. also Mingana Syriac 344, pp. 637-640 of the same 

Catalogue. 

2 These two extracts from Irenaeus are identical with those found in Mingana Syriac 481 (ff. 134&-1366 ; in the Catalogue 
p. 886), where " Lugdunum " appears in Garshuni as " Eden," and " Irenaeus " as " Hierotheus." Both these mistakes 
of spelling are due to errors of copyists, which I did not find it necessary to correct. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 45 

(6) From the end of his discourse on Faith (fol. 13a) : cfyjyt^ crt-^ 1 '•** ^J J^ 

.<iLVI _/-! »_>LS ^ ^ H L>»il fit* 

(7) Gregory the Illuminator. Three extracts from his Prayer (ff. 136-140) : ^oill Jl»j 

,4ft*, J ^ >\, o^l <yjVI <fl5L-i ^j cT_5j,J_j~^I 

(8) Alexander of Alexandria, who presided at the Council of Nicea. Two extracts (fol. 
14a), the last of which is from his discourse on the Trisagion : ij-uCVl AjJ* ^jjxSyi ^jlsJI Jl»j 

.As*— dl Jp-V aJU ^JJI j*~J\ ^i yVI li* L»l JUj . . . -u-ij ^JJI j*~^\ J <-a.J /»*^f J aJlaJI y»j 

(9) Athanasius of Alexandria. Various extracts : 

(a) From his treatise on the Incarnation (ff. 246-256) : &jj* <Xy)\ %fy*&\ J^^jJI JlSlj 

.Ufll 4JI jui J*-V lijiS WJU 4)lL j ijoiC-Vl 
(6) From his treatise on the Profession of Faith. Two extracts (260-276) : U»1 Jtfj 

.iiUVI j a*^j ^JJI y^JI j t/^M-iUrl lil ^-ull IA* 
(c) From his treatise on the Holy Trinity and the Economy of our Lord (ff. 270-300;) : 

.li-U- me***) I j-jJTJ (J-Afljl ^jJbl J>-V <dli» jj J^-Jl tfy*S&\ JLJI Lil Jl»_J 

(^) From his Profession of True Faith. Five extracts (fol. 30) : ^Jtfll L»l Jtf.5 

(0) From his discourse on the Body and the Soul, and on the Descent of our Lord 
into Hades (fol. 31a) : £~~JI pyj Uj Jjjij juI-Ij ^JuJI J»-V ^S&\ \j+ U»l Jtfj 

.jl^Vl o^j ppJM Jl 

(/) From his discourse on the Incarnation. Three extracts (fol. 316) : ^^ Lil Jl».j 

.yjl JUd* JC 4)15 ^JJI ^*-Jl J J^JI t/^-UTl 

(g) From his third discourse on the Trinity, against the Arians (fol. 320) : j*~JI J Jtfj 

(/&) From his twelve points to the Emperor Constantius, after he had recalled him 
from his exile (ff. 320-356) : U> ji£- ^\ J>-JI rfyJ®\ ^S&\ (A* U»l Jtf> 

(i) His letter to Epictetus, bishop of Corinth (ff. 356-436) : ^-ull (LI Jy ^* <!Uj 

•u-Lijy ^ii-l (sic) jjJa-^il Jl ijAiC-VI djjj* (j->— LuM 
(10) Basil of Caesarea : 

(a) From his discourse against Eunomius (fol. 436) : ijLJ wIL-l cr^L-L ^-ijlSJI Jl* 

.^r-^li^l Jl < ^rS' ^JJI ^-^l : ojaU 
(6) From his letter to Amphilochius (?) (fol. 436) : (stc) ^^-yuAJI Jl dUj J Lil JUj 



46 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(c) From his commentary on the words of Solomon " The Lord created me " 

(ff. 440-486) : .(^xaU- yjl jl jLJu- Jy jyJa ^^JL-l -U_>jJI \1* Jl*.j 

(d) From his Profession of Faith in the Trinity (ff. 450-486) : ^1 cO;^ tr*-*^ ^ 
(0) From his Canons, which number 106 (ff. 486-496) : rfy}~*\ c r J - J ^' '•** W^» ^1 2UVI 

.jJU <C-_j il» ^j «ujI^9 Jjl \ iij^U ijLJI < w ii-'l 

(11) Gregory Nyssen : 

(0) From the 15th discourse of his Commentary on the Song of Solomon (ff. 496-506) : 

(6) From his discourse on the baptism of our Lord (ff. 506-516) : -^jlSJI I Ja Jl» U»ij 

(c) From his commentary on Philip, (fol. 526). 

(d) From his discourse on Penitence (ff. 526-560) : ^JLA tf&jytfl Lr >.- J ^ 1 Ij* ^J Jl» 

.<>-.! Jlj ~*i!l ^ -cLi- jy» uj^s ^JJI aJU U^ iyil ^U jj-— i 

(12) Felix of Rome, from his discourse on the Incarnation and Faith. Three extracts 
(fol. 56) : iiUVlj Ju^dl Jc •j*-* j i-^j iJ^J* ^iOii ju^Jl J15 

(13) Hippolytus of Rome : 

(0) From his letter to Dionysius (fol. 606) : Jl <JLj j £*..jj ilj»J* c/ ,J ^^.' j****" *J^J 

iSy^fyi* • Another quotation from the same letter on fol. 606. 
(6) From his letter to Barsadagis x (ff. 590-606) : U j-jJj. JLJI lj* j* <£/-! i)L-j 

(c) from his Encyclical letter (ff. 606-610) : <j-jJ^. JiUJI JUJI |j» ^ ^^-1 aIL-j U*lj 

. jl£» JS" J iiiUVl *~*- Jl i-.jj ^jij*. 

(d) From his discourse on the unity of Christ. Three extracts (ff. 610-626) : U»l a! 12* 

.£c~~Jl olj^j J»-V L»jj 11 J^Ull <j"jJ_y. ( _r'. J ^l 1"^ U^ 

(e) From his discourse on the Incarnation (ff. 626-640) : J>-V <j"jJ_y. ^-j^I U* Jtf* 

.US3l 4)1 ^-i 
(14) Metholigen, 2 bishop of Rome (fol. 64) : ^c jy*L)l jU .Ujj 11 (sic) ,$£** Jtfj 

.y owiu 

1 In Harnack's Christliche Schriften, p. 645, this name appears as Bardagsis. 

8 In MS. Mingana'Syriac 481, ff. 2126-2136 (*'«&, p. 888), this name is spelt " Methologen," and in Mingana Syriac 344 
(ibid., p. 639), the name is spelt " Metholigus." 



MINGANA COLLECTION 47 

(15) Hippolytus of Rome, from his letter to Severianus of Gabala 1 (ff. 646-650) : ^odl Jl»j 

.(sic) ^Ac- ^-ii-l ^-Jtfll jJ'tj^^- J 1 <3Lj j <^jj iij»jl» (sic) j-juI^I 

(16), Sylvester of Rome, from his treatise against the Jews about the Passion of our Lord 
(fol. 65) : g r J\ ^ Uj ^^UJI f VI J>-V »j<Jl iujj J^Ja, ^osll c/>JL- JUj 

(17) Anatolius, bishop of Rome, called " the shining lamp " (ff. 656-660) : ^L-JI ^JIIJI JU> 

,<*)j t5 *^Jl iljjj* C5 ^*JI 

(18) St. Ephrem : 

(a) From his discourse on the Virgin. Two extracts (fol. 660) : »\j\ jL. ^jlSII Jttj 

•l^Li ^ J| l^Vj i** jlu JT^ ^jJuJl ^ J>-V aJU ill ^Jl j tfji ^ Jl^JI 

(6) From his commentary on the Pearl. Three extracts (ff. 666-680) : U* U»l JUj 

(19) Proclus of Constantinople : 

(a) From his discourse on the Nativity (fol. 680) : Jl Jij ^pLf ^ii-l ,Jij\ Jl»j 

(6) From his discourse on Thomas. Two extracts (fol. 686) : .^JJi ^*-Jl ^ U.1 JU? 

(c) From his discourse on the Incarnation (ff. 686-690) : <-^ ^ o**" -^r^ 1 J ^*J ^ 

,US3l 4)1 ^Jl- 

(d) From his letter to Armenia. Two extracts (fol. 690) : <dl_> j ^jrfl IJi» U.J Jttj 

.UoYI ji 
(0) From his discourse on the Annunciation (fol. 69) : ^*~JI j ^^ !■*» k+) J^j 

.•y*\yi -^"^ tSjAJI »a.JJ Jl^ ibUl ob# J>-V -0U j^JJI 
(/) From his discourse on the Creed. Two extracts (if. 696-700) : j*~j> j L»l J 15.) 

.3LVI J*-V ^ 
fe) Again from his discourse on the Incarnation (ff. 700-730) : ^adl la* L»l Jl»j 

.t t ..... J \\ 9 y~*_ uJU-< Jl~^ <J?"^' »»*-** ,j j-WjiJ 

(20) Severianus, bishop of Gabala, which is Askalon (fol. 730) : ^iL-l (sic) jjL ^.-^l Jfy 

. j>lL- c ^>) (sic) yAc- 

(21) Euphrasius, the archbishop of the Armenians. Two extracts (fol. 73) : ^jiSII JUj 

•c^jVI all ^-o tfyfs}\ 

1 This name " Gabala," owing to a slight change in Arabic characters between the letters 6 and y, appears in the MS. 
as " Gayla." The copyist of Mingana Syr. 481, fol. 2136, where the same quotation is found, not being familiar with the word 
" Gabala," or " Gayla," changed it to " Gilan," the old Persian province on the Caspian Sea. 



48 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(22) John of Jerusalem, from his discourse on the Creed (if. 736-760) : \x>- x ^J^M J^> 

(23) Theodotus, bishop of Ancyra, from his discourse on the Nativity (ff. 760-786) . Eight 
extracts : IU& *%* J^-V I4IIS ^1 aJUJI j lyil ^ii-l ^J^jlr ^ajtfl JU? 

(24) Epiphanius of Cyprus : 

(0) From his work Ancoratus. Thirteen extracts (ff. 786-960) : <j-yli.il crl osJI JV5j 

.L-^Jl ,^lo ■»..>.. J I jS$\ Ailo ^ cO-* •*-«*-» I 
(6) From his book on the Twelve Precious Stones (fol. 886) : j ^.-^1 1J* ^J J^.? 

.^ >lc ^Vl Jp-V 46 ^JJI V 133» 

(25) Gregory Nazianzen : 

(0) From his discourse on the Trinity (ff. 960-980) : ji^Ull a'yjy^.J^ <j*„>&\ Jfy 

.a._jLjJI wSJl o^Wi ^i Jl» l<r . . . .jjijil ^_ii-l 0I-4IVI; 
(6) From his discourse on the Son. Two extracts (fol. 98) : j,VI Jc »^~» J Jl»j 
(c) From his letter to Cledonius (ff. 986-996) : <dUj j .ifyjyt^ o* -"^' '*** ^ "-^ 

(0") From his discourse on the Nativity (ff. 996-1000) : ^JJI *y^\ jc .^ J L*l JU> 

,*jj| Jj a)jI 

(26) John Chrysostom : 

(0) From his discourse on the Trinity. Two extracts (ff. 1000-1096) : l».j» .U^jJI JU»j 

.ijL^ji <-jjuJi ^bi <iuvi j>-v Ail; ^ ^ uu^i j^j. v-^jji J 

(6) From his discourse on the Nativity. Three extracts (ff. 1096-1100) : J L»l JlSj 

(c) From his commentary on Matthew. Two extracts (fol. 1100) : J ^JtfJI 1A* JUj 

,^a-»^J ibUI Jy ^ J^ J.^1 j— iT 
(0*) From his commentary on John (fol. no) : j~Js j j^JI^ «,UI ^**JI J U»l Jl».j 

(0) From his discourse on the Nativity, which begins : " With great mystery." Three 
extracts (ff. 1106-1130) : ^f ^ aSjI J&\ >%J\ jc ^ ; LI JU> 

(/) From the 77th discourse of his commentary on John (fol. 1130) : ^Jl j Ul Jtfj 

• li>-_y_ J-^l ^y— «T ^» j_yu-Jlj «jUI 

(g) From his commentary on Psalm 46 (fol. 113) : ^ j \^ 3 Ji\ J;\jj\ : UJ J15.J 



MINGANA COLLECTION 49 

(h) From the 3rd discourse of his commentary on the Second Epistle to the Cor- 
inthians (fol 1136) : <JUj j^Js J Jtdl ^Jl j ^JJI ^ \^ y _ ^osJi ij^ uj jttj 

•u*>~>jy> J*l Jl obi ^J^, 
(*) From the 4th discourse of his commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews (fol. 113&) : 

oul^l Jl ^y, aILj jyJS £, g\J\ J ^J\ ^ Ul JUj 

(/) From his commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians. Six extracts (ft. 1140-1 17a) : 

.^^Jl <1Uj j^js u > J Id I ^^Jl : Ul JU> 
(&) From his discourse on the Ascension. Four extracts (ff. 1170-1186) : : Ul JU, 

•Cjn.jVI fj* ^ ^^1 Jc .^ 
(/) From his discourse on the Annunciation (ff. 118&-1190) : J^ .^ : Ul JlSj 

,L*a2ll bJjJ iJ^Ul a!U Uj oUJl 

(w) From his discourse on the Nativity, which begins : " The Fathers and the 

Prophets." Three extracts (fol. 119) : jl 4,1 all >%J\ jc. %J ^ ^ Ul Jtfj 

.U UVIj IVI 

(27) Theophilus of Alexandria : 

(a) From his discourse on Faith (ff. ugb-X20a) : (J *U\ ftaJl AjJ* ^Jijlr ^adl JU 

.AiUVl J>-V ij-wC-Vl 
(fc) From Heretistica, 1 xxi. (fol. 1200:) : j^Jlj ^li-l IClJoVI j Ul Jtij 

(28) Cyril of Alexandria : 

(a) From his Profession of Faith (ff. 1200-1210) : ij^CVI tfU ^j ^f^asll QUI 

(6) From his book Dialogues with Hernias, on the Catechumens : I4JU w2Jl <iUVl JU 

.^S^, jl jj ^ ^vU^i! pjrf ^^ U ^JJI utfll ^ ^)^r ^jjfll 

(c) From his discourse on the Trinity (ff. 1230-1260) : o jjfi ^^T ^adl 4li j^ 

.AjlUI J>-V 
(i) From his letter to John (of Antioch ?). Two extracts (if. 1260-1270) : J Ul JUj 

.oULIl tiLfcJI U-_y H Jl dLj 
(*) From his discourse on Faith (fol. 127) : XiUVI A ^aSJI la* Ul Jtf, 
(/) From his letter to the monks about the Virgin Theotokos (fol. 128) : IJU Ul Jtf, 
.*M\ j,^> aIVI Sallj J^V 4 ^> ^ jUJI Jl ^ ^J^ jjUl ^adl 
(g) From his 2nd letter to Severus (fol. 128ft) : ^j^J ^JJI J\5\ *kf ; Ul JUj 



1 This word " Heretistica," which often occurs in the MS., may possibly be derived from the Greek alper^ (selector), 
and may consequently mean " select letters," " collection of extracts." 

4 



50 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 
h) From his discourse on Faith, addressed to the Emperor Theodosius (ff. 128&-1290) : 

i) From his letter to John, after having received his answer (fol. 129) : Jl <JU> j* 

,<JU -X>-1 U Jk*i /y» U>- y 

j) From his letter to Nestorius (ff. 1296-1306) : jiLUl j^kJ J I ^ ^^ ^-^1 ilL-j 
£) From his discourse on the Unity of Christ (ff. 1306-1310) : ^JJl ^^1 ^ Ul «0j 

.rc~-Jl yk Jj>-lj jl aIU 

/) From the 5th tomos against Nestorius (fol. 131) : ^ Jl L*»$-\ <^^ ^ U»t a]j 

w) His letter to John of Antioch (1316-1320) : ^j U^_ Jl ^^ ^JiM U» ,y <Jt-_> 

«) His letter to Acacius of Scythopolis (fol. 1320) : (sic) u ^\i\ Jl ,-aJtfll IJl» j* a)Lj 

.(sic) Ujy.1 ^Ji-I 

0) His letter to Acacius of Melitene (fol. 132) : ^LJU ^Ji-I .-—Ul Jl I4* ^j5^ aJLo 
#) From his letter to the Synod of the Egyptian bishops assembled in Alexandria 
against Nestorius. Four extracts (ff. 1326-1350) : ^jf ,j^\ aIUj j» j** -VT 

0) His letter to Nestorius. Three extracts (ff. 1350-1396) : j^LJ Jl ^j5C <i, a)Lj Ulj 

f) From his letter to the Oriental bishops (fol. 1396) : juSyull Jl ^^ ^&\ JLJI |jl» ^ 

s) From his 2nd Profession of Faith (fol. 1400) : : o^jf cr*-^ 1 c^ ^ ^^ d*) 

.j^jJI (j* odl aaJI 
# From his Thesaurus. Two extracts (fol. 140) : jiS3l ^ Ul ^ 

u) From his letter to Eulogius (ff. 1406-1410) : ^153 1 ij-y^jljl Jl Ul aUj 

v) From his commentary on the First Epistle to the Corinthians (fol. 1420) : U I JUj 

•uJjJ JM aIlji ^ Aiu ^jji ^li-i ^ji ^ 

w) From his discourse on the Incarnation of the Word (ff. 1420-1450) : , Ul JU, 

.Util ^Jlr J>.| 
a;) From his first book of Thesaurus (fol. 1450) : j/yi V K)I ^ ^J^ ,^-J^i W Ulj 

•J*^' (a****., <3*^' J"*^' 

» From the seventh chapter of the second book of Thesaurus (fol. 145) : ^ Ul .A3 

.y J&1 e^l jWI v li3l j, «UI J-mII 



MINGANA COLLECTION 51 

(z) From the eighth chapter of this same book. Three extracts (ff. 1460-147&) : 

•e^ V JI jl hSU AyS ^JJI JtuVI J v y£JI J^V J.W1 J-ai!l J j~A\ la* J Ul JUj 
(00) From the forty-ninth chapter of his discourse on the Unity of Christ (fol. 1476) : 

.Jr.jVlj £-UI J-mII <j Jb-lj Cr -JI JrV aJU ^JJI ^Jl ^ Ul JUj 
(66) From his Book of Questions. The questions quoted are Nos. 21, J*,, 83, 87, 117, 
207, 217 (ff. 147&-149&). Begins : i-l liLil j>-l ,^j IaU-I <1L~JI <y Ulj 

(cc) Letter to Succensus (ff. 149a -154a): (sic) 'Sy Jl ^jf ^ri-^l ^ <)Lj 

.lj^-^11 (sic) ijLilia 
(dW) His second letter to Succensus (ff. 1540-157&) : li» Jl ^^ Ul ^ old I 3UJI 

.(Sfc'c) 40^—4)! ijUs ^_ii— I ~Jl3_}-> cjVI 

(^) From his letter to the pious emperors (ff. 1576-1690;) : ^J? ^^1 !•** l-»l JUj 

.UVI iJ/JI Jl 4, ^ LI 

07) From the seventh chapter of his Explanation of the Mystery of Christ, against 

Nestorius (fol. 169a) : j^kJ SUI *jli ^.-Jl ^ _^J»r ^ *,UI J-aill J V VI li» Ul Jl»j 

(gg) From his Scholia (ff. 1690-1710) : jlc dWl ;Uy^VI J Ul J\»j 

(29) Theodosius of Alexandria : 

(a) From his Synodical Letter to Severus of Antioch (ff. 1710-1720) : ^jlSJI JIZ* 

ijaiC-Vl ^j" Jc tfjjjL. jU U [+£* ^1 j2oyJl dLj J ji-l L*>JI if^ym^S 

ASM &jj^ tfjj^ /U\ Jl 
(6) From his discourse on the Trinity (ff. 1720-1786) : cf^y-i^ ^.JtfH l-i* Ul Jttj 

.Oii »U» 4ll» ^jjl ^wJ| y»} . . . jJ-JliJl o_j)bl J>-V A*i^ ^ j 

(c) From his letter, when in exile, to the people of Alexandria (ff. 1790-1810) : Ul JG> 
.ijoiCVI <ioc g^Jl ^^Jl ^-dl Jl ^1 ^ yt_j l^^l dLj j t/jj-^ijlr oVI lo» 

(30) Severus of Antioch : 

(0) His Profession of Faith, presented to the Emperor Anastasius (ff. 1810-185&) : 

4) ^*JI dUJI Jl iSlkil ^JiJi 4JI ftju U tfjjl. ^all l^ ^Jl i^2LJI <iUVI 

(&) From his letter to Julian on the Incarnation (ff. 1856-1880) : ^jJI li* Ul Jlij 

.oiS3l 4VI oJi J^V (sfc) c/jU^II ^yUjt Jl dLj j j^L 
(c) From his discourse on "My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me ? " (fol. 188) : 

.JSj UU ^Vl ^Vl V> £JI J>-V 0J ^ j Ul JBj 
(i) From his discourse read before the emperor (ff. 1886-1896) : ^jjfll li* Ul Jfy 

.aui f u uju ^jji du, j j^jji ^^u jyi 



52 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(e) From his letter to the emperor. Two extracts (ff. 1896-1900) : <. ^:S LJ L»l Jl5j 

.dUJI Jl 
(/) From his Synodical Letter to John of Alexandria. Two extracts (ff . 1900-1910) : 

(g) From his Synodical Letter to Theodosius of Alexandria (ff. 1910-1950) : La I JlSj 

(31) Jacob of Serug : 

(0) From his maimra on Nativity. Two extracts (fol. 195a) : <JlL*\ u_jl» ^J^l J^> 

(5) From his maimra on the Passion. Two extracts (fol. 195) : ^1 <JUJI J 1*1 Jl5j 

(32) Benjamin of Alexandria, from " Heretistica " xvi. against those who say that the 
divmity of God is mortal (ff. 1956-2000) : <-oUl 15CjJ»jV1 J ijJuCVI i)j»,J» ^juU» Ul ^^odl Jl5j 

.ol^» <*JL\5I 4II oyV jl 0^5* (W^ ji^)U»b*JI «*» _yix- 

(33) J°hn of Alexandria, from his Synodical Letter to Cyriacus of Antioch (ff. 2000-2056) : 

.tflLil £ Jm )» ^Vj* a-.-^ J 1 o*-»y-JI ^J J V-J^-VI i)jjja» U^_y_ Lit ^-xsll Jfy 

(34) Cyriacus of Antioch, from his letter to Mark, Patriarch of Alexandria (ff. 2056-2116) : 

.ijjoC-Vl U ^jJy. Ul y»lDI Jl jiayJI -dUj J tflLil iljjj* ^y^Jt cri.-^ 1 «-^J 

(35) Theodosius of Antioch, from his letter to Michael of Alexandria (ff. 21 16-2140) : 
.ijjuC-V! &jjm J-*Uw Lil y>lWI ^jiSII Jl jiayJl <iLj ^ tflLil ^J. j-j^l" ^uSJI Jtfj 

(36) Dionysius of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Michael of Alexandria (ff. 2140- 
216a) : ijjoCl II (sic) JJ*. Ul ^-ull V VI Jl ji^yJI <dUj : <SlLil d^J* trj^-jijt* ^^ J^ 

(37) Gabriel of Alexandria, from his Synodical Letter to John of Antioch (ff. 2160-2186) : 

Afte\ AjJ* \3- x Ul ^jsSI Jl ^yJI <dLj ^ ijjOCVI U Jl^ Lil ^j-11 Jt».> 

(38) Cosmas of Alexandria : 

(a) From his Synodical Letter to John of Antioch (ff. 2186-2206) : jl*j5 Ul ^jjfli JUj 

.tflUI djJL, l».jj, Ul Jl a^jUl <JUj : ijjuC-VI djt> 
(6) From his letter to Basil of Antioch (ff. 2206-2226) : Ul Jl jLji Ul V V1 a)L-j #3 

(39) Basil of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Cosmas of Alexandria (ff. 2226-2290) : 

.V-uC-VI djj. jLjJ Lil Jl ^yJI <JUj ^ tfiLii -IjJL, trjJUl. ^.J-ll JSj 

(40) Macarius (Makarah), Patriarch of Alexandria, from his Synodical Letter to John of 
Antioch (ff. 2290-2310) : U^_ Ul ^UJl Jl jioyJl <JLj j ijjOC-VI ^J* #J U. Ul ^jtfll JIjj 



MINGANA COLLECTION 53 

(41) Dionysius, Patriarch of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Menas 1 Patriarch of 
Alexandria (ff. 2310-2360) : IL. Ul Jl ^yj, dUj „ ISU\ « U ^ ^^ Ul V VI Jlij 

(42) Menas of Alexandria, from his Synodical Letter to John of Antioch (ff. 2360-2380) ■ 

(43) Dionysius of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Menas of Alexandria (ff. 2380-24™) : 

.Vȣ-l <J a ,U IL. Ul Jl ^^ <*Lj # ISU\ J^>, ^^ j>U ^jjjl JBj 

(44) John of Antioch : 

(a) From his Synodical Letter to Menas of Alexandria, when the Emperor of Con- 
stantinople seized the former, in 1280 of the Martyrs (a.d. 969), and brought him 
to Constantinople to be interrogated by the Patriarch of the Metropolis (ff . 2410- 
247*) : v-uC-VI U IU Ul jl ISU\ J_,>. ^ Ul ^iyi y ^j ^^ $ Lj ^ 

Uj *•>* .^ij UULJI Jl 4, ^ tflLil U ^ Ul ^Uj fJj |l dU.Jtfl u 

.ULiLsll J a > 4Uj vdUl ^jju, _^U UUJI 

(6) From his Synodical Letter to Menas of Alexandria (if. 2470-2500) : Ul ^jjill JUj 

.vaiCvi ^>. iu ui ^u v vi ji *u J***" at-j j tfwi ^J*. u^ 

(45) Hippolytus 2 of Rome : 

(0) From his discourse on the Incarnation (fol. 2440) : ^ Ujj ^u.1 ^ ^1 Jj5i 

.^•1 ^ <rljU ^ 411 <jT ^U ^j^UJi ot ^jji ^ 
(6) From his discourse on the Union of the Body of Christ with His Divinity (•&&)": 

.AiyVj Cr JI ^ aUl jc jji .^ j Ul 4> 
(c) From his letter to Dionysius of Cyprus (fol. 2446) : ##,}# Jl dLj ^ Ul aIj 

(46) Philotheus of Alexandria : #uV """' 

(0) From his letter to Dionysius, Patriarch of Antioch (ff. 2500-2530) : <JLj ^ J^ 

.tfUJI i) a >, u-jt-^ji* j»UJ» yVI J 1 *>&-VI d a >. i/wtyi Ul 
(ft) From his Synodical Letter to Athanasius, Patriarch of Antioch (ff. 2535-255^) : 

.tflUl ^>, ^^Ufl Ul Jl l^tfCyi J^U ^|ryi yi ^ ^ ^ Uj * ^ 

(47) Athanasius of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Philotheus of Alexandria (ff 
2556-2580) : v^Vt ^>, ^l?^ Ul Jl ISU\ ^>, u-^Url Ul ^ ^^ ^ & 

(48) John, Patriarch of Antioch, from his letter to Zechariah, Patriarch of Alexandria 
(ff. 2580- 2610). Two letters : t^oC-VI ^J* ^U-j Ul Jl tflLil <U>, U>._,_ Ul ^ i^ flLj ^ 

1 Written also Minas or Mennas. 

* These extracts from Hippolytus are found in the Synodical letter of John of Antioch. 



54 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(49) Zechariah, Patriarch of Alexandria, who was the 64th in the series of the Patriarchs 
of that city : 

(0) From his Synodical Letter to John of Antioch (ff. 2616-2640) : J**y»* ^Uj <y 

l^_y_ Lit j*M \L\ Jl tfjlUJI aop # dy^h «ijll yo v-uC-VI U ^IjU-Ij UV 

,<J1 Uj\jf\ JiisyJ] <c!Lj ^ Cljip- <5Uail flj»jUj 

(6) From his Synodical Letter to John of Antioch, in the year 403 of the Hijrah (a.d. 
1012) (ff. 2640-2656) : LSI Jl ijjjCVl AjJ* cj-U^U-0 Lil V VI ^ j^y- ^j j* 

(50) Sanutius, Patriarch of Alexandria : 

(0) From his Synodical Letter to Dionysius, Patriarch of Antioch, in answer to the 
latter's letter, in 752 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1036) (ff. 2656-2690) : jvy- <1L-j j* 

oW^Vl Ij^JJ jv-*-.? i>i«*lj iLjw- VdY 1 <u- .j ojl^ll <JI *dLj ^c 

(6) From his Synodical Letter to Dionysius of Antioch, in answer to his letter, in 751 

of the Martyrs (a.d. 1035) (#• 2690-2780) : djjJL Wy}^ ^»V tjvy- ^-J ^ 

The date 751 is written also in Coptic numerals. 

Among the Fathers quoted is Ignatius of Antioch (fol. 2766) : 4JI ^V o-jJ»Uel Jli 

(51) Dionysius of Antioch, from his Synodical Letter to Sanutius of Alexandria (ff. 2780- 
2800) : ijjaC-VI &jjm cryjj\« V 1 ^ J 1 ^^ ^jjm Wy^jy* Ul ILV j&d^U 31 to ^ 

(52) Christodolus, Patriarch of Alexandria : 

(0) From his letter to John of Antioch (ff. 2800-2826) : J)>y\^j~\ Lil yVI aILo ^ 

.tflUI dj^L. U^_ Ul Jl ijaiC-Vl -IjjJL 

(6) From his yearly Encyclical to all the bishops under his jurisdiction (Heretistica, 
xvi., xvii., xx., xxi., xxiii.) (ff. 2826-2850) : 4* ;^Ul y^ <-oUl lC:J»jVI j* 

.<L- Jf ^ a,jjJ£-VI ^1/* £*• Jl ^jL->l Lil y VI 

(53) John of Antioch : 

(0) From his Synodical Letter to Christodolus of Alexandria (ff. 2850-2886) : V VI & 

.a,j.uC-VI Ajjm i !j* J L->l Lil y VI Jl tfU*il d a >. <y**>L- 3Uj L^_ Ul 

(6) From his second Synodical Letter to Christodolus of Alexandria (ff . 2886-2936) : 

.ij.uCVl -IjJL jl>ajk->l Ul Jl tflLil d,J. l^_y_ Lil JjJLl oVl ^ ji^L- iJUj ^ 

(c) From his Synodical Letter to Christodolus of Alexandria, carried by Timothy, 
bishop of Jerusalem, and read in the towns of Egypt in the year 782 of the 

1 Written also in Coptic numerals. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 55 

Martyrs (a.d. 1066) (ff. 2926-2940) : tflLil &jj* ^>-y, Ul ^ JJuJ\ ( fi*yd\ j* 
<iLJli c^j ^ (j-jiiJi c*-» j'^» ^jlrUJ* Ul Ac ijjoC-Vl iljj.^. ^j^>^_/-' ^ J' 

oUl»VI Ij^^JO VAY &- jy*\ j vlo^J ^^ jjlj 

The date 782 is written also in Coptic numerals. 

In a chapter found in the book of the Synodicon of the Coptic Church (fol. 286), at the 
beginning of the letters of the above John, Patriarch of Antioch, are quotations from the 
following Christian Arab writers : 

(54) Habib, bishop of Tegrit, who is called Abu Ra/itah, and who nourished in the ninth 
Christian century ; from his letter to the Christians from the West found in the Bahrain (on the 

Persian Gulf). Three extracts (ff. 2926-2930:) : j U*.^ Ul J)l\ IJj» J_Lj JjI J lyC J-aAll Ijj» 
.v_^iJI ^jLai ja (^jmJI <y JI 4 aIUj J (sic) <Ulj ^1 UCj i*j& i^ii-l w~»- Ul Jlsj .YA1 1 Jj^I ^^ 

(55) Yahya b. 'Adi (b. Hamid a. Zakaria'), who died in a.d. 974, from his letter to Kasim 
b. Habib abu Hasan, against the Nestorians (ff. 2930-2940) : ju*- ^»l ^sc ^,1 ^.^ IJfj y\ JU> 

.ij^Jl Jc JJ u^>. jjl pill jJ-l ^1 JI <i. <5Uj ^ IjTj (S^C) £.1 

(56) Gregory Thaumaturgus, his twelve chapters on the Incarnation, with a commentary 
(ff. 2940-2976) : j^eJI 4J £*~^' J ^f J^ U^ i-«jUhJI /*iU» ^ii-Vi cry.jj*^ a"*-" 1 ^ ^"^ -^ <y»^ 

(57) Hippolytus of Rome, his six Anathemas, as quoted by Timaeus of Antioch (ff. 2976- 

298^) : <\l2 J j*JjLJ» <» Jk+il-l VjT i-.jj <i»UI ^j t/Ju)_y. l^J^ (^JJI f-J.r""' 

(58) Euthalius, bishop of Rome (?), from his five Anathemas on the Faith, as quoted by 
Cyril of Alexandria in his letters to the emperors (fol. 298) : ^^^ ^ I .^Jl o* &M rtjM 

..vi Cr ~Ji ji j>.i ^ 4iu ^jji ii>Ji ji ^^T-u^ji a, ^ i* Aiuvi j>-i ^ jl.jj w»u ^.j 

(59) Gregory Nazianzen, his twelve Anathemas, found in the letter which he wrote to 
Cledonius, as translated from Coptic into Arabic (ff. 2986-3000) : a t yjy > ^ ut^ ^ <&& t*J~\ 

•i*^ 1 J 1 J^ { cr j~* ^ ( sic ) <-oe>^i ji \^ ^\ aLji ^ . . . ijjijJi ^ji-i oUJVl jMai 

(60) Cyril of Alexandria, his twelve chapters (Anathemas) written in the Council of 
Ephesus, with a commentary (ff. 3000-3066) : <i»U ^j ^^ ^Jtill ^1 !>^» y^ ,yfVI 1.1* 

.jj-j^JI «*»*Jl ^ t _ r — jl ^ JU^J ijJoC-Vl 

(61) Theodosius, Patriarch of Alexandria, his five Anathemas found in the letter which 
he wrote to Alexandria while in exile (ff. 3066-3070) : iljjjL u'j-.-wl" ^oSlI I4JU ^l ^^l 

.^jjiiCvi ji u~T ^i iiuji ^ ijjjC-vi 

(62) John, bishop of Baralus, his thirteen Anathemas found in the discourse on the Church 
Ordinances (ff. Wjb-zoqa) : Uatfl ^J Jc aJU JA\ y^J\ j ^J'^l ^is^l l^^_ Ul l^Jtf ^1 ^JA 

1 Written in Coptic numerals. 



56 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(63) Cyril of Alexandria, various quotations from his works, with special reference to his 
discourse against Apollinarius (ff. 3116-313*), and to his Thesaurus. On fol. 311 is a short quota- 
tion from the letter of Gregory Nazienzen to Cledonius (ff. $0^-3150). Headed : ^ ,y J^ 

.ijjJ^-VI Ajjm jAjf ^jA\ JK .Ju^il Jc cAsfa pw^sJI IVI 

The MS. which is described in the colophon : " Profession of Faith of our Holy Fathers, 
Doctors of the orthodox Church," is dated (fol. 3156) Monday, 12th of the Coptic month Mesori, 
of the year 1584 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1868), and written in the monastery of the Abbot Paula 
(Paul), by the priest-monk Shenudah, for Rizk George Khashshab, of the Jacobite community 
of Cairo. 

u-jiJI ojitf! Sjrf Ij-fcoVI <U' cs-^ t*-!-** 1 ^U *$s*V O*-^ 1 *-*-J^ V 1 ^ 1 li * C J ^ 3 f" 
^jisll \L\ j* . . . jl^Vi Ij^JJ omVcj i-jl i.L-i-3 cJI aX- ^^r- ^ ^ Jlr ibUi jurVl f _y„ J 

. . . Vj. Ul All ^.Jill ^ f *U- oy* ^ . . . jf~^ «rf* ■*. J* C^ Jl J ^ -^ V -* V 1 J ^ r Ul 

Clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. 
Leaves numbered in Coptic numerals. 

The MS. seems to have been well collated with the original, as on many pages is found the 
following inscription on the margin : " The collation has reached here." 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 67.] 

42. 

335 x 219 mm. 62 leaves. Twenty-five lines to the page. 

The orations of St. Athanasius of Alexandria against the Arians, or Orationes IV contra 

AriariOS [Kara 'Apeiavcbv Adyoi 8'). 

. ju-^jVI Jui ijjaC-VI AiSLI ijJtj j~f}\ t/j^Ufl 0VI2* 

As the MS. is incomplete at the beginning and at the end it has no regular title, and the 
titles of two orations are also missing in the middle of the MS. owing to two lacunae. The only 
titles found in the MS. are those of the third oration (fol. 86) and the fifth oration (fol 62b). 

The third oration begins : ^0 jJ&\ j-yJ#\ «>-jlS1I ^ Ji^l li-V a5u-.jj.jVI j± £ltdl <1UJ1 
UU^ ^1 &W.jd! ju, UJ lyT ji v-joVi oyL\ ajVM ^ ^ cuT J 1 * Kl W .vaaC-I WU 

Uj . (J J£cJl Jc ^Jl j» a» l^J&j o l>*t2>-l U Jc <^oli ji-l oUI ^ ^1 j^l^Jlj jVI Ji ^-^ 

The fifth oration begins : ^.j ^J3l t/j^Url jv^Jill ^ JiJ-l ILV jwjoVI .u. <~*l2-l <!UJI 
J ^jJl gj-JI ^3 *\ Vi pili ^JJt Ulj US3I jlT 4llj jV a|T j* 4jT y» US3I jl .ijjOC-l *£U 

I.A4I ATyj Alt I j cS>-) 4Ji <•*£.> 4jl j* 4jl yk ^-Jl jl ^ ^i .<>l jyjJI Jl ^jL. I4II <J53\ Jc- Jj_ 



MINGANA COLLECTION 57 

In comparing the beginning of these orations with the Greek work of St. Athanasius, we 
notice first that in the Greek the orations are only four, and not five as in the present MS. We 
are not in a position to solve definitely this problem, owing to the lacunae at the beginning. 
We may only conjecture that another short work by Athanasius against the Arians may have 
been counted as the first oration. That this hypothesis is possible is borne out by the fact that, 
as seen in the above quotations, the third oration of the MS. corresponds with the second oration 
of the Greek text, and the fifth oration with the fourth oration of the Greek text. We give 
below, from the beginning of the second and fourth orations as translated from the Greek in 
the series entitled : The Ancient and Modern Library of Theological Literature, the words corre- 
sponding with the above Arabic quotations : 

P. 82. " I had, indeed, hoped that the arguments I had brought forward against the 
blasphemies of the Arians, and against the absurdities and errors of their doctrines, would 
have been sufficient to entirely confute these heretics, and to reduce them to silence ; and to 
make them sensible of, and sorry for, the impieties they have invented and uttered against the 
Blessed Lord. But alas ! it is no easy matter to make them acknowledge their errors. Just 
as swine and dogs wallow in their own vomit and mire, even so do they revel in their irreligion, 
and invent further fallacies." 

P. 262. " The Word is God of God, for ' The Word was God ' (S. John i. 1), and again, 
S. Paul says, ' Whose are the Fathers, and of whom as concerning the flesh Christ came, who is 
over all, God blessed for ever, Amen ' (Rom. ix. 5). Moreover, since Christ is God of God, and 
the Word, and the Wisdom, and the Son, and the Power of God, therefore it is plain that there 
is but One God revealed to us in the Holy Scriptures." 

Five MSS.^ of this work of Athanasius, translated by the Greek Orthodox writer Mas'ad 
Nushu, are registered in Graf's Catalogue de Manuscrits, pp. 120-121, 137, 143, 212 and 224. 

No date. Written in a clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1790. The 
headings of the makalahs in thick black characters, and their sub-headings in red. Broad margins. 

Many leaves have disappeared from the MS. apart from those missing at the beginning 
and at the end, as there are lacunae between ff. 16-17, 25-26, 32-33, 33-34. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 10 1.] 

43. 

224 x 169 mm. 8 leaves. Eighteen and twenty lines to the page. 

A MS. on vellum, containing spiritual and ethical treatises by St. Ephrem. 

A 
Fol. ia : The end of a parenetic discourse. 
Ends : <GL>i- ^ ^ 4! ^1 .Ui d^J- j£ V; 6^^ %} ^jjjJI ^ ^ |ga j,J, 1 dJLr V 

B 

Ff. ia-$a : A treatise on the spiritual struggle. 



58 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 



Begins : $\ I d&> ^ ^\ JU US' U4JI Jl. ^ ^ I 

Ends : Uj w. iLi <-*% <J iLal^ ^JJI 45 *~M c^JI li» Ju-s- ,y ^UA^ ^ ^ jUl lil 

.4>i ->y^l £f J 1 £7-^ ^ ^oll £ : ~^ £>~- 

C 
Ff. 3*1-56 : A treatise on the fact that a monk should not laugh nor rejoice, but should weep 
and sigh over his soul. 

See the Graeco-Latin edition of St. Ephrem, i., 254-258. 

.la, I <u~ «i ^ ry*--' 
Begins : Lm^JIj dU*al y» <-*»ijll ^ ^\j- J^ 
Ends : <>l pJUl t/ J£ ^w-JI ^ ^.j I f til J-»- ^ j&h y M J" o* cs*-*^ 

D 

Ff . $b-8a : A treatise containing the answer of St. Ephrem to a man who had asked him 
how to repent. 

.^ujjdl fly jU Jy> ^ IJ* .Jyj is*^ Cr**" 

Begins : lyii ^JM UU ^jt ^ju- I a] JU5 ^1 ^ Jl jUI U- 

Ends : j\JUl uj jv*l iUlj »Li-»l *» *Lc jc U*-i^ ta-y. jl 4II <j» ^*«J1 JLJ 

E 
Fol. 8a : A treatise on the demon and death. 

.OjJij jUa-Jt jc- aJU .j-jjJI f\j jU Jy ^ L»t l.i» .^"^-.j Jyj c5*VI ^--Jl 

Begins : lS iJ i U JT US2*»l J& jl joi ^Jll i)li <y ».p-1 I 

Incomplete at the end. The final words are : V JI a! Jl» Lii *j» j\. ~iy 

Thick vellum. No date. Written in an early Christian Kim hand of about a.d. 880. 
Headings in red. Fairly broad margins. Coarse ornamental patterns in black separate the 
treatises. 

Some paleographical characteristics of the hand used in the MS. are : 

(1) The Alif resembles the Syriac cursive Alaf. This is especially the case with the initial 
Alif, which has at its lower end a sloping stroke to the right. 

(2) The initial Lam resembles slightly also the Syriac Lamadh, but has at the top end a 
sloping stroke to the left, while the final Lam has a straight stroke at the lower end. 

(3) The Kaf is often formed more or less like a Lam. The only difference is that it is not 
so long, and its lower stroke is slightly elevated at the end. 

(4) The diacritical points are often used, but sometimes omitted. 

A strip of extremely thin vellum with Greek uncial writing has been glued upside down 
on fol. la, and bound in the corpus of the volume. The strip measures 189 x 19 mm., and 



MINGANA COLLECTION 59 

contains part of verse 32, chapter xiii., of St. Matthew's Gospel. Greek paleographers to whom 

the strip has been shown have pronounced it to be of the first half of the fourth Christian 

century, and possibly the oldest vellum MS. of the gospels that contains the present verse. 

See No. 91 [94]. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 93.] 

44. 

254 x 170 mm. 228 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

A volume consisting of two different ancient MSS. put together by an early binder and 
containing miscellaneous matter. 

A 

Ff. ia-i2b : A discourse by Anastasius, the Abbot of the Monastery of Mount Sinai, con- 
taining a commentary on Psalm 6. It is read at the beginning of Lent. 

' — " » * 

B 

Ff. 130-19& : The discourse of Cyril of Alexandria on the Circumcision of our Lord. 

c 

Ff. 19&-24& : The discourse of Michael, the Metropolitan of Damascus, on the beginning 
of Lent. 

\ .HJi tiL-^ *>-jl.) yj I iljl .cT-uJi ^^-«»ll Jy-z j Jy Jj^-o <i»Ll ( _ r -fj J-fUe.* XnJI ILV 

D 

Ff. 240-390 : A discourse by John Chrysostom, on the fact that a man must not despair 
after committing a sin, if he confesses it and repents, illustrated by the example of Elijah the 
Prophet and St. Peter. 

Jli.1 l^ic %Jgj I4 <J^cl lit a! _/ir jl ci*>- -u j^-I ^l V jl J Jy ^JJI J U^ ^.^ U*V 

E 

Ff. 390-446 : A discourse by Gregory Nazianzen, on a Faithful Friend, signifying Gregory 
Nyssen, the brother of St. Basil. 



6o CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 

F 

Ff. 44&-61& : The Acts of St. Julian, the physician and martyr of Emesa, in the reign of 
Numerian. 
,j®\ dUI (sic) ^M ^j^^ *V* •*♦«-» ^ 4» «M afi\ *JJ1 OUI ^ cri-* 31 : ^ ^ 

G 

Ff. 620-726 : An anonymous discourse on the Sunday of the Deprivation of Flesh, in the 

Greek Church. . c . 

.juJuJt Uxdl L&-I o^j I* r ~U\ £j* v-jW -^ 

Ff. 726-786 : A discourse read on the Sunday of the Deprivation of Cheese in the Greek 
Church, by John Chrysostom. 

I 
Ff. 790-856 : A discourse by St. Ephrem on the Transfiguration of our Lord. 

.4,>li 3 tfy>V j^VI .JL.yd ^ u-jOJI jj.U j> ^ ^-M ^ J* f 1 ^ jU u-.^ 1 J ^ ^* 

J 

Ff. 860-920 : A discourse, by John Chrysostom, on the saying of our Lord : " Father, if 
thou be willing, let this cup pass away from me." 

K 
Ff. 920-1016 : A discourse, by Jacob of Serug, on the coUoquy between the good malefactor 
crucified on the right side of our Lord and the angel who guarded Paradise. 

to uj« **& of J® ^ ** <>. ^ ^ t*^ ^ &s ^ **"- ^ Jj5 °" 

.U-3>jl\ Ji*< jS" ^J}\ ifcUl 
L 
Ff . 1016-1136 : The history of the Prophet Elijah, the Tishbite, and how God took him up 
to Heaven alive. 

.LJI Jl jU 0* *f j* J* \r W ^ ^ 5 ts^ 1 ^ ^ trt^' •-£" -^" 

M 
Ff . 1136-1476 : The Acts of John the Evangelist, attributed to his disciple, the deacon 
Prochorus, who is said to be related to St. Stephen Protomartyr. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 61 

Begins : ,/>. ^ J& oLJ-l ^ ^J\ ^ ol^JI Jl 411 ^1 gj j^J Uj ^ a.. 

The following sub-headings are found in the text : 

(i) Fol. 131a : On the composition of the sacred Gospel when our Lord Jesus Christ made 

manifest His grace. . 

(2) Fol. 133& : On the sorcerer Notitianus (sic). 

(3) Fol. 1356 : The return of John to Ephesus. 

(4) Fol. 137a : On Drusiana, the wife of Andronicus. 

Incomplete at the end. The last words are : & ly»U- fcUl „a» J* jVI Jl j^fcU- <y \ 

M c£> ji* j J o>; as ^i ^1 y*i :iyi ^ 

All the above treatises are written in one hand, a clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1260. 
Headings in red. The folios are numbered in writing by a later hand at the top of the pages. 
This hand must have been that of a Melchite, because on ff. 7™ and 74-75, the Syriac letter 

Kof is used to indicate 100. ( . 

' Thirty-seven leaves seem to have disappeared from the beginning of the Mb., as the nrst 

numbered folio is 38. 

Fairly broad margins, some of which are damaged. 

On fol 78& the copyist has written his name in a confused dtwdm hand, which has been 
rendered almost illegible by age. The words " Isaac " and " Ilyas " may be detected dimly 

An owner has written in pencil on the margins of fol. 59" the list of some bishops of the town 

On fol. 107a an unskilled European hand has written : " Padre Domine Jesu Christu NoVenA 
Ei Spiritu Santo," with a drawing which looks like a fish. 

From an inscription on the margins of fol. 101a we learn that in about a.d. 1500 the Mb. 
belonged to a priest Mansur. A later owner is the priest Paul Rizk, who wrote his name on the 
fly-leaf at the beginning. 

N 

Ff. 1480-1636 : A theological treatise by the Melchite writer Paul Rahib, bishop of Sidon, 
originally from Antioch, who flourished in the thirteenth Christian century. 

Title : U2p aIUj , The Mental Treatise. 

Begins : JU-iYI U- oiL-l jji-l ~»\J\ j^y. l»bi» V s * ; >* ^ Uj • * ' 

An index to the work is found on ff . I48«-I49a. 

The work is divided into 22 babs, the first of which begins, on fol. 149a : >yr> j JjVl ^Ul 

.oui u ^ STu . . . f~j\ ^J\ r ^ *& ^ jM ^ ^ * ^ ' JU " ^ 

The 22nd bab begins, on fol. 160b : j/jJtj J^U^VI *> j^\ 3 W j] iiSj^S jUI yUl 



62 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

O 

Ff. 1636-1790 : A treatise by the same bishop of Sidon, Paul Rahib, on the differences in 
religious belief between the various peoples of the world, with special reference to the Jews 
who embraced Christianity willingly. 

IfiU. £-ltfj U&JI ^jy^\ Jc ^Vl I4. ojp^^JI jU-\ ^ ^lUVI Iju- ^-1 o^ 1 v*ijll ^^ 

Ends (fol. 179a) : ^JJI l*jj Uilj -uL^l lijjkj IU* 4, 451 fil U tfj^j jU^VI J-JI ^Ijl UjIj 

p 

Ff . 1790-1940 : A treatise by the same Bishop Paul Rahib addressed to one of his Muslim 
friends of Sidon. 

Headed : juL-JI ^ lju* ^jJI a,Uju»I j*, Jl <!Lj J\Uyi l4-# ^ii-l J^Ul ^-jtfl v->IJ» o* 1 ^ 

Ends : <>.l-I a.j (^--^ y*.> juJUl uj 4P Jui-lj •'j^** d^ri *-^* jV^" 

Q 

Ff . 1940-1976 : A treatise on the differences between the religious beliefs of the various 
Christian communities, by the same Paul Rahib. 
jLjll \Jm : ^jUjJI ja ^jUiJ! JyJ! Jc Jo. Jy ^/llaiVI l-u-> w»*-i JiUI ^Jdfll i-*ljM ^^J 

Many leaves are missing between ff. 194-195. 

R 

Ff . 195&-1976 : A short treatise by the same Paul Rahib, in which he explains the Christian 
doctrine of the Unity of God and of the Incarnation to a Muslim correspondent called Abu 
Surur. 

4} rju jl fij\ tr Jdl jj^JI j.1 ^jJI aJL U JIUVI iju-.s-ii-l ^.Jill J^U! ^aIJ! ^^Jj 

S 
Ff. 1976-2280 : A series of ten miracles performed by St. George. 

The first miracle deals with a Muslim who saw a wonderful vision in the church dedicated 
to St. George. 

The last miracle is incomplete at the end. 

The MS. is dated (fol. 1976) Monday, the 5th October, of the year 1566 of the Greeks (a.d. 
1255), and written in the town of Sidon by Haraj, son of the Wazir (Vizier) Nicholas. The 
MS. is thus contemporary with the author. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 63 

M W-^ & tl^ { &* • • ■ ^-v" Sx r ***. V ^ a 1 &^" ^^ ^" J1 "^ ^ ^ 

The second part of the MS. (ff. 148-228) is written in an old Syrian Naskhi hand bordering 

on Kufi. Headings in red. 

Ff. 158-153 and ff. 161-166 are supplied by a sixteenth-century hand. 

Fol 166& is mostly occupied with notes by early owners and readers, one of whom is John, 

son of the deacon <Isa 'Uwaisat (oL y ^ w^ *» ^x) who finished readin e the book 
on Saturday, the 18th October, in the year 7115 of Adam (a.d. 1607). 

On fol. 218* the name of an early owner is given in a marginal inscription as John. 

The folios of the MS. are numbered in Melchite Syriac characters but not in the ordinary 

Abjad numbering. [Mingana Chr. Arab. 83.] 

45. 

231 x 158 mm. 161 leaves. Generally thirteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff . 36-56 : The twenty-three canons of the one hundred and fifty bishops who assembled 
in Constantinople (or the first Council of Constantinople) against Macedonius. 

>IS3I u-^jJL. \ rJ *\ 3 UULJ\ a* 1^1 a^ -*" 1 *"** i - Ul fl^ 1 f - Vl ^ ' ' ' 

B 

Fol. 6 : A short account of the heretics, from the beginning to the time of the Council of 
Chalcedon. . ,. . ... . m . .„ ■ , , 

c 

Ff 7M8a : A theological work containing the prophecies of the prophets concerning the 
Incarnation! and quotations from the Bible, the Fathers and the Councils ^once^ the true 
Christological belief (which, according to the author, is that of the Coptic Monophysite Church), 
together with a short account of the Councils and the heresies that gave rise to them. 

u, ;^\yi *>UI f Js -cy ^4} cH 1 Ua r- Jjrf ^ Jl . . . fcaJi o> \™ *W o* ■ ■ • 

.y JLM + *UM >* ^ r 4 a* ^ ^ ***** c 1 ^ 1 ^ ° f Uj5 ' * • ^ ^ UVl ** 

The work is divided into four babs, the second 1 of which begins on fol. 146 : C ^ j WI ^ 
M JUI J Ijys. ^1 i-odl IVI SU ; the third on fol. 23a : ^J\ 0*" <yJ ^^ > <j JWI *V ! 

y WJ; and the" fourth on fol. 34* : fc» * UVI ^> j ^ U -^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 
In this 6a6 there is a quotation from Ignatius of Antioch (fol. 346). 

Ff . 526-55* contain a chronological note about the birth of Christ and the Passover. 

1 The first 656 begins on fol. 76. 



64 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

D 

Ff . $ga-6ga : The twelve Anathemas of Cyril of Alexandria, with a commentary : 

•VjOC-VI 6jJ» J^UJI JjJ-1 ^J\ ytlD! ^J^T UJ l^j ^Jl j^ JN\ #u}\ j^ 

E 
Ff. joa-jib : The twelve theological " Chapters " composed by Gregory Nyssen. 

.(sic) L_y_ ^_ii-l tXst^yU^ y>Uall JLJl l*-^.? ^ t/lj y^c- ^Vl j^A . . • 

F 

Ff. 72tf-78« : A theological work treating of the right belief in the Trinity and the Incarnation. 

Begins : <_~~- . d^L. Ijj,^ Uy jl c^jj <i is^y ciT Li* *V^' c^ ^' ^ <^L. U o,*^ 

.o-jJUll ^jjbl jlcVlj ^jtjVI ^Vl UT $• 

G 

Ff . 79«-85fc : A short treatise on the Trinity and Unity of God, and on the Union between 
the Divinity and the Humanity of Christ. 

jv, lj_VJ\ i)j£dl *i* J»V 4mJ\ igJ** oj&3 \e tillij *X»-y3 $\ (sic) >l^iS \ Jy* Ij^c- . . . 

The work is divided into ten chapters. 

H 

Ff. 866-95^ : Another treatise on the Trinity and the Incarnation. 

^Lc- iS ^ ( j*-\ 4$\ Sf\ rc— Ji f^— '. <->_^l »_^->-l r-Vl 1^1 . . . p*x*-y3 ^\ .JUI £*J£r ry*} • • • 

,<t\Js3 S&e 

I 

Ff. 96a-ioifc : A treatise containing the differences in the theological beliefs and the 
ecclesiastical customs of the different Christian communities : the Copts, the Melchites, the 
Armenians, the West Syrians, the Nestorians and the Nubians (Abyssinians). 

Begins : «»jf- 03* Ja )3 m >, ( s *' c ) ly-^j jus*.— J I (sic) ejLaill »_ *)^> .v -UlU Js *» tio^»il l» ojTi 

j 

Ff. ioiZj-io4« contain miscellaneous subjects, among which we may mention (1) the good 
qualities of John the Baptist and of John, son of Zebedee, (2) the names of the parents of 
Melchizedek, (3) the reason why no Mass is said on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 
of the Holy Week, (4) the names of the shepherds who went to Bethlehem at the birth of Christ. 
They are said in the MS. to have been six in number. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 65 

K 

Ff. 1050-1366 : A treatise against the Jews, in which it is proved from the Old Testament 
that Jesus Christ is the true Messiah spoken of in the Jewish Scripture. 

Begins (fol. 105a) : ^--Jl JuJI Jc- UVI Jy j* >~* y U dU ^^1 jl 4il 4o,J ^J-l l*_t ^!L ^ 
Ends (fol. 1366) : i-l Cr Jl.j J^tJl A .U)f ^ oUj ^-Jl klL dilif 
Fol. 1080 is blank, owing to a lacuna in the original MS. 

L 

Ff. 1376-1436 : A treatise containing the explanation of the statement found in the 
prophet Isaiah to the effect that the sun and the moon would show a brighter light at the coming 
of the Messiah. 
^^Jl j j^ W/.lj >{* *Uj» ^jy jl ^1 Uil aJU ^ill ^illj cr *All jj-ir I4J £-5 ill* . . . 

.j^I 4 
M 
Ff. 1446-1516 : A treatise containing the history of the twelve Apostles and the countries 
which they evangelised, and in which they died. 

.I4, \yt3?3 W^ hj** t^ 1 *5*J'i *4»l*ilj _/^ ts*»*VI J-JI »l~-l 
Paul and John the Baptist are also mentioned in this treatise. 

N 
Ff . 1516-1590 : The names of the seventy disciples and the countries which they evangelised. 



Fol. 159 contains miscellaneous subjects : (1) the number of women called Mary found in 
the Gospels. These are said in the MS. to have been six in number ; (2) the names of the Magi. 

Dated (fol. 1600) Monday, 24th of the month of Kihak, of the year 1559 of the Martyrs 
(a.d. 1843), and written for the teacher John, son of David, from Arakhant in the district of 
Saul * by the priest-monk George, of the monastery of Abu Makar, in the desert of Shihat (Scete). 
The copyist mentions also the monastery of Muharrak. 
L-j iUi-j Ul\ »-. JjUI dUf j& cf cjj** M ^ j^*VI p, JjUl v b3l U» £\j o*3 

•vi JS 5 ...Jy* ^ ***>*• o> ^ *' ^ ^ ■ • • JjU1 ^- Vl ^ r*^ ^ ^ 



On the east bank of the Nile, to the south of Itfih (Atfih). 

5 



66 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

The above treatises of the MS. are divided by pages containing crude miniatures of the 
following Saints : 

Fol. 30 : St. Athanasius. 

Fol. ya : St. Peter. 

Fol. 586 : St. Cyrus (or Curius), riding a horse, and holding two swords in his hands. 

Fol. 696 : St. Gregory (probably Nyssen, as a treatise by him follows on the next page). 

Fol. ySb : St. Rhipsime, the holy woman. 

Fol. 86a : The Archangel Gabriel. 

Fol. 956 : St. Macarius, the Egyptian. 

Fol. 104& : A representation of the Nativity. 

Fol. 137a : John the Dwarf (see below, p. 115). 

Fol. 144a : The Abbot Antony. 

Fol. 1606 : The Archangel Suriel, holding a spear. 

Fol. 161 a : The Abbot Isaac, and near him his disciple John. 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Ff. ib-za contain an index 

of the treatises found in the MS. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 71. J 

46. 

240 x 232 mm. 294 leaves of two columns. Generally from twenty-seven to thirty-one 

lines to the column. 

A theological encyclopaedia of Christian doctrine and mysticism, attributed in the MS. to 

a monk of the Black Mountain. 

The title of the work is : " The all-embracing book " (^U-l v bT), evidently a translation 

of the Greek iravheKTrjs. 

Headed : a^-VI Ji-l j^Ull jUJI J*. Jl y> Ju»1 of VI wiysJl ^J3l ^U-l yfcT 
The author of the work, who is not mentioned in the MS., was a monk who seems to have 
nourished in the eleventh Christian century. This is made clear in MS. 870 of Paul Sbath, 1 
where we are also informed that the work was translated shortly after its composition from Greek 
into Arabic, from an autograph of the author which had two columns to the page, and was 
written in minuscules. 2 

The work is divided into sixty-three makdlahs. Before the beginning of a makalah there 

is the heading : " The opening of the makalah " (<JUJI <£\s) 

The work mainly consists of quotations from the Bible, early Synods, and Fathers of the 
Church. I give below the translation of the first line of the long headings of the first seven 
makdlahs, with the list of the Fathers, etc., quoted in them. 

1 Biblioihbque de Manuscrits Paul Sbath, vol. ii., p. 82. 

2 According to Cheikho, Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chr Mens, pp. 208-209, the author was called 
Nikon, and was "an archimandrite of the monastery of St. Simeon Thaumaturgus, from Antioch," who nourished in the 
second half of the nth century. This Nikon is mentioned also by Assemani (Bibl. Orient. I, p. 620), who describes another 
book by him, entitled Typicon. From the quotation found in Paul Sbath's catalogue (ibid., p. 82), we infer that there were 
two books entitled " wavSeVnjs," the large mvMjcrqff, which is represented in the present MS., and the small iravBexrijs previously 
written by a monk of the monastery of St. Saba, called Antiochus. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 67 

Ff. ia-6a contain an index to the work. 

Ff. 6b-8a : The first makalah, which contains the introduction. 

Ff. 8b-iSb : The second makalah, which exhorts to the careful reading of the sacred Books, 
and the right understanding of their meanings. 
The Fathers quoted are : * 

(a) John Chrysostom (fol. 8b), from his commentary on Matthew. 

(b) Anastasius, bishop of Mount Sinai (fol. gb), on the demon mentioned in the Book of 
Job. 

(c) St. Theodosius (fol. 96). 

(d) St. Maximus (fol. 10a), on the difficult passages of the Bible. 

(e) St. Macarius (fol. 10a). 

(/) Basil of Caesarea (fol 10b). 

(g) St. Athanasius (fol. 11a). 

(h) Isaac, presumably of Antioch (fol. 11a). 

(i) St. Ephrem (fol. 130). 

(j) St. John of Damascus (fol. 156), from his treatise on the Heretics. 

Ff. i8b-2ib : The third makalah, on the explanation of the Commandments of the Lord. 
The Fathers quoted are : 

(a) John Chrysostom (fol. 19a), from his discourse on the Holy Spirit (fol. 19b), and from 
his commentary on the Epistle to the Colossians (fol. 20b). 

(b) Basil of Caesarea (fol. 21a), from his commentary on Isaiah. 

(c) Isidore (of Pelusium ?) (fol. 21b). 

(d) St. Ephrem (fol. 21b). 

(e) John Climacus (fol. 21b). 

Ff. 22a-$ob : The fourth makalah on forsaking the world. 
The Fathers and the ecclesiastical books quoted are : 

(a) John Chrysostom, from his commentary on Matthew (fol. 22a), from his commentary 
on the Epistle to the Ephesians (fol. 226), and from his commentary on John (fol. 22b). 

(b) St. Basil of Caesarea (fol. 22b), from his ascetical writings. 

(c) St. Barsanuphius (fol. 230). 

(d) St. Basil (fol. 23a), from his ascetical writings. 

(e) Nineteenth Canon of the Seventh Council (fol. 24a). 

(/) Canons of the Council of Constantinople, held in the Church of the Apostles (fol. 24b). 
{g) From a book of mystical quotations from the Fathers, entitled Patrikon (or " Paradise 
of the Fathers ") (fol. 24b). 

(h) St. Basil (fol. 25a), from his ascetical writings. 

(i) From the Patrikon (fol. 256). 

(j) More Canons of the same Council of Constantinople (fol. 26a). 

(k) St. Basil (fol. 26a), from his ascetical writings. 

(/) The Fortieth Canon of the Sixth Council (fol. 27a). 

(m) Ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 276). 

1 1 refer only to the Fathers whose names are written in red. 



68 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(n) St. Ephrem (fol. 286). 

(0) St. Saba (fol. 286). 

y>) From the Patrikon (fol. 286). 

(q) John Climacus (fol. 29a). 

(r) St. Ephrem (ff. 290-300). 

(s) The Testament of Theodore Studita (fol. 30a). 

(t) From the heretical writings of the Messalians (fol. 30a). 

(u) Epiphanius of Cyprus (fol. 30&), on pseudo-Apostles. 

(v) Six Canons of the Council of Gangra (fol. 306). 

(w) From the Civil Laws (fol. 30b). 

Ff . 310-320 : The fifth makalah, on the meaning of monasticism : 
(0) John Chrysostom (fol. 31a), from his commentary on Philemon. 

(b) Ignatius of Antioch (fol. 31a), from his letter to Polycarp of Smyrna. 

(c) From the ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 316). 

(d) The Eighty-second Canon of the Apostles (fol. 31b). 

(e) The Fourth Canon of Chalcedon (fol. 316). 

(/) The Third Canon of the Synod of Gangra (fol. 316). 
(g) From the Civil Laws (fol. 316). 

Ff. 320-360 : The sixth makalah, on the fact that those who segregate themselves from the 
world for an earthly benefit are rejected by God : 

(a) From the ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 32a). 

(b) St. Ephrem (fol. 326). 

(c) From the Patrikon (fol. 326). 

(d) John Chrysostom (fol. 330). 
\e) St. Ephrem (fol. 336). 

(/) Gregory Nazienzen (fol. 336). 

(g) John Climacus (fol. 13b). 

(h) St. Ephrem (fol. 34a). 

(i) From the ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 34a). 

(j) John Climacus (fol. 34a). 

(k) The Third and the Fourth Canons of the above Council of Constantinople (fol. 34a). 

(I) From the Civil Laws (fol. 346). 

(m) The Eightieth Canon of the Council of Carthage (fol. 34b). 

(n) St. Theodore (probably Studita) (fol. 34b). 

(0) From the ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 35ft). 

[p) From the Civil Laws (fol. 36a) . 

Ff . 36^-39^ : The seventh makalah, on those who cause schism : 

(a) John Chrysostom (fol. 36a), from his commentary on Matthew. 

(b) St. Athanasius (fol. 36b). 

(c) St. Ephrem (fol. 36b). 

(d) Anastasius of Sinai (fol. 366). 

(e) From the ascetical writings of St. Basil (fol. 36b) . 



MINGANA COLLECTION 69 

if) John Chrysostom, from his commentary on St. Matthew (fol. 37a). 

(g) From a letter of St. Simeon Thaumaturgus (Stylites ?) to a hermit (fol. 37a). 

(h) Maximus (fol. 376). 

(i) Barsanuphius (fol. 376). 

(j) Abbot Mark (fol. 37b). 

(k) Anastasius of Sinai (fol. 376). 

(I) John Chrysostom (fol. 38a), from his commentary on Matthew. 

The first makalah begins : .l^i- £*-'J* J~^" v 1 ^ 11 J 1 ^j^' M v 1 ^ 1 ^^ i**J J^VI illS-Jl 
The last makalah (fol. 286ft) begins : <^\ oU» >> J <^' <&- cs*-> 'J^ 1 -' ^ ^^ 

.^ ,/LJij ^jai o>teJi jOJi &* Jtjf^ { o* » <y $ ip vfufw ^ £*> 

Dated (fol. 294a) 15th June, a.d. 1864 : ji* cr *U- ^ V U^JI dUl <ic v b3l \±* <^U oLf 

.L^w \au <*- .^Vi a~^U ^ilVb ilcUl ju jjcJlj JUjVI *L- j^p j* ^all dUj 9 " >^ 0* Uj» 

Written in a clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters and 
sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Black rulings in the main part of the MS., but red 

towards the beginning. r> 

5 [Mingana Chr. Arab. 80.] 

47. 

277 x 194 mm. 214 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 
The homilies and sermons of John Chrysostom. 

The first two sermons and the first part of the third are missing at the beginning, and the 
MS. is also incomplete at the end. 

There are thirty-four makdlahs in the MS. and three sermons, but the beginning of the first 

sermon is missing between ff . 211 and 212. 

The fourth makalah begins (fol. 4b) : J&A ISI USi V ^1 *jjk Jy J* V> <*>)J l *^ 

,d J^ £~ ISIj j'UVi 



The last makalak begins (fol. 199a) : olO\c ^ jJUl AiLljVI.* i&\ UVI ^ JjSdlj *-IJI 3UJI 

.4rVyu >1 ^j (JUI JjUj jJLi II* & Jai jl ^1 ^ j-uffl <~J>l U cJJ ^oll li» U*l 

The third sermon, which is the last in the MS., begins (fol. 2146) : J-ill Jc toy £)bl aUI 

.d!S ^ ;il>ll J f jtfJI J* dy~*ty) oUlJI jyO& jtoll cX? J* J*^. j^ill £>j)l ^l>l c^^ 1 

No date. Written in a clear and well-spaced Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1760; Headings 
in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 82.] 



70 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

48. 

206 x 147 mm. 202 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 
n ^- he ^ 0m i lie ^ of St J° hn Chrysostom, translated from Greek and arranged by Athanasius IV 
TOle d ° X Patriarch of Antioch, who died in Aleppo in 1724. 

THE CHOSEN PEARL OF JOHN CHRYSOSTOM 

Begins : . . . ^| BVlj fJ CJ1 V VIJ^ ^ . . . dU ^ & f UVI ^ ^ ^JJl 41 ^ 
. . . 4\>jj ^Ul ^ ^Udl j| rf>Jj <iL (j5 ^ j, ; jlr ^, (f&) .^ . . ^jj, ^ u^j ^, 

The book is divided into thirty-four mafrsfofe, of which there is an index on fol. 3 at the 
beginning and on fol. 202 at the end. 

The homilies deal with the following subjects : 

(1) Fol. 40 : On education of children. 

(2) Fol. 126 : On those who are attracted by the beauty of women. 

the SaLfmentf = ^ ^ ^ **** ** Sh ° Uld n0t n6gleCt ^ deSpise the Church ° f Christ and 
gloJ 45 F ° L ^ ' ° n ^ faCt that We Sh ° Uld n0t f6ar a man Wh0 has obtained wealth and 

^T? l 24 "^ thirt y- two leaves are missing, on which stood four homilies. 
(9) ±<ol 286 : On confession and penitence. 

(10) Fol. sjb : On envy and hatred. 

(11) Fol. 41a : On rancour and enmity. 

(12) Fol. 45a : On remembrance and forgetfulness of evil done to us 

(13) Fol. 48ft : On love. 

(14) Fol. 556 : On alms. 

the m2L F0L ?6b : ° n diVlne manifestation t0 those who leave the Church before the end of 
(16) Fol. 86a : On prayer. 

th. cfT? le Tl are , missin ^ between ff • 86 " 8 7- On one of these leaves stood the beginning of 
the seventeenth homily, on virtue and vice. 8 8 

(18) Fol. 04& : On oath. 

(19) Fol. gyb : On penitence, Eucharist and Day of Judgment 

(20) Fol. 1006 : On continual preaching. ' ° 

(21) Fol. ma : On death and the end of the world. 

(22) Fol. 1180 : On humility and justice. 

(23) Fol. 1216 : On soul and hope. 

(24) Fol. 1246 : On the eternity of the torments. 

(25) Fol. 128a : On poverty. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



7i 



(26) Fol. 136a: : On the prescience and providence of God. 

(27) Fol. 142a : On the penitence of David. 

(28) Fol. 1466 : On penitence, fasting, and on Jonah the Prophet. 

(29) Fol. 154a : On penitence. 

(30) Fol. 161a : On prayer and supplication. 

(31) Fol. 1706 : On penitence and alms. 

(32) Fol. 179a : On illness and doctors. 

(33) Fol. 1830 : On the Ten Virgins. 

(34) Fol. iS8a : On false prophets, heretics, and signs of the end of the world. It is stated 
that this is the last homily of Chrysostom, which he pronounced shortly before his death. 

Dated (fol. 201ft), in a half-obliterated colophon, Tuesday, 14th April, a.d. 1814, and written 
by Gabriel, son of Yaunan 'Ashikah : j* b\j&\ j£> . . . &i>lc jU_y_ j, J-fl^ J&\ JJJJI .ju *5Ae 

li-L- X~£ ja v iJVl Jm j^c- 4jm jtj ilclc <l- Jy+l* ^ jLJ ^ jLc p\J\ *yh} *tyS\ jl^ o^Cll iJift ifcT 

.JV.I JuVI Jl J&cJ\ 4 (£JJI rc~*J\ Py~,_ lLal£j 

This work, which "contains the homilies of St. John Chrysostom, is not mentioned by Cheikho 
in his Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chretiens, pp. 25-26, as having been arranged 
by the Greek Orthodox Patriarch Athanasius, but is wrongly placed by him (on p. 219 of the 
same book) as by John Chrysostom himself. 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red, but titles of makdlahs in thick black characters. 
Profusely rubricated. A few words here and there damaged by damp. 

The copyist states, in an inscription on fol. 202ft, that it took him thirty-five days to tran- 
scribe the work. Another inscription, by a different hand, is to the effect that anyone who 
peruses the manuscript and does not offer prayers for its scribe, will be cursed by the Holy 

Church. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 3.] 

49. 

204 x 144 mm. 171 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The work on Christian Faith, divided into one hundred makdlahs, by Johannes Damascenus, 
or St. John of Damascus. 

Ji oVyull ply I j\*y JcUll Jl (sic) il^Jlj oVyJIj y*l^l j* icyJl UyJI aIUu UJl otf 

, t5 ii*jJl J&\ U»-_y_ jj-Jutt! j^aj p~~ J! py* li-u- Jl cjj-JJI £-»wJI $*y\ <**\j>3 jU^Jl 

An index of the makdlahs is found on ff. ift-4ft. The first makdlah begins (fol. 5a) : J/Vl aIUJI 
.y UV! UJl <JL- ,J \f ,i*J jl ^ ^J jl ^ tf.pl ^ JU-j Jjlr 411 Jl ^ UtU (TjSI «UVI ^ 

The last makdlah begins (fol. 168a) : jJL. jl .J^i jl tiL*- .g~»J1 jjL. J j^.- Jlj a~-UI flUJI 

.Jl jl 4) ^sJb £;— J' 

In reality the work has only ninety-nine makdlahs. 

Dated Saturday, 19th September, a.d. 1836, and written in Mardin by Yaunan, son of 

George Yaunan Sa'Id of Mardin, in the presence of his teacher, the deacon Isaac Shukri of 
Mosul, in the time of the West Syrian Uniat Patriarch Julius Antony Samhiri. 



72 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

^Ij j dJy\53i ji^Ji ^jj- j <-jjJ1 j dUs j^ j-p j^-i u-^ -^ : >- ^ Jv-> UI 

.y aLJI ^Ijj ^jjL jl>> cjj^—JI c/*?>»l cT*?jt c5-> U • • • ^ 

Clear but not beautiful Mesopotamian Naskhi. The headings " makalah " in thick black 
characters, and all other headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 8.] 

50. 

277 X 195 mm. 150 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

On fol. \a the following general title is given to the work : u/%. J*** I* J ^Vl Jy (j** 
g r J\ • ** VJUJt^j Uj oj-tij , " Collection of sayings of the Fathers, concerning the divinity and 
humanity of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ." 

A 

Fol. 3a : The 100 questions of Caesarius, 1 the brother of Gregory Nazianzen, translated in 
the year 6565 (a.d. 1052) by the Syrian Melchite writer 'Abdallah ibn al-Fadl, who died about 
A.D. 1053. 

.nolo a**- j J-^ #' ^ *■* h^ 

On fol. 6a begin the 100 questions of the above Caesarius. 

.y u-^jLT ^jfll c -JI &f- l«K- ur 41 ^ i - U1 ^ 
The treatise ends abruptly on fol. 32a with the fiftieth question. It is therefore incomplete. 

B 

Ff . 326-33(1 are blank. 

Ff . 336-386 : A work which contains quotations from the Fathers of the Church before the 
Council of Chalcedon, in favour of two Natures and one Person in Christ. 

: j^UI >S>-3 \j#}\ I*-* ^1 Jp3&-\ ^>cJl JJ Ijj*j jjJdl <~J&\ iS A»* jw-ui! AVI oidUi 

The Fathers quoted are : 

(1) Athanasius of Alexandria, from his book Against Apollinarius (fol. 336), from his Pro- 
fession of Faith (fol. 336), from his treatise On the Incarnation (fol. 34a), from his Answer to 
Antiochus (fol. 34a). 

(2) Cyril of Alexandria, from his Letter to Sukius (sic) (fol. 346) : \jy jUSL-l u»-l cfyy 

(Succensus ?), from his Letter to Nestorius (fol. 346), from his Letter to Theodosius (fol. 346), and 
from his Letter to John of Antioch (fol. 35«). 

(3) Gregory Nazianzen, from his Twenty-sixth Discourse (fol. 356). 

1 Cf. Pat. Gr., vol. xxxviii., pp. 851-1190. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 73 

(4) Theophilus of Alexandria, from his Letter to the Bishops of Egypt (fol. 36a), and from his 
Commentary on John (fol. 36b). 

(5) Basil of Caesarea, from his Twenty-fifth Discourse (fol. 370) and from his Treatise against 
Eunomius (fol. 37a). 

(6) Justin Martyr, from his Explanation of the Faith (fol. 37a), and from his third book on 
Divinity (or Theology) (fol. 376). 

(7) Epiphanius of Cyprus, from his book Ancoratus (fol. 37b). 

(8) St. Ephrem, from his discourse On the Transfiguration (fol. 38a). 

(10) St. Augustine, from his 130th discourse On the Five Loaves of the Gospel (fol. 386) . 

(11) Amphilochius of Iconium, from his Commentary on John. 

(9) Ambrose of Milan, from his discourse On the Incarnation (fol. 38a). 
The treatise is incomplete at the end. 

C 

Ff. 396-540 : Treatise in favour of the Christian Tradition, especially in its relation to the 
Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and the Eucharist. 

.J-JI UrtaL. e_jJu- ^JJI jJLJIj juUJI I4. c~i o^U^ . . . 

Incomplete at the end. 

D 
. Ff . 546-550 are blank. 

Ff. 556-606 : A treatise containing the answer of Mas'ad, Chorepiscopus of Alexandria, 
concerning the true belief in the Incarnation. This Mas'ad is Mas'ad Nushii, Greek Orthodox 
writer from Damascus, who taught in Egypt in the second half of the eighteenth century. 

Incomplete at the end. 

E 
Fol. 610 is blank. 

Ff. 616-650 : A treatise against the Roman Catholic doctrine of Purgatory, by the above 
Chorepiscopus Mas'ad, which he composed in February, a.d. 1778. 
^ju: j^A^J! j^V kz^ . . . yti a— . ^j^-l . . . vJdlr a-lill yj&t jJ*-.UI >1~ J* ->j 

X»*~~a \YVA 3U J»lA ^ ►Usl J <^i> • • • jJU-jUI 

F 
Ff. 650-660 : Letter sent in a.d. 1778, by the above Chorepiscopus Mas'ad Nushu, in 
answer to Nicholas Fir'aun, brother of Michael Jamal. 
J*U >& ►IjuI j jJLl JJU* y-l Oj*jJ Vyi J! Ujj. . . . ysi 4— ^j/i ^ Ul* 3Uj . . . 

,\VVA *a- 
G 
Ff. 666-680 : Letter sent by the above Chorepiscopus Mas'ad, to Sophronius, Patriarch 
of Constantinople, on the occasion of the latter 's accession to the See of Constantinople. 



74 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

H 

Fol. 686 is blank. 

Ff . 690-890 : A controversy that took place in writing in a.d. 1755, between the above 
Chorepiscopus Mas'ad, and the priest Michael b. a. 'Arraj, on the subject of the Purgatory of 
the Latin Church. 

Ff . 836-890 contain an Appendix to the same controversy, by the aforesaid Chorepiscopus 
Mas'ad. 

I 

Ff . 896-900 are blank. 

Ff. 910-1220 : A theological work by the above Mas'ad, against the doctrine of the Roman 
Catholic Church, especially against the Council of Florence. 

The work is divided into ten chapters, and begins with a question asked by a Roman 
Catholic, and answered by the aforesaid Mas'ad. 

Begins : ^J$\ tSyf&ft ^fr • • • *•*» ^3 <>X/jVt j^l j, Jc j»jl\ JJ ^ UJI w Ji_^ 

The first chapter begins (fol. 936) : ^ >=- ^JJI *ljl o"*^ 1 W ^ °V j -^ ^ ! 

J 

Ff. 1226-1276 : A treatise on the fact that a Christian is to keep himself from blood and 
from things strangled. 

XJU Vj fcy£ Vj to j^-Jl Jfl jl jjg U <il ^ . . . 

K 
Ff. 1280-1290 are blank. 

Ff . 1296-1480 : A treatise on the fact that the heavenly beatitude is given to the saints after 
the general resurrection from the dead, and not before, by the above Mas'ad Nushu. 



<— '& jl .<*jJu)l . . . y^i -u~* isJy-\ • • • J-^l y"Vl l*»*- j>— «_jLflJI ioL-< wjl ^ <^-L« uo . . . 

.<*U1 <*U!1 a- j^Sj lei jJ-Oj jJ-UU IljUeJl jl j&~ jJ> iXJy&l j^-Jl 

The work is divided into forty-two sections, containing quotations from the Bible and the 
Fathers of the Church, to prove the author's view-point. 

Ff. 1456-1460 are blank, owing to the fact that part of sections 38 and 40, and all section 39, 
are missing, possibly because they were wanting in the original from which the copyist was 
transcribing. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 75 

Dated (fol. 1496) 12th of Amshir, of the Coptic year 1600, the 22nd of Rabi' II., a.h. 1301, 
and 19th February, a.d. 1884, and written by Shalabi Joseph. 

A clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black or purple char- 
acters, and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. On fol. 20 is a figure 
of the Cross, surmounted by a pattern in the shape of a bird, resembling old Egyptian drawings. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 38.] 



51. 

281 x 208 mm. 191 leaves. Generally from seventeen to nineteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 16-1340 : A theological work on Trinity, Incarnation, Holy Spirit, and many points 
dealing with the Economy of our Lord. Title : 

THE PRECIOUS PEARL CONCERNING THE EXPLANATION OF THE BELIEF IN RELIGION 

There is no author's name in the MS., but he was the Coptic writer Abu Bishr Severus, Bishop 
of Ashmunain (or Ushmunain), called Ibn al-Mukaffa', who nourished towards the end of the 
tenth Christian century. 

wtj ct*.^ j^ [ ^J^ ^ A ^ *. ^ * k - <y- M 4 ^ Vl C 1 ^- 1 4 **' jJ1 ^ " ' 

The work is divided into fifteen bdbs, which deal successively with : 

1) Trinity. 

2) Our Lord's birth of the Virgin. 
'3) The truth of the Incarnation. 

4) Our Lord's baptism by John. 

5) His temptation. 

6) His works as recorded in the Gospels. 

7) His Passion. 

8) His giving up the ghost. 

9) The blood and water that came out of His side. 

10) His descent into Hades. 
n) His resurrection. 

12) His ascension. 

13) His second coming. 

14) The Paraclete. 

15) The equality of the Persons of the Trinity. 



76 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 

The first bab begins (fol. 3") : r>h **> ^l ^ ■**« *J> W ^ V J ' V1 ^ ** 

The last 6*6 begins (fol. 127a) : jU ^ -VI .^aiJl *jH* ^ J-V ^ ^ -V 1 

B 

Ff . 134^-1426 : The twelve Anathemas of Cyril of Alexandria, with a commentary. 

Uju djj. J4l J-M ^ Wj ^ y* ^ ^ C* -^ JL " ^ ° r> - ^ ' ' " KH 
The headings are : f >! and ^l . The subscription is : ^J\ y*l J* ^ cT.»j» ^ 



C 



Ff . i43«-i55& : Treatise on the Incarnation, apparently by the above Severus ibn al- 
Mukaffa'. ' 

Begins : jUVI jl AVI IJtt ju-dl ^ 4.Y! Jy d* £r? &* - aUj1j ^ °* ^ .' " 



D 



Ff 1556-1916 : An extensive work on the Messianic prophecies of the Old Testament, on 
the Christian faith as preached by the Apostles, on the introduction of heresies mto the Church, 
and on the history of the Councils and the events that took place after them. ( 

No author's name is mentioned in the work, but he was the above Severus ibn al-Mukatta . 

U^ j^t a* Jl ^ cT * ^ u* \™ ^ G* *f* *~ J JU ^ ** <f* * ' * 

JW >. j Jl>Vl^ J^Vl Ale wUl iJ« ^ ijfr V. c^j 5UV Ji>i ^ *-kj» ^ «*-*•" 

.^1 ^ VJ « Vf Jl f ^ ■& *¥•" c^ >* t^b 

Begins : d&jj 451 ^^ J^ £)N ^ C^ 1 

Incomplete at the end, the last extant words being : d^h ^ cr^ 1 ^ ^ d ^- C 4 * 1 ^** 

The work is divided into ta&s, of which there are four in the MS., beginning on ff . 1560:, 1616, 

168a and 178a. , 

No date. Written in a bold and handsome Egyptian Naskhi of about 1480. bol. 1 supplied 

by a later hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly broad margins. Leaves 

numbered in Coptic numerals in the first part of the MS. 

[Mmgana Chr. Arab. 66.J 



MINGANA COLLECTION 77 

52. 

235 x 169 mm. 213 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The controversial work against the Jews and the Muslims, by the Monophysite Coptic 
writer Astat (Eustathius). Cf. Graf, Catalogue de Manuscrits, p. 199. 

j;±j\ ^»\j\ oU~i iu ^\ j*^) ^i v vi ^ t* *f* &~ 3 JL " ^ dr - ^ 

I do not know the precise year in which this author died, but he seems to have nourished 

in the twelfth Christian century. 

Another MS. of this work, dated 1018 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1301), is found in the collection 

of Paul Sbath, and is there numbered ion. 1 

A few lines ■ are missing at the beginning, after the title, on fol. lb. These were probably 
illegible in the original from which the present MS. is derived. The text begins abruptly : 

The MS. ends : g^lj j^JI 4 ^\ 4juV! <r> Jli ^ «rU* J/j <-J> r Jj uJ>. ^ij 

From the above quotations it appears that the MS. does not begin and end as that of Paul 

Sbath. 

The work is divided into four juz's, which begin as follows : 

Fol. 40a : ^- ^1 L*1 Jli . . . olVI M\ J ^ **\J\ ^ -^ c>* ^ ^ • • • 

Fol. 726 : J-liVI olji * J\ J.V-11 Jy Uj . . . wdjl 5U~I J^ u> ^\ 3 jA . . . 
Fol. 108a : U^ ^ Uw, j5 Uil ^ %I IJ* £U jl l& V Ul . . . ^IJI ;tU y^j* C U» ^ 
The author was a Monophysite, and upholds the Monophysite doctrine of the Incarnation, 
against both the Melchites (fol. 163a : jSU\ Jo gJ-1) and the Nestorians (fol. 167a : »J\ 

Dated (fol. 2136) Tuesday, 24th of the Coptic month Mesori, 1592 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1876), 
and written by Mark, a monk of the monastery of the Abbot Paul. 

d3j ^ 3 M ;bU! m fJt >»j*-l M j»j ~>»j« ^ v^ c^ 1 4>V" ^ ^ ^ f" 
.Vj, Ul AH ^Ul ^ jj> l>Uj -^ ^V j* V' r *. J* ^ *"* «*' ^^ ^ ^ ^~* 
Clear, bold, but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Broad margins. Leaves numbered in Coptic numerals. 

to [Mmgana Chr. Arab. 34.J 



» BibliotMque de Manuscrits Paul Sbath, vol. ii., p. 130. Cf. Abu' 1-Barakaf , Catalogue (edit. Riedel), p. 662. 

2 Four lines according to the MS. of Paul Sbath. 

» The beginning of the first Juz' is involved in the preceding lacuna of a few lines. 



7 8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

53. 

297 X 216 mm. 79 leaves. Thirty-one lines to the page. 
A voluminous philosophical and theological work entitled : 

jviJi Jy*£- £3*-** && J>^ (J*f 

COLLECTION OF THE PRINCIPLES OF FAITH 

The author's name is not mentioned in the MS., but he was the Coptic writer Mu'taman b. 
Fakhr ad-Daulah a. Fadl ibn al-'Assal, who lived in the middle of the thirteenth century. 

Begins : C >J1 J^, p\ J> alT U «itt ITu . . . ^>»j f«j-" iiJ1 ^X > Wi f ^ 

..jj^tJI >J^» f*\i-l «Jj^ w 

An index (ff. 46-70) follows the introduction. .„ . , 

The work is divided into five juz's, subdivided into seventy bobs. The present MS. is, how- 
ever, incomplete, and of these five juz's and seventy bobs, it only contains the first jm , with 

6 Tn addition to the seventy-nine written leaves, a considerable number of blank leaves are 
added at the end of the book, in order to complete the work, of which, as the copyist informs 
us (fol. 776), he was not able to find a complete text. 

For more details see the following MS. 

No date. Written in a clear and often vowelled Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1820. 
Headings hi red. "Well rubricated. Broad margins. 

See No. 54 [64]. [Mingana Chr. Arab. 53-1 

54. 

389 x 287 mm. 239 leaves. Twenty-two lines to the page. 

Another copy of the voluminous philosophical and theological work by the above Coptic 
writer Mu'taman b. Fakhr ad-Daulah a. Fadl ibn al-'Assal. 

See No. 53 [53]- 

Title (ff. la-Aa and 238a) : 

^viJl Jj-*5t fj+~*) <y^\ J^l £y& 

COLLECTION OF THE PRINCIPLES OF FAITH 

In the title on ff. 238a and 2386 the word " collection " (^f ) is omitted. 

Unlike the preceding copy, the index to the work (ff. 10-3&) precedes the introduction (ff. 

Aa-jb). 

The heading to the index is : ... J^Wl £jJl wiJlr jvSJI J_^ £j— * 3 <y^ J^ 1 fj^f ^ 

.JUI a \ Jj^Jl J-all (sic) &) ( $f\ &) 4>*11 J*r 
The heading to the introduction is : J^UJl ^il Utft a&H Ay**- fj*~*) o>^ Jy* JeS *+& 



MINGANA COLLECTION 79 

As stated above, the work is divided into five juz's, subdivided into seventy bobs, some of 
which have fasls or kisms. 

The work is sometimes controversial in character, but it gives fairly the opinion of leading 
writers who composed their books in Arabic, and who represented the three schools of thought : 
the Monophysite, the Diophysite and the Melchite. Complete sections by these writers are 
given. 

The juz's begin on ff. 8a, 8ya, nob, 1580:, 2196. 

Dated (fol. 238ft) Friday, 24th of the Coptic month Klhak, of the year 1596 of the Martyrs 
(a.d. 1880), and written in the monastery of the Abbot Paula (Paul), the first hermit, by the 
priest-monk Matthew for Rizk, father of the teacher George, 1 the agent of the monastery of the 
same Abbot Paula. 

J& U" 03j^3 f>}J\ iJjLJl -U.J-1 Ay_ i jVJJI J^-»l ,_>t£» <_>_}— i*Jl y»Ua)l »_jl53l IJjb •y, pl_/Jl il)^J 
lc-X>_ < JL« . . . jvSLvJl , rlxJij . . . jlfi»Vl *l-X^iA) <JaJ <>•— ~3 t-" il*— 3-3 >— ill iL- jip -.A JjLJl vil^o 

j*sl <iy-l_j ^^-jr <jh *r'y^' o^' r)" •••*•. 15*^^ < ^ «-V-*^'j yl^ll IA4. j*JIj . . . &>* **)l\> 

.y ^I^JI Jjl V_y. Ul jUl . . . Ujl jj> >U ^^J! 

The copyist states on fol. 239a that the present MS. has been carefully collated with another 
MS. preserved in the monastery of the Abbot Antony, and dated 1046 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1330), 
and with another MS. of the same monastery, dated 1564. 

.^j^Ul jv.1^1 Jc *9*&*j£j ells* j\Tj jc-j Awjl iL~i- ^ill l^tf-jlr ijldl <s*~jJIj 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. 
Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 64b.] 



55. 

113 x 87 mm. 8 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page in the first part, and fourteen in the 
second part. 

A 

Ff. ia-$a : A letter written to a certain George Dakkiir, 2 who had leaned towards the 
theological doctrine of the Franks (or Roman Catholicism), but who retraced his steps and went 
back to the religion of his fathers and repented before his bishop, Christodolus of Anwatij (sic), 
who preceded Bishop Alexander. 

Incomplete at the beginning. The subscription is : j/jJI iJ »>-jr J I SILJI 1* c^-y Uj 
Ul J-i»UI yVI jc cy jyli li-tj ylrj g*ljil <^^ Jl _p*>-.> ^v*" ^l-> cf" ^~ J ^*^~ «-^ "-**-? 

.(j*.jjj^£-! Lil JJ jo ^All «L*-UII ^Ji-l IJ 

1 See also about this man, No. 14 [65]. 

2 Is it a mistake for jjp JuJl , " above mentioned " ? 



8o CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 



B 



Ff. 3b-Sb : The Twelve Anathemas of Cyril of Alexandria against Nestorius. 

iui WJt J* P w <* «*- *»» ^ *V** ^ J* ^ ^ r^ ^ ^ r* ^ 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1750. No rubricates. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 77.] 

56. 

217 x 160 mm. 216 leaves. Thirteen and fourteen lines to the page. 

A. 
Ff . I«-I83* : The theological and controversial work entitled Antidote of ^ in the 
Science of the Principles and in the Hidden Mysteries of ChnsUamty, by the Copticjmter Peter 
Samanti, who lived in the middle of the thirteenth century and who .seems to have taken JJ. 
material from the works of his better-known contemporary, Mu'taman Abu al-Fadl ibn al- Assal 
A 2«S2Si indebtedness of the author Sadamanti to Ibn al-<Assal is found m the heading 
of the MS., which is : 
* j JyJ' JV* «-» ^ * ' b *» ^' ^ ^ ="* ^" ^ JU f, S rCT. v, 

The work is divided into a mukaddamah, three ask, and many/asfc and wotfyote. 

Begins : 4 g\ & . • • •*. * JW ^ ^ J r J U ^ ■""••• ftU "« ^' * ^ 

.U ^lUl v/ •^ ■ ■ • VM 1 & *> ii" J*" 1 . ^- Jl J -^' <i lj "** 

The man at whose instance the author wrote his book seems to have been Bishop Yusab, 
mentioned in 82 No. [20]. 

Ends : .j/f ~vVI Jl ^~i\ «-» C «» b U1 V C '-^ J ^ J1 4 yl - jVI "' JU 

Ff nw seqq. are devoted to a commentary on the Nicene Creed. 

The work often takes the line of a defence of Christianity against Islam Zow-ta-ja-a-d 
the early paganism of Greece and Rome. On ff. 27 and 44, the author wntes mterestmg things 
nhmif some Talismans and astrological facts. , . 

It is stated in the colophon, fol. 183, that the MS. was transcribed from an orxgmal pre- 
served in the monastery of St. Antony in Egypt, in the Coptic year 1500. 

_fcli w x * fcJ J» * ^ J^ 1 r^ * ^ ^ ^ «*-" ^° ■***' "* ^ r " , 



MINGANA COLLECTION 81 

B 

Ff. 1835-2086 : A treatise containing Questions and Answers between St. Athanasius, 
Patriarch of Alexandria, and a pagan nobleman called Antiochus. 1 

These Questions and Answers are forty-five in number, and bear on different theological 
questions. 

Begins : J^ Jl ^j^Ufl lit Jl r =>Jl Uic ^ ^^ * JU ^.j jUI Jl jUJI dli ^ 

Ends : JU 4! j^JIj I^j^Ij J.LJI d* .^Jl Jl lyli-ij cdli J <iU^ 4)1 Jl JUI l/>j 

C 

Ff. 2086-2166 : Twelve chapters by Gregory Thaumaturgus against heretics. 
~ r >\ J d\ **■) j-S^LrfN J^ Ijjj V^ v-^ 1 d^ &sJ&J^ V ^J ^ ^uJ y* UrVi *A* 

The chapters bear on the mystery of the Incarnation, and resemble in their form the 
" Anathemas " of Cyril of Alexandria. Each " anathema " is followed by a Commentary (J»». 

Begins : jO» . . . p)UI ^ 4^1 j*^ o^ fj\ Jyt 0* 

Ends : jJlj tjyb\ *_J^- -ul «ju->- ^lil J. 

Dated (fol. 216a) Thursday of the second week of Lent of the year 1590 of the Martyrs (a.d. 
1874), and written by the priest Shenudah, 2 of the monastery of the Abbot Paula (Paul), for the 
deacon Rizk George al-Khashshab. 

Vy. Ul jUI JJ1 ^Jill j* f *U- jj p-Vl **f* j^-JI <?< * J* j»UJI v^ 1 !■*» f 1 * O&J 
~fJlj . . . jUJ»yi ^J^iJJ (^-"J iL-i-j uJI &- j-JJuJI rr a)l j* old I *mJ r \ <y Lr J-l fji *iUi ^ . . . 

Clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

Numbers of leaves in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 24.] 

57. 

241 x 155 mm. 52 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

A work of dogmatic theology on the Trinity and the Incarnation, by the West Syrian Arab 
writer Daniel b. Hattab, who was born in a.d. 1327 and died shortly after A.D. 1383. 

Title : jt*y& v^ '^ u 1 -^ 4*^ V^ 

BOOK OF THE PRINCIPLES OF FAITH, AND OF THE HEALING OF THE 

HEARTS OF THE BELIEVERS 3 

1 Cf . Pat. Gr., vol. xxviii., pp. 597-708. 

8 An inscription on the margins by a later hand states that he became later Bishop of Asyut, under the name of Michael. 
3 This work is not mentioned in Cheikho's Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes ChrMens (pp. 7 and 230), where 
the author is also erroneously called Khattab for Hattab. 

6 



82 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

The work is partly controversial, and refutes the East Syrian writer Elijah, Bishop of 
Nisibin (fol. 3«) : , , .. n i - 

*■ - - iC ,Ui U^/l aU W* 31 V 1 *"^ <i° J J* ^ "^ 

The work is divided into 3 numhajs, subdivided into fasts] of whieh an index is found on fol. 
52, with the omission of the title of the first manhaj. 

The first fad of the first manhaj begins (fol. 3) : JU *A» *r* ^ W «* W J ^ ^ 
The first fasl of the second «**« begins (fol. ip) : J2»WVl Je J*" ^ *- <j ^ Vl J-* 
The first /«J (not named) of the third manhaj begins (fol. 25a): J* oM U5I J cJUl ^ 

.♦J. ;j^jj c;— J' J ^- Jl f^ 51 •■ i *~ } 
On fol 2« is a biography of the author, written in A.D. 1931 by the present Syrian Partiarch 
of AnSoS; Ignati^ E^ern I., before his election to the Patriarchate, and while he was still 
Archbishop of Syria and Lebanon. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

The Patriarch brings out fully the inhuman sufferings inflicted on the author by the 
Musni gov^n" of Hardin for his Writing this book in which there is a controversxal chapter 

""S2 JS5 Wy. *& and written by order of the Patriarch, in Zahlah, by the priest 

, ^3tfSffi r i , a « of Sadad in Syria, and was collated with another 
coov found in the monastery of Za'faran. The latter is dated a.d. 1825, and is in the hand- 
writing" Spriest Stephen^! Jazlrah, who became Bishop of Horns under the name of Iwanms 
(John), went to India, returned and died in Jazlrah in a.d. 1869. 
. jU-Ul JU.\ 3I JLiU ^U JbVl «ji^ iUJI o*> ««M Ic j-r- 11 viB .b*j ^Jl Jj-« y« -H* 

jriLivi i)^>Ji j^vi fi^i Www jU „v r v ,1, ow ju3 ^ \w «- J bl ^^ «" <j * £!>"' 
Cm a- ':jJ* &> *» jU * ^' J* 1 "c" oJ*> r L - ** * Us - 1 jU <^ ^ ^ u ? ** 

Clear and very readable Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab, ioo.] 

58. 

2Q2 x 205 mm. 163 leaves of two columns. Twenty-six lines to the column. 
The sermons of Athanasius IV, the Greek Patriarch of Jerusalem, in a.d. 1452-68. 

.ji^jjl £jja>, cfjr*^ £*\y v^ 



MINGANA COLLECTION 83 

The sermons follow the ecclesiastical calendar. A few leaves are missing at the beginning, 
which contained the title and the first three sermons. The name of the author is found at the 
beginning of every sermon, the first of which begins : J J-^-1 U-V &* .£-«*H a. Jbl a*- VI 

M yj! fijL .^j>\ iljjjW. j^M ot-.^ 

The last sermon begins (fol. 1606) : *-A" J Jtir ^jjl djjj* jr^Ufl ^-o^l ILI Jy <y &* 

No date. Written in a clear and well-spaced Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1550. Headings 
in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

Ff. 1-6 and fol. 163 have been added by a later hand and dated (fol. 1636) Friday, 15th of 
January of the year 7114 from the creation of Adam, said to correspond with a.d. 1766. 1 They 
were written by the priest 'Isa Khuri, son of Mansur, from Nazareth : 

^j, ^ 411 ^U >l ju . . . jc-j fc-j iL^-j kJII ^Vl J-u>di jil^JI jol ILV y* <»jlj i>j «JV! 

The supplied leaves are in a clear but not spaced Syrian Naskhi. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 81.] 



59. 

162 X no mm. 86 leaves. Generally from fifteen to nineteen lines to the page. 

A 

Fol. la : A short historical account of the life of the Virgin. 

.JUI J cJ^^ 5i- S3 •-»— Jl Ifc- »U- Jr 1 0* J^ r 411 Or. l-w 

B 

Ff. ifl-76 : The explanation of some ecclesiastical fasts. 
The subscription is : [4^3 oULJI yl ^ ^M^ll ^" 

The following Fathers are quoted : 

(1) Nicephorus, Patriarch of Constantinople (ff. 1&-20). 

(2) Michael, Patriarch of Constantinople (fol. 3a). 

(3) St. Saba (fol. ya). 

C 

Ff . 8a~4ib : Questions and Answers concerning the Dominical Festivals, translated from Greek 
into Arabic : <^Ji U)l J! Ujjl fclli ^ UU^^I ijuJI aUVI Jr 1 c^ W^.yHj lj ? A •/** <^— 

1 These two eras do not correspond. The writing of the MS. is more in harmony with a.d. 1766 than with a.m. 71 14 in 
which there is possibly an error of the copyist. 



8 4 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

These Dominical Festivals are enumerated in the fc)lo««^r : 

(x) Ff. 80-11?. : The Annunciation. Six questions and answers. ^ ^ ^ _^ ^ 

(2) Ff. II&-I7* •• The Nativity. Ten questions and answers. , 

M Ff. 170-246 : The Epiphany. Ten questions and answers. ,.,..-,- 

(4) Ff.24*-3i6: The Transfiguration. Fifteen questions and answers 

On fol. 316 is a quotation from Andrew of Crete. 

(5) Ff. 3X6-4X6: Easter. Seven questions and answer^ ( ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

B. 4x6-606 : Various historical. Biblical and J^SfiXS ^ Cathoiic 

The first question deals with the secession of the G™"jJ^ ^ h it ta A . D . 1438, at 

Church) from the main body of the Catholic Church, and with its union wit 

the time of the Council of Florence. „ ^ >( 

Begins: 5L. j ^ -UlU U*l ^ «,*« U ^ j £/* ^ ^ Crf s> •.' . £ 

The last question (fol. 586) deals with some strange happenings in the ancient province of 

Rumely - juji a 4 #ui ci y vi >, j. x-. U ^ <y jf- 



E 



Ff. 606-636: Miscellaneous questions and answers. Testaments. 

On ff. 6o«-6r« is a list of all the canonical ^"V^epL^ immediately after the 
The two Epistles of Clement are counted as canonical and are placed immeo y 

Apocalypse. 

Ff . 636-656 : A selection of questions and answers, by Basil of Caesarea and his brother 
Gregory Nyssen. ^ ^.^ ^^ ^ ^ j._ U ^ 

G 
Ff 656-85* : A collection of thirty pious stories, illustrating some points of spirituality. ^ 
The first story, which comes from Italy, illustrates cruelty, and begins : J** U»J W f 

.(sic) JUI jU- ■oT I* o^JI f-wj ^ l ~ a ' 
The last story deals with a woman who outwardly was fasting and praying, but inwardly 
was affected with pride and self-esteem. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 85 

H 

Ff 8$a-86a : A short treatise in poetry (added by a later hand) in which a Christian 
endeavours to illustrate the mystery of the Trinity to a Muhammadan. 

Begins : . jCJI J.juJI li t (»c) ^ * 

No date Written by two hands in a clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 
1780. Headings in red. On a fly-leaf pasted on the board of the book occurs the name of an 
owner, Rizk. [Mingana Chr. Arab. 866.] 



60. 

223 x160 mm. 241 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

A historico-theological encylopaedia by the Patriarch Macanus b. Za Im from Aleppo, who 

died in a.d. 1672. 

Title (fol. 66) : ^ iH ^ 

THE BOOK OF THE BEE 

The first part of the introduction is missing at the beginning, and a leaf is wanting at the 
end which contained the final words of the book. A _w 

The author states in his introduction that he closely followed in the first part of his Arabic 
work the Book of the Signs (j y J\ J&) which Baisius Sakizi, bishop of Gaza, who died m Russia 

in a.d. 1678, had written in Greek. . , 

On fol. 10a, after giving a list of 40 chapters, the contents of which are on ff. 6*io«, the 
author states that of the above Signs only 28 were written by Baisius Sakizi. 

^ ^\ ^ <iu. ,1 c u*i 3' t-b J Tjo toys ^ ^ u * w •*' ■>/*•" VJ 1 v 1 ^ 

This statement is repeated on the back of the page. 

The word ^jSUt is also written with a Sf» as ^jiUI 

The headings " Signs " proceed from fol. 106 to fol 976, where the last Sign is called the 42nd. 

.uLUl ;U>. wl* Jr» ,y 0i*M 4^ > V1 ^ Vj" 
The contents, therefore, of the book do not correspond with the above index, and the 
imitation by the author of Sakizi's work ends on fol. 1020. 

The first Sign (called the 14th in the MS.) begins (fol. 106) : 

oUjJIj j r J\ tti- J cA JH s* »jto *— ^ ^ -^ U & ^ '^ ^ VJI 
and the last, or the 43rd, begins (fol. 976) : 

ji ^ ;ju j-j o-y^ *.' ^ ^ ^ &* Wj V^ *i e* ^^ auJ1 ^ ° l - ^ 



86 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

From fol. 1020-fol. 123& the following headings occur in the MS. :— 

(1) Ff . i02a-io6& : A short discourse on the Rod of Moses. 

•^y A^ 1 J*".* ^°>^ $ ^ 3 ufy "^ ^ & J^ 3 f 

(2) Ff. 1066-1116 : An explanation of some points dealing with the Book of Psalms. 

.jj\yA\ J^ J s*& XL-?* 

(3) Ff. Ii2#-ii6a : A short discourse on the Apostles and Apostolic Canons. 

(4) Ff. 116^-1236 : Miscellaneous short treatises on the following points : — 

(a) The thirty pieces of silver for which Judas sold our Lord. 

(b) On a sick man who confessed and died. 

(c) Different questions and answers on the interment of a dead person. 

(d) A miracle performed by a bishop in Cyprus, contemporary with the author. 

(e) The nature of the murder committed by Cain. 
(/) Questions dealing with Moses and Pharaoh. 

Longer treatises are found on ff. 124^-2416, as follows : — 

(1) Ff . I24a-I4ifl : A commentary on the Christian Profession of Faith, by Simon the 
Metropolitan of Thessalonika or Salonika. 

.<5Lij!Ur WU ijJj jL~- <-r - L -xSJLl I^Ll ^3 »Vl tfj _^-*" 

(2) Ff. 141&-147& : Various historical questions dealing with the birth of Christ, with the 
language in which God spoke to Adam and which was shown by a miracle to have been Syriac, 
and with the eight " Books of Mysteries " which St. Peter handed over to his disciple Clement. 

The heading of the last point is as follows : 

Xmjj U ^kLJSl .Jul? Jl J^-Jl j*>. b*> cf 11 ^^ ^ V Ul ^ CS J*'"* £j* 

(3) Ff. 1480-1506 : The history of the patriarchate of Jerusalem. 

(4) Ff. 1510-153& : A historical discourse concerning Photius, bishop of Tyre, and 
Eustathius, bishop of Berytus (Beyrout). 

(5) Ff. 1536-156^ : A historical discourse concerning Dioscorus of Alexandria. 

\y\ »yj>-\ liUj *Sj^3) CSj* tf} JfryW i/JJ^ Cf i$*Jr? Jf~ 

(6) Ff. 1566-160*: What happened between Athanasius, bishop of Perrha on the 
Euphrates, and Sabinianus his successor, in the 5th century. 

(7) Ff. i6oa-i67& : Some historical points dealing with the 3rd Council, with Nestorius, 
and with Ibas, bishop of Edessa. 

.\j£-\ >_A" ^iSj <. »yj» ^*j \*>}j&\ CPJ 



MINGANA COLLECTION 87 

(8) Fol. 167& : How the author, while still bishop of Aleppo, collected the Acts of St. Simeon 
the Stylite. 

.^.smvJI jU*-~" y>- \y»2- v_*S jJ>- 

(9) Ff. 1680-1706 : What Scripture teaches about the Antichrist. 

.j£>_5 ..-a. jl v>y f* l»j <iU_j JU-JI *t~-JI ^ 4JJI ^S tf _^_ ^ 

(10) Ff. 1710-173& : The prophecies of the seven Greek pagan philosophers about Christ : 
His birth of a virgin, and His divine Economy. 

<JUj oj.Xi (sic) oi-Ji 0* ^33 c— 11 -H 5 J ^V ^ f V J* ¥ ol ^-> jUI eI * 

.JU1 <-J^j 

(n) Ff. 1740-1770 : On the number and duration of the Christian fasts, which cover 163 
days of the year. 

Headed: \y~ 3 ^JJI j^l; J-Jl j r * J^ J1 a* W J 1 ^ 1 W^ V^^ 11 Ul *—- "" 

(12) Ff. 177&-181& : On the names of all the bishoprics, ancient and modern, under the 
jurisdiction of the patriarchate of Constantinople. The bishoprics number 81, and the arch- 
bishoprics 49. 

U>JI dUr pJ J> ^J . jyUj ^3 f-^3 ^UkJi!! U.j.1 J &j&\ 3jM ^J" cf u • • • 

(13) Ff. 1820,-1850, : Explanation of various liturgical questions. 

t U lS JM\ ^jjtfl jb, JU jl ^ V ^ aLJI f U J" ^ uiy" 

(14) Ff. 1850-1866 : How the relics of the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste were found. 

.jj»b jmmjVI Ucl .^-j jc t5-JJ?" -»f" 

(15) Ff. i86b-i88b : Various questions from the ecclesiastical history of Theodoret. 

(16) Ff. 1886-1910 : A short history of Nestorius, followed by some anecdotes of miscel- 
laneous characters. 

(17) Ff. 1910-1930 : An account of the body of Constantine the Great and its burial. 

Ff. 1916 and 1920, which should have contained the Greek characters of an inscription 
dealing with Constantine, are left blank. 

(18) Ff . 1936-1970 : A short history of the Islamic dynasties. 

.^12, j£ **J! j jj ptropj ^y-j f 3i-vi uu. ^u ^1 ijiJi i± v cr* -^ o* 



88 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 

do) Ff wa-iaga : The history of the Byzantine emperors from the time of Constantine 
the Great to that of Constantine Palaiologus, under whose reign Byzantium was conquered m 
1453 by the Turkish Sultan Muhammad the Conqueror. 

(20) A historical sketch containing the number of the years that elapsed from Adam to the 
coming of Christ. . . 

(21) Ff. 2030-204* : The explanation of the title " Judge of the Patriarchs » formerly 
given to the patriarch of Alexandria. 

(22) Ff . 2040-2060 : Various historical notes dealing with the emperors of Rome, and some 

astronomical points. . , ., , , 

(2S) Ff 2066-2195 : A short history of the 12 ascetic saints : John, Isichius, David Joseph, 
Antony, Theodosius, Theodosi, Elijah, Poemen, Nathan and Aphicus/ who left their cells in the 
mountain near Antioch, on the advice of Ephremius, patriarch of Antioch (527-545), m order 
to repair to the country of the Georgians, where, after performing many miracles, they died. 

^ y \ ij& JU ^ l^j tflLii c jU- _~)i Ji-I ^ l/J ^ c^ ^ <W U\> ^jbVUj 

.JU* o^. pjoUlj w-UJ! ^.U U** <>£ *--*U' f»*^J o^ 1 * 

(24) Ff . 2196-2256 : A short history of the seven Ecumenic Councils. 

AijLJl i-jjull jl$3l ^lf IUI ^ hJr -^ fli * 

(25) Ff . 2256-2290 : A historical treatise on how the " Sign of the Cross " was performed. 

(26) Ff . 2290-2410 : Miscellaneous historical and theological treatises and questions and 
answers, with no special headings. 

(27) Fol. 2410 : A short account of John Chrysostom. 

Incomplete at the end. 

Dated (fol. 1770) end of the month of August, a.d. 1771, and written by a scribe called 
Thomas Sadakah. 
\VV\ <>—.? ^i <-_L— .? will J iJ j4^ V* (^ J-^" •*»•*** ^y V J' j^' j^ #J 5 a2Ap 

1 There are only eleven names, instead of twelve as the text implies. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 89 

Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Fairly broad margins. 

An inscription by an owner David, son of Michael 'Akil (J5U JiUwi <j» aj\&), with the date 

beginning of January, i860," is found inside the cover. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 104.] 



61. 

303 x 210 mm. 590 leaves. Twenty-three lines to the page. 

The sermons of the Greek Orthodox deacon Macarius, the headmaster of the school of Patmos, 
who died in a.d. 1737, translated in a.d. 1780 from Greek into Arabic by the priest-monk 
Athanasius, son of Michael Mukhalla'. 

Title : 

THE EVANGELICAL TRUMPET 

Headed: ojjJ! ^ ^JIS^jJI tfyjS* ^i" ^Ldl . . . * Ji*jj 411 If jM\ J^JI J& • • • 

,J-*V1 tS 5^»jJI j-^Url ^jy-l ^4>-^J! jUJl j 

Begins: 1 J^VI ^yii-jJI «A£ JJUm j»I u>IJi u^UM ^j^l . . . jjJ-l aJI Jjii -W LI . . . 

. . . oL53l l-i* Jc vi^»y . . . <U.UW...flil <£LiJl iijJl Ia»^ c.i5^U ^1 jLdl.j ii^Jl ^jlLJIj jUeillj 

plyll j£j . . . jj*Jm »jj>- J oli^JI <-jjJI Ju* tfyjfc* jtT < f\+j£\ ^i)l *iJjJIj fj^-j*" • • • J' *-»j~**M 

will aju- j_^ ^ J_jVi jy^^ >-^l J «M <^ Je <ctUij L #J J1 &II Jl Uli^JI Aiill ^> c*j j» 

,<.9%~~» J\JU»*_5 Ai_u»^-'_5 

Ff. 6a-gb contain an introduction to the work by Abramius (Ephrem), the patriarch of 
Jerusalem and of all Palestine. 

Ff. loa-ijb contain two introductions by the same patriarch Ephrem, while he was still a 
teacher of Greek in Cyprus. 

The second introduction contains the history of the author, the deacon Macarius. 

The first of these introductions is headed : ^JIOjJI Jj>\ J? kzS'V <il)j) . . . ,J<&\ *j3b ljy~ 

Ff . 176-460; contain a long introduction by the author himself, in which he sets forth his aim 
in writing his book, and informs us how it was burned by the Roman Catholic authorities when 
first published in Greek in Venice. It was later published in Leipzig. 



1 The first words of the first line of the introduction have disappeared, owing to the top part of the page having been 
torn away. 



g0 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 

Aj Ji ^ 1- 1^ a jUVI jJUl Arid o- ^ U» ^ J8W. - W. * v tfll tf>l J** 

Thprp are ^ sermons, a list of which is found on ff. 466-4 86 - , . _ , 

W oTthe ™n 8 ; especiaUy those at the beginning, have a tone hostue to the Roman 

Catholic Church. 

The sermons bear on the following subjects : 
i) 5T* i : Against pride. (For the Sunday of the Pharisee and the Publican.) 

2 Page 24 : Exhortation to penitence. (For the Sunday of the Prodigal Son. 

3 Pale 41 : The Last Judgment. (For the Sunday of the Deprivation of Flesh.) 
U\ Pile 6* • On sin (For the Sunday of the Deprivation of Cheese.) 

l!) Jage 8 5 7 ': On "he fact that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father alone. (For the 

^ iTSe^ A^t the supremacy of the Pope, and on the fact that Christ alone is the 
head of the Church. (For the first Sunday in Lent ) 

( 7 ) Page 129 : ' On the true Church/ against the supremacy of the Pope. (For the second 

W (8) ££*8 : Another sermon on the fact that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father 

alone. (For the second Sunday in Lent.) rwrfi «f Christ (For 

( 9 ) Page 189 : On the fact that the Eastern Church is the true Church of Christ. (*or 

the third Sunday in Lent.) CnT1 , , r • T pn f \ 

(10) Page 213 : Against the existence of Purgatory. (For the fourth Sunday in Lent ) 

(11) Page 233 : On the fact that the saints will only obtain full happiness on the day of the 
Resurrection. (For the fifth Sunday in Lent.) 

(12) Page 255 : Another sermon against the supremacy of the Pope, and on the harm that 
the doctrine of this supremacy entails. (For the fifth Sunday in Lent.) 

(13) Page 284 : On the trials of this world, and on the utility of remembering death. (*or 

the Resurrection of Lazarus.) 

(14) Page 305 : On the gift of the Holy Eucharist. (For Palm Sunday.) 
(i<\ Page 32^ : On the preparation for the Holy Communion. 

(16) Pa|e 345 : On the greatness of the Eucharist, and on the true words of consecration. 

(For Maundy Thursday.) 

(17) Page 378 : On the love of God towards man. (For the Washing of Feet.) 

(18) Page 394 : On the Passion of our Lord. (For Good Friday.) 
(iq) Page 419 : On the intensity of the Passion of our Lord. 

(20) Page 442 : On the joy at the Resurrection of our Lord. (For Easter Sunday.) 
21 Page 455 : On the greatness of the Virgin. (For the festival of the Annmiciation.) 
(22) Page 473 : On the fact that the wounds of our Lord are the source of our salvation. 
(For the New Sunday, known as the Sunday of St. Thomas.) 

» The references here are to the pages of the MS., which begin on fol. 4Q&. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 91 

(23) Page 492 : On the fact that women are more interested in good works than men. (For 
the Sunday of the Women carrying Sweet Spices.) 

(24) Page 511 : On the avoidance of sin. (For the Sunday of the Paralytic.) 

(25) Page 530 : Exhortation to the love of God. (For the Sunday of the Samaritan 
Woman.) 

(26) Page 550 : Exhortation to the possession of the spiritual blindness. (For the Sunday 
of the Blind Man.) 

(27) Page 571 : On the joy experienced by the saints from their meditation on the Ascen- 
sion. (For the festival of the Ascension.) 

(28) Page 592 : On the fact that the Spirit who descended on the Apostles was not the 
person of the Holy Spirit, but the grace common to the three Persons of the Trinity. (For 
Whit Sunday.) 

(29) Page 612 : On the great benefits that accrue to us from the saints. (For the first 
Sunday.) 

(30) Page 633 : On the fact that the " Fasting of the Apostles " is an ancient institution. 
(For the second Sunday.) 

(31) Page 651 : On the greatness of the sin of gluttony. (For the fourth Sunday.) 

(32) Page 677 : On the reproof of parents who do not correct their children, and on the 
reproof of wicked women. (For the tenth Sunday.). 

(33) Page 695 : Arguments against Purgatory. (For the fifth Sunday.) 

(34) Page 718 : Against magicians. (For the seventh Sunday.) 

(35) Page 739 : On the greatness of priesthood. (For the twelfth Sunday.) 

(36) Page 758 : On the fact that the Christians of these days are martyrs in intention, 
and on the fact that tribulations are for them the path to heaven. (For the fourteenth 
Sunday.) 

(37) Page 775 : On the fact that the light that shone in the Transfiguration was divine and 
uncreated. (For the festival of the Transfiguration.) 

(38) Page 794 : On the Assumption. (For the commemoration of the death of the Mother 
of God.) 

(39) Page 810 : On the greatness of John the Baptist. (For the commemoration of the 
Decollation of John the Baptist.) 

(40) Page 830 : On the greatness of St. John the Evangelist. (For the commemoration 
of St. John the Evangelist.) 

(41) Page 847 : On the fact that the Virgin obtained the perfection of grace more than all 
the angels and the saints. (For the commemoration of the Purification of the Virgin.) 

(42) Page 862 : On the greatness of St. Catherine. (For the commemoration of St. 
Catherine.) 

(43) Page 891 : On the greatness of St. Nicholas. (For the commemoration of St. Nicholas.) 

(44) Page 908 : On the Nativity. (For the festival of the Nativity.) 

(45) Page 927 : On the great gifts vouchsafed unto us by the baptism of our Lord. (For 
the festival of the Epiphany.) 

(46) Page 942 : On the greatness of St. Antony the Great. (For the commemoration of 
St. Antony.) 



92 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

(47) Page 961 : The enumeration of the various innovations of the Latin Church. (For 
the feast of the three principal saints of the Greek Church.) 

(48) Page 989 : For the feast of St. Pachomius. 

(49) Page 1006 : Against Sodomy. 

(50) Page 1026 : Praise of SS. Joachim and Hannah. 

(51) Page 1046 : On the dead. 

(52) Page 1064 : Another sermon on the dead. 

(53) Pa S e I0 73 *• For tlie Nativit y of tne Virgin. 

On fol. 5896 the copyist states that this last sermon is not by the author, but by the man who 

wrote the introduction to the book. 

Dated (fol. 590) 5th of March of the year a.d. 1821, and written by Michael, son of Knanl 

Allah-Wairdi (= Deodatus) from Damascus. 

.La A* l5 -5 > ^yjVi 

A long inscription on fol. 590a by Hibat-Allah Sadakah, dated beginning of October, a.d. 
1823, informs us that the translator of the work, Athanasius Mukhalla', was later ordained bishop 
of Beyrout ; and states that he, Sadakah, wishing to have a copy of this MS. for the church of 
Horns, wrote to Papa (Priest) Gabriel, a monk from Mount Sinai, then in Damascus, to have a 
careful copy of it made in Mount Sinai. 

Clear and bold Syrian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters and sub-headings m red. 

Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 115.] 



62. 

169 x 218 mm. 168 leaves. Twenty-three lines to the page. 

A theological work on the fact that the change in the Eucharistic elements takes place 
at the words of the Epiclesis, and not at those of the Institution, by the Greek Orthodox writer, 
Elias b. Fakhr Tarabulusi (i.e. of Tripoli), who died at Aleppo about a.d. 1740. 1 

Title : 

THE HIGH CONTROVERSY UPON THE INVOCATION OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 

jiyj ^.IJJI >*» cf> > ^ > UI J r !l ^ V^ 1 V^ l *^ 4 ^ : -^ UJI ^ 

The author states in his introduction (fol. 16) that he drew extensively on the work of 
Sebastus of Trebizonde, and that he wrote his present book against the conclusions of an adversary 



1 Cheikho {Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chretiens, p. 40, No 5) apparently knew of the existence of 
such a work, but was not aware of its title. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 93 

called 'Abdallah b. Zakhir, who had written a treatise entitled : " A controversial treatise on the 
words of the Institution." 1 

Begins : jJill j»-UI jJ! J^ J-» U . . . jUVI 5Ui-l vJj" <>1> ^ U ^" C5 111 ^ - uj " 1 
li^ ,UI # jvcj^l ^531 ^ ^U U 4il y» ^.'J-Ji >fl j»>. ^ >» J: o-U1 ^ J*WI <J 
^jlS y t j Oil ^JJI J3J.WI >e^3» cT>-b^ ^f ***M (JUI v 1 ^ 0* &a J ^J-l 6* . . . 4-^ 

The work is divided into a mukaddamah, 8 /«s/s and a khdtimah. The first /«sZ (fol 9a) is : 

The eighth /^s/ (fol. 1306) is: ^Jl w*J1 ^^ •-^ l ^ 11 *-^ cs* ^ «^ t J o*^ ^ ! 

The khdtimah (fol. 1620) begins : j^a^JI .alxiVI -fclC _$-. Jc jv^yjVI j^-JI *Jr <*U-1 

Dated (fol. i68«) 27th January, a.d. 1745, and written in Tarabulus (Tripoli) by the priest 

Nicholas Ra'd, son of George : ^J\ *U jttl jyfc" ^ ^ jLr-Nj C- Ul C-^ 1 tf *** tl^ 51 °^ 

j, I ^jy- ^l acj Vyi ^"(T j,_ ^ \vto l**-** <*- i-o^Jl <j->.l> «o* <j «>.jb *-*■ «.U~o 

On the fly-leaf at the end of the volume is an inscription which states that the book passed 
into the possession of Jabbur, son of the above priest Nicholas. Another notes states that after 
him the MS. belonged to a Michael Sabbagh. 

Clear, uniform Syrian Naskhi hand. Chapter headings in thick black characters, and 
sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins, on which are Biblical references. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 95.] 

63. 

220 x 156 mm. 16 leaves. Fourteen lines to the page. 
An anonymous collection of religious khutbahs (discourses). 

JLtl yfcf 

The khutbahs are four in number, and are written in a flowery style, in rhymed prose. At the 
end of each khutbah a prayer is offered for the Patriarch of the day. 

Fol. xa : The second Sunday in Lent : ^JJI 4) **J\ -cr^l ^ <y J W1 ^' ^>" V*^ 

.IQJ.1 JU U* Jljl 

Fol. Sa: The third Sunday in Lent. Begins: ■jjUl jUI lSi-\ jy» jUI ^JJI 4J u«Jl 

Fol. 86 : The fourth Sunday in Lent. Begins : ^ sh\ J^ 1 *^ J 1 ( ?U H cs^ 1 ^ ■^ 
Fol. 12a : The fifth Sunday in Lent, to be read at the nth hour of the Tuesday of Holy 
Week : J34JI >J^\ $ J^i-l .*~JI ii#? f j.. »J^ V^ ^Ul tf>"J • • • 

*l»J\ oU$3l jc <JJ-I 03UJI 



94 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

From indications at the end of every discourse, it appears that these khutbahs were read 

immediately before the Gospel for the day. 

No date. Written in a clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1830. Headings in 

black. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab, no.] 



64. 

323 x 219 mm. 337 leaves. Twenty-three lines to the page. 

The Lenten and other sermons composed by Elijah Munyati, from the island of Cephalonia, 
bishop of Kalavryta in Greece, who nourished in the first half of the eighteenth century. 

They were translated from modern Greek into Arabic in a.d. 1765 by the teacher Theodosius, 
with the help of Macarius Sadakah, bishop of Tyre and Sidon. All this is explained in the fol- 
lowing inscription on the title-page : 

\+iL* js f~^>^ O* (j 3 ^ \*jf iSj^ oVtu <b- «* ly£ o_^-» 6j>-\ *\^3 j^\ fV 8 ^ °^ ^ 

JLr 45 •*> Jjji-1 *Jy **. J ^jW* J^f J* UU L tSj J-U-l UJliif Ijjf j* JU U1 J 

oi>ji juJi jy\ j. ;a*Lo o-ui i*j&\ urn ji V-> ljJI v^ 1 Uil cy b .-^ ^j*" ■*•> W -^j <-* y^ 

Js>-V »jj ^1 jj-^llC^jJl o-^^ajl- ^l^a-^ ^ jc o^J* Jiji-I Ia^j j^ jlja* a»x* i/jj^lk J? £jf 
iL*^j , oil i-=»=^> \W <*-■ ^r-» • • • yjJl y» j\~-£s/jVI ju^e^-Jl U~A>- Ul ^ ^ ^U«», <y <_P ***** 

A 

Ff. 36-2096 : 21 sermons ('izah) divided into four series (daur). 
The first series comprises 8 sermons, on the following subjects : 

(1) On predestination (fol. 36). 

(2) On envy (fol. 136). 

(3) On the coming judgment (fol. 226). 

(4) On the torment of hell (fol. 34a). 

(5) On penitence (fol. 48a). 

(6) On the Eucharist (fol. 626). 

(7) On Good Friday (fol. 69a). 

(8) On the Resurrection (fol. 86a). 

The second series comprises 7 sermons, on the following subjects : 

(1) On the Creed (fol. 886). 

(2) On sin and penitence (fol. 102a). 

(3) On the soul (fol. iiia). 

(4) On confession (fol. 1200). 

(5) On the things to be asked in prayer (fol. 1316). 

(6) For Palm Sunday (fol. 1410). 

(7) Another sermon on Good Friday (fol. 1456). 



MINGANA COLLECTION 95 

The third series comprises 5 sermons, on the following subjects : 

(1) On death (fol. 161&). 

(2) Another sermon on confession (fol. 1706). 

(3) On conscience and on the coming judgment (fol. 179a). 

(4) Another sermon on confession (fol. iSSa). 

(5) On heaven (fol. 1916). 

The fourth series comprises 1 sermon, on faith and on the Creed (fol. 1996). 
A good index of all the sermons is found on ff. ib-2b. 

B 

Ff. 211&-337& : The 21 makalahs which form the second part of the book. 
The makalahs are not divided into series (daw). They must have formed a separate book 
by the author and been added to the present MS. for the sake of completeness. 
An index of the makalahs is found on ff . 2106-211^. 
The first two sermons and the last two makalahs begin as follows : 

Fol. 36 : \jfs **\ >uf •** V . . . g>1 £>- *W Jdi J3 .^31 f^ 1 Cf J ^ V1 ^ V1 tj ^ 
Fol. 136: j*^\ cOJcJJi . . . L^b~ <j53I j. f y 4U» jS> -lT^ r ^> <y 4^ ^ 
Fol. 330& : lu- r . . . jpJIIT ;jipU! .a* ^» 0* • J A' A 4 (O* aSVI :jJIj ^ 4 <^> ! ^ 

•Jr. fr 
Fol. 3346 : jUu- dU1 ^ jl . . . c~*^ ^ u>« .aJVI ;JIj Jy-> ^ tf>l <1^ 

The final leaf of the MS., containing the last few lines of the text, is missing, but the text 
itself is. complete, as. the missing words have been added by a later hand on the broad margin 
of fol. 3376. 

No date. Written in a clear and bold Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1810. Main headings 
in thick black characters and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

On fol. 3376 are four impressions of the seal of Stephen Hakim, dated 1881. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 114.] 



65. 

305 x 197 mm. 251 leaves. Twenty-five lines to the page. 

An extensive work on the duties of priesthood, by the Jesuit Louis Dupont, who died in 1624, 
as translated in Aleppo, in 1730, by another Jesuit, Pierre Fromage, who died in 1740. 

Title : oy^l oUlj ^ oyUI •*>> 

Begins : ^j u">. o*UI U^JI *Uji Jl-j V U ^ !l ^ ^ J -^* *** ' ' ' ^ ^ ^ 

The book is divided into seven makalahs, subdivided into chapters, of which an index is 
found on ff. 2b-6b. 



9 6 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

No date. Written in a clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi, of about a.d. 1740. 1 Headings 
in red but main titles in thick black characters. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. 

On fol. ia are two inscriptions by owners, one of whom was Michael Joseph Bassal, who 
bought the MS. on Friday, the 4 th February, 1855. The other inscription is by an earlier owner, 
Gabriel, son of Antanios (Antony) Babchi (^l Xf jrj-flUil ^-^ <>J J^LtfO 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 16b.] 



66. 

282 x 191 mm. 311 pages. Twenty-three lines to the page. 

The theologico-mystical work, entitled JApi* by Joseph II, the Patriarch of the Chaldeans 
(East Syrian Uniats), who died in 1714. 

The word " Magnet," ^J*^ , is not found as a title at the beginning, but it is found in 

the colophon. At the beginning the work is entitled : 

The book was translated by Joseph II himself, from Arabic into Syriac, and three copies 
of it are found in my collection of Syriac MSS. 2 

Begins : l5 ~ r J +/* ^ *~"> ' ' ' ^ ^ U * ^ ^ Wj ^ '?^ ^ 



►i-u»i 



The work is divided into two parts (kisms), the first of which is divided into eight and the 
second into twenty-six chapters. 

Dated (p. 309) 2026 of the Greeks (a.d. 1715), and written by the deacon John (Hanna), 

son of the deacon Isho' : jSiA jM * J* j^^ ^J "*"> #" "*" cr^ 11 ^ ^ ■#* f" 

At beginning and end are inscriptions by Antun Niiri Habash (^ ^jy djWl)* who 
bought the MS. in 1863. After him the MS. passed into the possession of his son, Na'iim Niiri, 
who has written his name badly in a French inscription on page 310, as Naoum Nounr (I) . Some 
time after, the MS. was bought by Fath-Allah Niiri, the brother of Na'iim Nun. 

A cle'ar and good Mesopotamian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters, and 
sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. On the fly-leaf at the beginning is 

the figure of a deer. , , 

5 [Mmgana Chr. Arab. 49.] 

* The volume is written in the same hand as that of No. 104 [18], which is dated a.d. 1739. 
2 Catalogue of the Mingana Collection, vol. i., pp. 900-901, and 905-907- 



MINGANA COLLECTION 97 

67. 

319 x 220 mm. 155 leaves. Generally twenty-six and twenty-seven lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 2&-1440 : A work on Sin and Penitence, translated by the Capucin Father, Joseph de 
Reuilly. The title of the work is : *LJI Jy 

THE TRUMPET OF HEAVEN 

Begins : v lk^ J** jT ^li-l J&\ |j* ^ JU j* LI . . . oU^ll ^JJI M \^\ jj^ 
On fol. 2a we are informed that de Reuilly translated the work in Cairo in a.d. 1717. 
ui>^ •y-VI <Uj ^ J^j ^ ^Li^JI U^ y _ *j*U\ y** Ai-u j v l33l life ^\J^>\ ^1 JJJ 

.^-Jl -u^J ^ilVlj iL-^j ;^ic ^ <L. £,jl- ^ . . . j^-_y.l$3l ^--v jU < > r JiJl 

B 

Ff. i446-i55« : A series of sermons on the Passion of our Lord. 

.£c~- .*JI 9-y~>_ J-~JI -VI jjc oljT 

Dated (fol. 144a) Monday, the 17th September, a.d. 1834, and written by the Chaldean 
priest Zechariah, son of Francis, of the family of Khursan, in the time of the Bishop Basil Asmar. 

A clear but not handsome Mesopotamian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 
Broad margins. On the fly-leaf at the end is a register of three baptisms which took place in 
the village of Alkosh, and of which the oldest is in 1829. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 55.] 

68. 

206 x 157 mm. 80 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

A work on Confession, by the Jesuit P. Segneri, translated from Italian into Arabic, in 
a.d. 1739, in the town of Aleppo, by another Jesuit, P. Fromage. 

Begins : r ^JI 4JI JL* J^jj ^Jl V VI J^Li . . . U^JI l^\ ^ Jl lij^jl ^JJI 4! aJ-l 

^J\ <L. a^JI ^ <L-u ^ J~)l II* f\Z> o& JS3 . . . <fy-l\ <^J\ JJL- ^U> ^L ^Ul ^1 

No date. Written in a clear and good Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1750. Headings in 
red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. Two inscriptions by owners on fol. 8o«. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 40.] 
7 



9 8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— THEOLOGY 

.69. 

169 x 122 mm. 120 leaves. Thirteen and fourteen lines to the page. 
A theological work, written in a.d. 1772 by a Copt Uniat. 
The title of the work is 

BOOK OF ASKING QUESTIONS AFTER BEING IN DOUBT 
As the first leaf is missing in the MS., the above title is taken from the first page of the 
following MS., from which we also learn that the author was a layman. The title, Book of Asking 
Questions, is, however, found in the colophon. 

The work is divided into twenty bdbs and a khdtimah, of which there is an index on tt. 2-4. 

The author strongly maintains the Roman Catholic view against all other ancient Christian bodies. 

The first bob begins (fol. 50) as follows : .jUs-Vl <~i\S1 ±J5j J^~" ^ ±ry fi 4 ^^ vV l 

:U wsJI a.JI jl , and the last bdb begins (fol. 108&) as follows : ^^\ JU>t ^r - J ^-^ ^ 

.\»jf3 <-WJI feUI >J* J,\ vv. Jr-J 1 tf -^ & 

The khdtimah begins (fol. 1166) as follows : gUi J-. a\j\ £ VI Jl M \e ^ <j <^ 

Dated (fol. 1206) Thursday, 12th of the month of Bawunah, of the year 1534 of the Martyrs, 
which corresponds with the 14th Sha'ban, of the year 1233 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1817), and copied 
for the priest Peter, son of the priest Isaac Jesse ar-Rakit. 

^\lj^ Wj ^j dlaUj will &- jU* -** ^ J 1 JM J ^ VI ^ U - jli #* J ^ *"J -^ 

.y j^ji ^u ju^i ^ji .i o->. ^jii jjsti -^ »^s <**^ 

Written in a clear but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 
Two leaves are missing at the beginning, and two others between ff. 5 and 6. Fairly broad 

margins. [Mingana Chr. Arab. 32.] 

70. 

199 x 142 mm. 89 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

Same work as the preceding MS. The title which, owing to a lacuna, was missing in the pre- 
ceding MS. is found here, on fol. la, as follows : ju»J1 j* <i^~ £*i& ^l^VI -w ^U^-VI oO 
^j iLi MAV tt- J «iAJSj . . . juLUI \*J\ j*.\ w-oJVr . . . 4. ilitVl ^ ^tfj CJ^j *~-J cs* 1 ^ 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi, of about a.d. 1850. 
Headings in red. Well rubricated in the first part, but not in the second. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 33.] 



MINGANA COLLECTION 99 

71. 

216 x 160 mm. 326 pages. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

The dogmatic theology of the Capucin Father, Thomas de Charmes, who died in 1765, 
translated in 1826, in Rome, from Latin into Arabic, by Ignatius Peter Jarwah, West Syrian 
Uniat Patriarch, for the clergy of his church. 

U-,Vl Uptfl Ull <y **■ j r r . . . >jb .* Uy J-UI ^Ji., J*l$3i ^yS ^J^\ o^yll jf >£ 
ojj %> j dUi, Ul. ^ylSDlj tiLj ^JJ-I JIUVI jl^Jl djt>. o^r u->. o"*'^ 1 ^ ^ J 1 

Dated (p. 326) 2nd December, a.d. 1831, and written in Aleppo by Isaac Shukr, son of the 
priest Sulaiman of Mosul. 

JL^JI J\jJ\ jUL. ^J <y, j^ j^t ^ V^-V- j£ •*•■>•• • v 1 ^ 1 ^ &>* ^ *r? ^ ^ 

Clear Mesopotamian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. 

Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. Pages are numbered in Syriac numerals, but the 

copyist has omitted numbers 129 and 278. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 52.] 

72. 

228 x 165 mm. 217 leaves. Generally twenty lines to the page. 
A work containing thirty-four theological and mystical sermons. 

The work is by a Roman Catholic, possibly a missionary. 

No date. Written by two hands in a clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1820. The first 
hand extends from fol. 1 to fol 286. Ff . 29-330 are blank, and the second hand follows with 
sermons numbered 41 to 70. 

From the index found on ff. 16-26 we learn that the first part should have contained 
forty sermons. Actually it contains only four. From the index placed before the second part 
(ff. 33&-35«) it appears that the second part should have contained from sermon forty-one to 
sermon eighty-two, while actually it ends with sermon seventy. 

No date. The first part is written in a clear Syrian Naskhi, possibly by a European hand, 
and the second part is written in a cramped but legible Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1820. Head- 
ings in thick black characters in both parts, and sub-headings in red in the second part. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 78.] 

73. 

165 x no mm. 74 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

A work containing the Roman Catholic rules for the Sacrament of Penitence and Confession. 

JlytVI t5 Ju* I4, tfj^L) jLjll ^JiLT _i)L Jl^cVI j* ±)J> ^ ^\y <>~. o~* '&■> 3l-J 



I00 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-THEOLOGY 

The work, which contains an extensive enumeration of sins which have to be declared in 

confession, is anonymous. 

No date. Written in a negligent but clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1830. Mo 

lubrications. [Mingana Chr Amb gg] 

74. 

221 X 174 mm. 75 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 
A catechism of the Christian religion. 

This catechism is not according to the doctrine of the Roman Church, nor according to the 
doctrine of the Monophysites, because its author believes in two natures in Christ. It is more 
likely that it belongs to a Protestant Episcopalian body. 

The work proceeds by way of question and answer. 

Begins : ^j^ jf J5U $C y» $\ jl .451 a^j ^ JjVl J-all 

No date. Written in a clear Mesopotamia!), Naskhi of about a.d. 1850. Headings in black. 

No rubrications. ' * ^ . 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 37.] 

75. 

227 x 173 mm. 434 leaves. Generally twenty-two lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 10-4300 : A work on dogmatic theology, according to the doctrine of the Roman 
Catholic Church, translated from Latin into Arabic. 

The work has no introduction of any kind, and no name of author or translator. 

It is divided into two parts (kisms). The first part extends from fol. 1 to fol. 1070, and the 
second part from fol. 1080 to 4180. Ff. 422a and 4286 contain an index to the work. 

Dated 12th November, a.d. 1872, and written in the " Monastery of the Redeemer," by the 
Brother Daniel Khalil. 

Written in a mixed Syrian-Mesopotamian Naskhi. Main headings in thick black characters, 
and sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. 

B 

Ff. 4310-4340 : Three sermons, added by an owner of the MS., the first one of which is on 

fasting. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 27.] 



MINGANA COLLECTION 101 

VII 
MYSTICISM 

76. 

280 x 210 mm. 379 pages. Generally from sixteen to nineteen lines to the page. 
A collection of the sayings of the Fathers of the Desert and of other saints and mystical 
writers, often with short anecdotes about them. 

lyx* *ajL>-I lc ^_is*-aJl IJjb J*1Ij ^JJl *<X-JJ ju-»_-ull I VI Ij-^ v_a*»^i *^- 9 yJ 4^ l)y* IjJ . . . 

i_jU-Jl Zj~J\ S^ jl Li». (V «-»-»^ Ui J-*-* iLJH.*** t>^>^ M J»Wlj -L^ JUl J <or".j ^^** ^*"* ° 

.ol_^-JI oyi« Jl <fl»_^l ^^ Jy_ <y W; J^jJ 

The MS. is divided into two sections, the first of which contains, in alphabetical order, the 
names of the Fathers whose sayings are reported. This section embraces pp. 1-270, with the 
following subscription : -ajL—I iiCJ! pwjtfll j^j~d\ J»WI Uy: <J)J-\ ^ ^1 jU-Vl cyj 4)1 j^« ci- 

The second section embraces pp. 270-379, and deals with mystical sayings by anonymous 
Fathers, the first of which is : V ^J jL- y» ^if JjVI ^.Vl jc ijjX-VI i)>. ^jA\ j-^-Url li^l Jl, 

Pp. 1-2 contain a short introduction which begins : IjjS lyK"^A)1 jju-osll I VI jl J-5 jl UL^ 

The alphabetical section x is headed (p. 2) : ^ilVI J^>- yl» U4II «Jjj»- Js jw.oiJI I VI .Ulill 

.j-jJ^Lil ^-i.jiSII jU-l yjl 
The names of the Fathers whose sayings are quoted are : 

A 

(1) Pp. 3-13 : St. Antony. 

(2) Pp. 13-29 : Abbot Arsenius. 

(3) Pp. 30-38 : Abbot Agathon. 

(4) Pp- 38-42 : Abbot Ammonas (cr^y\). 

(5) Pp. 42-44 : Abbot Aslla C^-l). 

(6) Pp. 44-45 : Abbot Ammonus (^^l). 

(7) Pp. 46-47 : Abbot Ammon of Nitria (tS^ill j^* 1 )- 

(8) Pp. 47-48 : Abbot Job. 

(9) Pp. 48-49 : Abbot Abram (Abraham). 

(10) Pp. 49-50 : Abbot Areus (^jl) . 
(n) Pp. 50-51 : Abbot Alonius (c/jJ^'J* 

(12) P. 51 : Abbot Anphi (Apos), Bishop of Oxyrrhynchus {y*j-&} iij* L-iS-l JJI). 

(13) Pp. 51-52 : Abbot Apollo. 



1 The alphabetical order is according to the Greek alphabet, and Greek uncial letters, written on the right-hand side of 
the heading, separate each alphabetical section from the next. 



102 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. -MYSTICISM 



(14) P. 52 : Abbot Andrew. 

(15) P- 5 2 '• Abbot Agaius. 

(16) Pp. 52-53 : Abbot Ammonathus (j-M^I). 

B 

(17) Pp- 53-54 : Bishop Basil. 

(18) Pp. 54-58 : Abbot Bessarion. 

(19) Pp. 58-59 : Abbot Benjamin. 

(20) P. 60 : (Bishop) Gregory Nazianzen. 



r 



(21) Pp. 60-66 : Abbot Gelasius. 

(22) P. 66 : Abbot Garenthius (cryZjr)* 



(23) Pp. 66-71 : Abbot Daniel. 

(24) Pp. 71-73 : Abbot Dioscorus. 



E 



73-76 : St. Epiphanius of Cyprus. 

76-77 : St. Ephrem Syrus. 

77-79 : St. Eucharistus the Layman. 

79-80 : The priest Eulogius. 

80-81 : St. Euphranius. 

81-82: St. Euladius(o-^l). 

82-84 : Abbot Evagrius. 



(25) PP 

(26) Pp 

(27) Pp 

(28) Pp 

(29) Pp 

(30) Pp 

(3i) PP 

(32) P. 84 : Abbot Eudaminus (jjJyfoy) • 

Z 

(33) Pp- 84-90 : Abbot Zenon. 

H 



(34) Pp. 90-91 : Abbot Elijah. 

(35) P- 9 2 : Abbot Herachus. 



e 

(36) Pp. 93-100 : Abbot Theodore of Parme. 

(37) Pp- 100-10 1 : Abbot Theodore of Antinoe. 

(38) Pp. 101-102 : Abbot Theodore of Scete. 

(39) P. 102 : Abbot Theodotus. 

(40) Pp. 102-105 : Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria.^ 

(41) Pp. 105-108 : Abbess or mother Theodora (o>»j\? C\) . 

I 

(42) Pp. 108-120 : Abbot John the Dwarf. 

(43) P. 121 : Abbot John who was in the " general monastery. 1 



MINGANA COLLECTION 103 

(44) Pp. 121-124 : Abbot Isidore. 

(45) Pp. 124-127 : Abbot Isaac, " the priest of the cells." 

(46) Pp. 127-13 1 : Abbot Joseph. 

(47) Pp. 131-132 : Abbot Jacob. 

(48) P. 132 : Abbot Irachus (^jl) . 

(49) Pp. 132-133 : Abbot John the Servant. 

(50) P. 133 : Abbot John of the Cells. 

(51) Pp. 134-135 : Isidore the Priest. 

(52) .Pp. 135-137 : Abbot John the Persian. 

(53) P. 137 • Abbot John of Scete. 

(54) Pp. 137-138 : Abbot John, the disciple of Abbot Paul. 

(55) Pp. 138-139 : Abbot Isaac of Scete. 

(56) Pp. 139-140 : Abbot Joseph of Scete. 

(57) Pp. 140-142 : Stories told of Abbot John the Dwarf. 

K 

(58) Pp. 143-145 : Abbot Cassianus. 

(59) Pp. 145-150 : Abbot Carinus (Cronius) (crytjty • 

(60) P. 150 : Abbot Copres (<£^) . 

(61) Pp. 150-151 : Abbot Cyrus of Alexandria. 

A 

(62) Pp. 151-152 : Abbot Lucius. 

(63) P. 152 : Abbot Lot. 

(64) Pp. 152-154 : Abbot Longinus. 

(65) Pp. 154-173 : Abbot Macarius, the Egyptian. 

M 

(66) Pp. 173-179 : Abbot Moses, followed by the seven " chapters " sent by him to Abbot 
Poemen ty*y, U J* ,yy M l*Ujl J_^ ^)- 

(67) Pp. 179-184 : Abbot Muthues (^J**). 

(68) Pp. 184-186 : Abbot Milisius (Meletius). 

(69) Pp. 186-187 • Stories told of Abbot Muthues. 

(70) Pp. 187-188 : Abbot Megathius (6j-V*)« 

(71) Pp. 188-189 : Abbot Mios (cO-»). 

(72) Pp. 189-190 : Abbot Mark, the Egyptian. 

N 

(73) P. 191 : Abbot Nilus. 

(74) Pp. 191-193 : Abbot Nistaron (Nastir) (jjLlJ), 

(75) Pp. 193-195 : Abbot Nicon. 



104 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

s ' 

(76) Pp. 195-196 : Abbot Xonus {j£y£). 

O 

(yy) Pp. 196-198 : Abbot Olympius. 

n 

(78) Pp. 198-233 : Abbot Poemen. 

(79) Pp. 233-237 : Abbot Paul. 

P 

(80) Pp. 238-242 : Abbot Rufus (Rufinus), a monk from Rome, who came to Scete. 

(81) Pp. 242-250 : Abbot Sisoes. 

(82) Pp. 250-252 : Abbot Sylvamis. 

(83) Pp. 252-253 : Abbot Simon. 

(84) Pp. 253-254 : Abbot Sarmatas (i/lU^-). 

(85) Pp. 254-256 : Abbot Serapion. 

(86) Pp. 256-257 : Abbess Sarah pJJI L). 

(87) Pp. 257-264 : The virgin and teacher Syncletica. 

T 

(88) Pp. 264-265 : Abbot Tithoes. 

(89) Pp. 265-266 : Abbot Timothy. 

Y 

(90) P. 266 : Euprasius (Euphraxius). 

<I> 

(91) Pp. 266-267 : Abbot Felix. 

(92) P. 267 : Polycarpus of Jerusalem. 

(93) Pp. 267-268 : Abbot Portas (u-U»». 

X 

(94) P. 268 : Abbot Chumah (.Uy-). 

(95) P. 268 : Abbot Cheiremon (^-y j^) . 

(96) Pp. 268-269 : Abbot Pisanthius. 

O 

(97) Pp- 269-270 : Abbot Or. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 105 

The second section is incomplete at the end, and the text breaks off with the end of the 24th 
quire. The last anecdote deals with an Egyptian monk who stayed in a village near Constanti- 
nople in the time of Theodosius the Younger. The final words are : \y»- J»j }U5 JT \**\j\ 4J Jlsj 

. . . -IJjC- J* «iAlJi ^ J& Vj-O ^ ^^ J^* ^O >US llj ,_*-»j 
Some headings in this section are : 
P. 311 : Anecdotes about solitaries (^a>-yJI jU-l). 
P. 321 : Sayings about the overcoming of desires : (S^\ \>.J* J Jy 

P. 326 : On the combats that come to us from fornication : ^1 oVtsll «_A j Jlylj jU-I 

.Ujll 4, IL-I- 

P- 365 ' On the fact that we should not judge anyone : lo>-1 jJi jl ^ j-jJ- jl (J ii» <il j Jlyl 
P. 366 : On the fact that we should avoid doing good works in order that they may be seen 
by others: j-UAJ »j\£\ j^p Li J*J VI &£ -ul j 

P. 377 : On obedience : 4>.jjuJI ^lUl : _>U-I 

P- 379 : On humility : ^Dl *ily j 

No date. Written on Egyptian vellum, in a Naskhi hand of about a.d. 950. Some diacritical 
points by the first copyist, and some others by subsequent scribes or owners. Headings in red. 
Broad margins. 

The quires are marked both in Greek and in Syriac on the left-hand page, in Greek at the 
top of the page and in Syriac at the bottom of the page. The end of each quire is further marked 
at the bottom of the right-hand page, in Syriac only, and not in Greek. A later owner has written 
an Arabic numbering in words (and not in numbers) over the Syriac numbering, except on the 
final page of quire 23, and at the beginning and the end of quire 24. 

Some words the ink of which had begun to fade have been re-inked by an owner. 

Pp. 18-21, 30, 40, 80, 81, are supplied by a later hand, on paper. 

On the recto of p. 1 is a dedication of the MS. to the monastery of St. Elijah, situated east 
of Shaikh al-Hadid, in the handwriting of the priest Ballat, son of Ibrahim. The beginning of the 
dedication, which contained the date, has been obliterated from the vellum, and the words which 
appear clearly are : " seven hundred and sixty of the Creation." The words " six thousand " 
can also be read with a fair degree of probability. 6760 of the Creation corresponds with a.d. 
1252, which on paleographical grounds appears also to be the date of the dedication. 

^ji- Ul jU jj> p*j, m ^sjJI IJjb .jv.1 jv»l o a1j~ a^JI <*ii J LA! ajL- ju-o ty* r^i <-*^' o . . . 

tf *}j£- dUJJ JcUil jjC . . . <LA_}I -I <c-l -I j_jTJlJI jjjJI <-a>- ^c <>-j>-\ <£jLaill ja Js~\ ^1 JujJ-l TtJii 

.-jbl^.1 ^,1 J»y, iJ j!i\ <i^3i J J&A »j>jd\ IIa. tjS} . . . «*l^ *~JI ja) 4--JJ <&£b> ?£■ 0*3 4^ 

On the same page there is a Garshuni (Arabic in Syriac characters) inscription which says : 
" The total of pages is 360 " (ouajo Jdo *jl oi^o^x). This induces us to suppose that one 
quire only is missing at the end. 

Two fly-leaves on paper at the beginning contain in Arabic a Synaxarium of the Syrian 
Jacobites for the third, fourth, fifth and sixth days of October. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 1206.] 



106 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

77. 

218 x 145 mm. 256 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff . 1-48 : An abridgment of the theological and mystical work entitled : Paradise of the 
Mind, by the Coptic writer, Sail abu Fada'il ibn al-'Assal, who nourished in the middle of the 
thirteenth century. 

.<_ii 4)1 ^ JL-M ^1 jJ\ &)\ jUo.1 *-i j^ j:\ apA drs*jM s& • • • 

The work is divided into 12 fasls, of which an index is found at the beginning. The first 

fasl begins (fol. lb) : <i* <*-.».> u-ja/ll .1&-J jUVl *SU- J J/Vl J^» 

The last /asZ begins (fol. 41b) : jL J* ^ $ j Od» i>^VI .^ jt J ^ S? W1 ^ 

.I4I JjuJuJ! J..UUI u^l^l 

Dated on fol. 48a, the 6th hour of Friday, 15th of the Coptic month of Babah of the 
Coptic year 185 1. See below. 

B 

Ff . 486-1050 : An abridged translation into Arabic of the Syriac penitential and parenetic 

maimrd of St. Ephrem. 

The first one is an abridged translation of his letter to the monk John, in which he warns 
him not to be deceived by thoughts of itinerancy in the monastic life. 

The translation covers the following maimre of St. Ephrem, given here as they stand in the 
MS. : 2, 8-9, n, 28, 6, 42, 3, 7, 12, 16, 17, 24, 27, 30-32, 48, A, 10, 5, *3» *9> x 7> 25, 38, 18, 21, 36, 

49> 50, 17, 15, 52. , 

The translation from the last maimra begins on fol. 1046 as follows : jl . j^-b d u > j* 

.j^y, g r J\ r l J^l ^ lyu*l 1*1 lylf >UUI «>-^il KU 

C 
Ff. 1056-1496 : An abridged translation of the work entitled : Scala Paradisi, of John 
Climacus, by the same Safi ibn al-'Assal. 

The abridgment covers thirty-one chapters of the Scala. The thirty-first chapter begins 
on fol. 145ft as follows : y £-U)l j^Uil ^Ij ,^\J\ J^i o* ( sic ) dy^^3 &^ ^r 11 o* 



MINGANA COLLECTION 107 

The copyist states at the end that this copy was made from an original that was transcribed 
from a manuscript in the handwriting of the author Ibn al-'Assal, and that it was the fifth copy 
made from this original. 

D 

Ff. I50«-I9i6 : The translation into Arabic of the mystical works of the East Syrian writer, 
Isaac of Nineveh, by the deacon 'Abdallah ibn al-Fadl, from Antioch, who later became bishop, 
and died about a.d. 1053. 

CJD jl JJaAll j, 4$\j^ jj-L-lM J^UH j^-^^Jl J^> .j>»1 LUc **»J, J* 9 *-*! iS J ^ tji.^ «_>0 j~au£- 

The translation covers thirty-five chapters of the original Syriac. The first chapter begins 
(fol. 1500:) : .jb-j 4II J I49-U 4I i^JI ^^iill ^oill Jl» .JjVI yUl <>., and the last begins (fol. 1880) : 

.y C ~~JI ^ dUc Jy. J ISI ,jj±!lj ^^ vV' 

A few more extracts from the letters of the same Isaac of Nineveh are found on ff. z8gb-xgib. 
The copyist states that he transcribed this MS. from an original that was copied from a manu- 
script in the translator's handwriting ( J-»VI &*J j* %yu SmJ j* Jai) 

E 

Ff. 192-193 are blank. 

Ff. i94#-2i8fl : The 100 capita on Spiritual Knowledge by Diadochus, bishop of Photice 
in Epirus, who died about a.d. 450. 

This is the work that is praised by Photius (Coi. 201) as one drawn from experience and not 
from theory, and useful not only to those who wish to attain perfection, but also to those who 
wish to progress in it. Another MS. of the work is described by Graf, Catalogue de Manuscrits, 
p. 141. See references to Diadochus in Bibl. Patrum, Lugdun. 1677, vol. v., p. 884; Fabric, 
Biblioth. Graeca, Lib. v., ch. 14; Cave, Hist. Lit., vol. i., p. 442. 

Begins (fol. 194a) : J-l jrfVlj :>tf-l aljJ-1 ^ J*jl ^ </J J-h 5UVI ^Vl I4.I 

Ends (fol. 2180) : jynJIj I^T j&JIj 1*1* j^JI 4) ScUI *r/U ^ <~* Ji> yy JjJ» aJVI <iV 

The copyist states at the end that the above Safi ibn al-'Assal made his translation of the 
work of Diadochus from an old MS. that was illegible in many places, and that he was in search 
of a better MS. to fill in the gaps. 



io8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 



Ff. 2186-2300 : A discourse on love, and on the mystery of the next world, and on union 
with God. 

The discourse is anonymous in the MS., but we may assume that it is a translation from the 
East Syrian author John Saba, called in Arabic " the spiritual old man." This hypothesis is 
rendered probable by the works described under the following " G." 

Ends : <>l j. VI Jl ?\jj\ II4) j^Jli ,iUj jc-j jCir U&ljj oy-U 

G 

Ff . 2300-2500 : The mystical letters (translated from the Syriac original) of the aforesaid 
East Syrian writer, John Saba. 

Headed : 4.U-1 Jl I4. ^ «jj| JjLj 

The letters which are translated are : 1-8, 10-12, 14-15, 17-18, 23-25, 27-32, 34, 36-38, 43- 
44, 48. The first letter begins (fol. 230a) : ^J\ j\^\ ^Jl ^ijUl Jl J,G" >li £J- Jl JjVI 3LJ1 

The last letter begins (fol. 247a) : ^1 ^Ul ^_JI ©^, Uj j.1 451 y ibU . jy.-^ u*^ 1 

H 

Ff . 250-2560 : The first discourse by the same John Saba, on the Capita Scientiae. 

At the end of the work (ff. 2556-2560) there is an " apology " by the carnal brother of the 
author, to the effect that he is the carnal brother of John, and that it is he who collected the 
work of the author into book form. He further states that his brother, the author, had not even 
regular paper on which to write, and that he used to write only on bits of paper which he himself 
gave to him, or on a piece of wood, and that he used always to sign himself " the Pig." 

<iU <j\T f y, V jl 4)1 ^ v l53l II* J^U j. JS" jLl jui-l U^, ^oSJI y-l lit aZ\ jIJjcI 
•^ ^j isjf U U 0' <y J-*** Ci&~3 t>.> 1 >*! W^"^ JM jJk j£" t»j . • . ^jjl jl>-l aJU. ^-iT 
. . . *_*£>. ^j) jc ; j*3 a! u^-i ulijj j w^C ;^* jl& <i Y& u »jofr jis" ^j *» c£>"V y^" J ^^S" 
.^ji ost j^i ^ jijut vi 11* <_£& v tui 11* ^r ^ y j± ^Lj j <js; jiT ^jji r vi^ 

All the above Arabic translation of the works of John of Dalyatha, or John Saba, is more or 
less identical with the Syriac original, as preserved in Mingana Syr. 7. 1 The Arabic translation 
is, however, sometimes abridged. 

Three more MSS. of the work are described below. 

Dated Sunday, 27th of the Coptic month of Kihak, of the Coptic year 1851, which is 
said in the MS. to correspond with the 4th of the month of Ramadan, of the year 1250 of the 
Hi j rah (a.d. 1834), and was written by Nakhlah 'Abd as-Sayid, of the family of Ghazzawi. 

1 See Catalogue of the Mingana Collection, vol. i., pp. 24-25. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 109 

Neat and clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Very broad 
margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 21.] 

78. 

182 x 136 mm. 83 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

A work on mysticism. The beginning and the end are missing, and so no author's name 
is found in the MS. A later hand has written inside the cover : " I believe that it is written by 
John the Dailamite. Admonitions on the exercise of the spiritual labourers." 

This note, however, is erroneous, as the work is the famous Scala Paradisi of John Climacus, 
the Abbot of the Monastery of Mount Sinai, who died in 649. 

.^Jjl U>-jJ r-JjJl iJcST 

Three quires of ten leaves each are missing at the beginning, with the consequent dis- 
appearance of the first three Scalae, together with the beginning of the fourth. The fifth begins 
on fol. 16a, as follows : aoj**J1 ?y>-j ^ \y>\ .-L^JI \£\ Jc a^.U-1 i»-jjJi 

The last Scala found in the MS. is "the twenty-eighth, which begins on fol. 83a : 

Two leaves are missing between ff . 4-5 ; five between ff. 24-25 ; nine between ff . 34-35 ; 
one between ff. 73-74 ; and an unknown number of leaves between ff. 81-82. 

No date. Written in a bold Egyptian Naskhi hand, bordering on Kufi, of about a.d. 1450. 
Headings in red. Well rubricated. Narrow margins. Here and there a few words and sentences 
in Garshuni (see fol. 596). 

Numbers of quires in Syriac figures. The lower edges of the last leaf are torn, with the con- 
sequent disappearance of some words. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 6.] 

79. 

250 x 170 mm. 234 leaves. Generally eighteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. ib-g6a : The discourses of the East Syrian mystic writer, Isaac of Nineveh, translated 
from Syriac into Arabic. 

The discourses are forty in number. The first and last two begin as follows : 

Fol. 16 : SUVI j* jJy ^ £>UI u-b <y 451 Stie JU 

Fol. 13a : ^1 JUL o-Ui) 4)1 Jacl ijf iAf .JljJI ^J ^jU ^j&J Jfcil ^~JI 



no CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

Fol. 916 : .J\yM & \^Xb \e j~<£ Jb m M j~ t j^ ^ *~^ J&M Cf- W^J f^ ^ Jl 

Fol. 946 : jUVl J&- U u-U J\» .3^*11 *i ~^.y_ -if 4^1 U '^ , 0* e^ 1 jH 1 O c ty--^ 1 -^ Jl 
The subscription (fol. 96a) is : £-1 js*-l ^jU J^»Uil ^r*.-^ y^ 1 ^*V ,1 *^ 

One leaf is missing between ff . 18-19, 26-27, 4 6 "47- Another leaf is missing between ff. 54-57, 
and ff. 55 and 56 (numbered in Coptic as no and 241) are misplaced. One leaf is also missing 
between ff. 66-67, tw ° between ff. 74-75, two between ff. 82-83, and two between ff. 90-91. 

B 

Ff. 966-113& : Additional discourses of the above Isaac of Nineveh. 

These discourses are : 

Fol. gya : On spiritual theory. 

Fol. 996 : On the guard over the outward and inward senses. 

Fol. 102& : An account of what happened to a monk. 

Fol. 106& : A letter to a monk who loved silence. 

Fol. 107ft : 0n tne temptations into which God allows every one to fall* 

Fol. 1 11b : A second discourse on spiritual love. 

Two leaves are missing between ff. 98-99, and two between ff. 106-107, of which, however, 
one is found on fol. 201. 

C 

Ff. ii4a-235& : The mystical works of the Syrian writer John of Dalyatha, or John Saba, 
called by Arab writers " the spiritual old man." The works of this author are also found in 

Nos. 77 [21], 81 [22] and 80 M- 

As there is a lacuna of thirty-two leaves between ff. 122 and 123, the beginning of the work 
is missing, and for a complete list of the chapters see No. 80 M- 

There is misplacement of one quire of ten leaves, which should have followed fol. 180, but 
of these ten leaves, two are missing, and the other eight are numbered 114-121. Two other 
leaves are missing between ff. 228-229, and one between ff. 231-232. 

On fol. 121& begin the forty-eight letters of John Saba to various people. 

The series of these letters is continued on fol. 181, from the second to the forty-eighth letter. 
The section called Capita Scientiae begins on fol. 226. 

.^.-Jl e r _ lij UijT j*U il .ii^-JI ^33) J/W ^^ 

The MS. is incomplete at the end. 

No date. Written in a clear, handsome and bold Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1350. 
Headings in red. Fairly broad margins. 



MINGANA COLLECTION in 

In view of the fact that some leaves are misplaced, and others missing, I have reproduced 

in the margins, in European Arabic numerals, the Coptic numbers of the leaves, in order to 

facilitate future researches in the MS. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 54.] 

80. 

231 x 160 mm. 211 leaves. From twelve to fourteen lines to the page. 

The works of the above East Syrian mystic, John of Dalyatha, or John Saba, called in 
Arabic " the spiritual old man." 

The title of the book is given on fol. $b as follows : " The book of the spiritual saint known 
as the ' old man,' on divine gifts, on the visitation of the grace which God grants for the comfort 
and joy of the monks, on the spiritual visions, on the knowledge of mysteries and thoughts, on 
the combats of the demons and our struggle against them, on spiritual exercises and works, 
and on virtues and prayers." 

d£\) pvULtll ^j*. jtj jlGVIj lUM ijM Jcj UU 5 J! Ji\U\ Jcj ^Jj <y^^ ^ ^ ll ^% c^ 51 

On fol. 3a a later hand has given to the work a more modern title in rhymed prose, as follows : 
<^ fJ3 Jk*I \fi J2^ 411 **j Jyd\ ^U ^J^. jLJij JyJ\ «JjjmJI J^-jJI £~^ v^ ^ 

On ff. 36-5^ is an index of the contents of the volume. 



Ff . 6a-i2gb : The mystical maimri or discourses of the author. The maimrd are twenty- 
eight in number, and treat of different points of mysticism. 

The work begins with a prayer : 

>t >l ,;y»0 dLT :\\J ^i) Ujli j^ g£l ^1 4)1 #1 cr*- JI ^ '^ 

The discourses are : 

(1) Fol. 6a : On exhortation and watchfulness. 

(2) Fol. 14a : On the visitation of the Spirit granted to the monks. 

(3) Fol. 24a : On the demon of fornication and the blindness of darkness. 

(4) Fol. 30a : On the demon of blasphemy. 

(5) Fol. 33a : On dissipation and pride. 

(6) Fol. 35<z : On the love shown by the good angels. 

(7) Fol. 370 : On Theory. 

(8) Fol. 426 : On the fact that we must not blame the Fathers when they speak imper- 
fectly, in the measure of the capacity of their hearers. 

(9) Fol. 44b : On the Novices. 

(10) Fol. 476 : On prayer, spiritual natures, and the knowledge of the mysteries of God. 



H2 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

(n) Fol. 55/? : On the watch over our outward and inward senses. 

(12) Fol. 60& : On the fact of being voluntarily dead to the world. 

(13) Fol. 636 : On the confidence of the servants of God. 

(14) Fol. 646 : On the different kinds of the divine gifts. 

(15) Fol. 66a : On the mystery of the next world. 

(16) Fol. 70& : On the Holy Trinity. 

(17) Fol. 73a : On the gifts of the Spirit granted to those who contemplate God. 

(18) Fol. 786 : On the high joy that affects the lovers of God, who contemplate His glory. 

(19) Fol. 846 : On leaving the world. 

(20) Fol. 876 : Exhortations and advices on penitence. 

(21) Fol. 906 : On the revelations pertaining to the appearance of our Lord to His saints. 

(22) Fol. 946 : A discourse addressed to his brother, on how penitence is able to purify and 

cleanse the soul. 

(23) Fol. 1006 : Account of a vision seen by a " child of God," who offered divine sacrifice. 

(24) Fol. 102& : On the utility of fervour in monastic life. 

(25) Fol. 104a : On the love of God. 

(26) Fol. 112& : On meditation upon the Economy of our Lord. 

(27) Fol. 1 166 : On the vision of God. 

(28) Fol. 1256 : On the utility of the remembrance and contemplation of God. 

B 
Ff . 1296-1870 : A collection of forty-eight letters sent by the author to various people. 

The first and the last two begin as follows : 

Fol. 1296 : ^Vl jyll ^ Jl .jl^VI >lij ±t 3 r > **3 o*>* cr 1 ^ J 1 ^ ^^ 

Fol. 131a : .aUJI A j* J& ^aill ^ & J» V^l w^U £JsJI Jk. y \*\yr V W1 ^J 1 

Fol. x&ia : ^ u~f \ UJj .dy.Stih *«UI ^J 1 

Fol. 1816 : ^Ljl £>-* Uj j&i y* 4jl* 'Oj-jVIj ^ Wl ^J 1 

Between ff. 179 and 180, a missing leaf is mis-bound after fol. 187, and is now numbered 

as 188. 

C 

Ff . 1870-2086 : The three discourses comprising the author's Capita Scientiae. 

The first begins (fol. 187a) : g r J\ £j~* UJ ticjf ^U il .S^JI &»} J^ 1 ^ !l 

As stated above, fol. 188 is misplaced, and should have come after fol. 179. 

The second begins (fol. 1990) : UUa ^ 4\ o/Ju cJS' 1*1 .HjJ\ j>m) UtJI aIUJI , and the 

third (fol. 2040) : jlO ^> ->yN -^y^ 1 O'ii) ywi ;llaJI 



MINGANA COLLECTION JI3 

On ff. 2060-2070: is found the " Apology," by the carnal brother of the author, described 
above under No. 77 [21], page 108. 

Headed : IA* ^ jL> ^ii" J^ jl <^ JIjuJ-I ^..-ull y-l jljjcl ^,1531 IA* ;^j ^.1 : j^j 

D 

Ff. 2O70-2O8& : A letter of the author to his brother, who was leading a cenobitic life. 

No date. Written in a clear and handsome Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1450. Head- 
ings in red. Broad margins. Many vowels. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

Ff. 1, 69-73, 117-119, 205-209, are supplied by a later hand, and are dated (fol. 2086) Friday, 
6th of the Coptic month of Abib, of the year 1472 x of the Martyrs (a.d. 1756), and written by 
Ibrahim (Abraham) Samnan. 

<i-> iJjLJI ,_*..! <j-.iL. <u.J-l *£ ^ cfJJij . . . «-U!l jlju-< ~**\j>) <u"o oU>- Ju ... 4H jy». S^~ 

An inscription on the margins informs us that the MS. was bought by Bisharah Salib from 
the above Ibrahim, in 1478 of the Martyrs. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 30.] 

81. 

236 x 166 mm. 200 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

Another copy of the works of the East Syrian mystic John of Dalyatha, or John Saba, called 
in Arabic " the spiritual old man." 

Ff. ib-i20b : The twenty-eight mystical maimri, or discourses, of the author. 
The subscription (fol. 120&) is : JA-JI **£>j J^jJ' r*~^ ^^ j>U\ >Vy» \yl£j J 

Ff. 1210-181& : The forty-eight letters which the author sent to various people. 

Ff. 1816-2000 : The three discourses containing the author's Capita Scientiae. 

On ff . 1986-1990 is found the " Apology " by the author's brother, about which see above, 
No. 77 [21]. 

In the colophon we are informed that the translator of the works of John Saba from Syriac 
into Arabic was the deacon-monk John, who was helped by the priest-monk Abraham. 

^\J\ *j~s Ur -L^l <Jl)l Jl ol^JI iJJI ja j aJl j'UjJI «~dl iJj^-JI ^jJkSlI J& J-Sj *r 

.^Ijl ^\j\ yJ\ £ «>UI cr^l l*-j, 

Dated (fol. 2000) Wednesday, 24th of the Coptic month Kihak, 1595 of the Martyrs (a.d. 
1879), an d written by the monk Mark. 

j\SL~Jl «^Ull_j . . . Ij.^-il) &**J} L~»-_j iL-^i-j u-all <'^ di~& j±Z> oSj^} /*>}j f.-M ?y. (i °^ o» 

.i-l jl*JI as-l ^ja j.\ p-Vl. . . . 
1 Written in Coptic numerals. 

8 



ii 4 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

Written in a clear, bold, but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely 
rubricated. Broad margins. Numbers of leaves in Coptic numerals. 

A Coptic leaf from a Service-book is pasted inside the first cover of the book. 

A comparison of the text of the MSS. numbered 79 [54], 80 M and 81 [22] with that 
found in No. 77 [21] (F, G, and H) will show to what extent the text of the latter has been 
abridged. A comparison also of the text of the above MSS. with Mingana Syr. 7 shows that 
the Arabic translation of all the works of John Saba is very literal. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 22.] 



82. 

275 x 192 mm. 68 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 1-116 : The Profession of Faith of the Armenian-Coptic writer, the priest Peter Sada- 
manti, who nourished in the middle of the thirteenth century. 1 This Profession of Faith, which 
was written at the instance of Yusab 2 (Eusebius), bishop of Akhmim or Ikhmim, in the year 
976 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1260), begins : *U »LjVI p> 3UJI *o* ^oJI crjk Ul cr 1 --^ 1 v"^ ^ 

^tj\ ^1 us»\ yt-j. ut . . . wii-vi v vi jiT. . . ji*yyi >u*aai ^j <^>> *i— * &- ^ ^ >* 

<!U a) Jiil jl ^L. L a-**Jlj, and ends: ,*UjVIj Jm-J^Ij L4-2JI cX&>> ^jUI IUJI C~JI Split. 

B 

Ff. 116-346 : A treatise by the same Peter Sadamanti, written at the instance of the same 
Bishop Yusab, on " the disciplining of the soul in practical works." 

Headed : oLUi j ^Jull ^4* jJUi \j<& 4 ^1 jl Ul ^U J» yUjj, Ul ^ii-VI V V! jtf-u 

..juJ jucj <JuJ iJdl IU <iAii ^ o-li JjVI J^l ^ aS cJii U Ijir 

C 

Ff . 346-440 '• Tne history of a pious man of the city of Alexandria, by the same Peter 
Sadamanti. 

Headed : AVI ol^U <~ii 4)1 H ^.xJl <j*J* ^JJI J^UJI y VI Ul 4U U ^yu 0^5- tfXJ 

.U. iJjt. jlf J>-j jp Ij^l .<>l .jW^VI 

D 

Ff. 446-626 : The life of Isidore of Alexandria, by the above Peter Sadamanti. 

.^^iujuJi cO^t J-*^l vjVI <*-j» cillij ^j-uxJI j*jJu*»J ^^ r^i» <iL»y j^—*-.} O^ c£*x1j 



1 Cheikho in his work Catalogue des Manuscrits des A views Arabes Chretiens, p. 62, erroneously states that he lived in 
the middle of the eleventh century. 

2 Cheikho (ibid., p. 222) erroneously states that this Bishop Yusab lived in the fifteenth century instead of the thirteenth. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 115 

E 

Ff . 626-630 : A prayer by the East Syrian writer Isaac of Nineveh, taken from the thir- 
teenth chapter of his book. 

F 

Ff. 636-646 : Prayers by the Syrian writer, John of Dalyatha, or John Saba, called " the 
spiritual old man." The first prayer is taken from his work on " the demon of fornication." 

«4->- jy»J frUjll jlla~£» ^£ JjlJl ^Jl ^y» tj\>-jj\ rc^}\ J^5 -j* »}L» 

G 
Ff . 646-686 : Mystical extracts from the following works : 

(1) The book of the Abbot Shenudah (*pyd Ul J& ,y). 

(2) The discourse of the Abbot Pachomius (o"ysy£ Ul sjC ( y). 

(3) The speech of Macarius the Egyptian {ifyj&> fi/f ,y). 

(4) The work entitled Paradise of the Fathers (ju-ju! I jL*JI jll*. j>). 

The colophon attributes all the work to Peter Sadamanti : Jy ^ ibUI ^b3l Ijj» Jij j- 

No date. Written in a clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1840. Headings 
in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 20.] 



83. 

191 x 140 mm. 252 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

A mystical work by the Coptic writer Sim'an b. Kulayil * b. Makarah b. Abi l'Faraj, a 
monk in the monastery of St. John " the Dwarf " or John Kolobos 2 in Scete, who died at the 
beginning of the thirteenth century. 

The title of the work, as written at the beginning and on fol. 76, is : 

-u»-JI »Ju-j Ju Jul iijj 
THE GARDEN OF THE HERMIT, AND THE CONSOLATION OF THE SOLITARY 

Headed : <*-j jl _,JU]I .__ iJlr ju»- J I • J*-j jj y»)l <*j* <*j*> <~aJ* \*J&*.*aa ?***•*• J,\*> 4^1 juu ^jcj 

.AaJ>-Vl \j* ^r^l <j>J£ {sic) cSl ( j^-ull j»JU ^J»JlJ\ r-yll ^1 ^.l Zj\Za jj JJ& jil jL*— ^.J^' »Vj* 

1 So vowelled in. the MS. 

2 In Arabic Kaslr, Kusair, or Kusayyir. About a monastery of this name, see Abu Salih, Churches and Monasteries of 
Egypt, pp. 145 and 321-323. 



n6 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MYSTICISM 

The work is divided into twelve chapters (kaul), the first of which begins, on fol. gb : 
.l^V JL? 4)1 ASli- J&\ j r V\ 3 jLiVI ttl* J*-l j, JjVI Jyll, and the last of which begins, on 

fol. 185a : <UUII iL^Ji ;^JIj ?UJI LJl ^IrjVI J>-l ^ y* jbl Jyli 

Ff. ib-ga contain the introduction to the work, which ends with an index to its twelve 
chapters. 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1380. Headings in red. 
Profusely rubricated. Numbers of leaves in Coptic numerals. Ff. 1, n-12, 38-39, 229-232, 
are supplied by a modern hand, and ff. 239-252 by a slightly more ancient hand. 

On fol. ga is an inscription by an owner of the MS. Hanna-Allah Ghattas, known as 
Mubasharah Dunwan al-Hawali, who states that he bought the MS. for himself in n 16 of the 
martyrs (a.d. 1400). 

. . . i-J^Jl j*C Jl^i-1 jly^ IJ^S- j+d\ J-UaC $\ "(f . • • jf^ Jk-N f.j& *».j t)- 8 * a* *&* 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 31.] 

84. 

215 x 162 mm. 208 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

Another copy of the preceding mystical work by the Coptic writer Sim' an b. Kulayil * 
b. Makarah b. Abi l'Faraj. 

The title of the work, as written at the beginning, is as above : 

ju>- ji »yu"j -^y^ *^ij 

Ff. la-Sb contain the introduction to the work which ends with the index of its twelve 
chapters. 

Dated (fol. 2080) Wednesday, 20th of Barmahat, 1448 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1732), and 
1 144 of the Hij rah, and written by the deacon Bisharah Ghattas at-Tabniiti. 

.4-1 jj-L^. --VI JyJ\ u"U^ oU- . • . jii-l tif~~* Jl ^-Ullj My* k- S Mt Jj • • • jU^VI Ij^iil p*».jlj 

Clear and handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly 

broad margins. Numbers of leaves in Coptic numerals. Ff . i-io, 76, 170, 175, 177-178, supplied 

by a later hand. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 26.] 

85. 

152 x 100 mm. 133 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The spiritual meditations, to the number of fifteen, composed in a.d. 1690 by the Armenian 
writer Makardij al-Kasih, son of 'Abd al-Ahad, 2 who died in the first half of the eighteenth 
century. 

1 Again so vowelled in the MS. 

2 Cheikho in his Catalogue des Manuscrits des Aut. Arab. Chr it. (p. 195) states, I do not know on what authority, that 
the author's father was called 'Abdallah, instead of 'Abd al-Ahad. The present MS., which was written while the author 
was still alive, gives the name of his father distinctly as 'Abd al-Ahad. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 117 

Title : JU>VI Uu& j jUiOl JJ; 

THE SHADOW OF PERFECTION 

Headed : IjiityJ ««*JI e^o Uju- J»,L«j J y*lr y^ <-i- Uj-vc o^lr <b- 0J14J ju j . . . o VI *~* 

j JLSJI Jk UU-j .X-^d) jwJj iUZ-"J • — «Jl <L* .A>-VljuC ^.1 M.M&I gsijCi ^iill l^.} -X9 oli I 

JU=VI ^iJ& 
An index of the fifteen meditations is on ff. i6-2«. 
The meditations are often sub-divided into kisms. 

The first meditation begins (fol. 26) : tt jJI ^ill vJU .l^Vjjij o">^bl i^i. j J_jVl Jul:! I 

.*UiVI juaj ^ J/yi C U?VI J ImJII 

The last meditation begins (fol. 127a) : cJi» . J._Ua!I ^-yj <cltl ( y M> . j ^lc ^li-l J* Id I 

.i-l amaIIi iij-JI jj**^' 

Dated (fol. 130a) Friday, 15th of June, a.d. 1693, and written by Ibrahim (Abraham), 
son of Dimitri of Aleppo. 

£~~JI j\«~r_> <r%*j ^L^-j will <L, (sic) jlj*. jtfi ^a j^c ^-w-l j <-J~l -_^ JjLJl ,^1331 1.1* yi- 

It will be seen that the MS. was written three years after its composition by its author. 

Clear and good Syrian Naskhi. Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings 
in red. Well rubicated. Red rulings. Broad margins. 

On fol. 1316 is found the following Arabic proverb : "If bodies are burdened to excess, 
tongues will express dissatisfaction." 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 91.] 

86. 

156 x 98 mm. 286 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The Introduction a la vie divote of St. Francois de Sales, who died in 1622. 

.(J - _J~- , Vl-' l y~*~jji ~jjJLU 0jL.il (Ji-JUi ^jll) 

The translator does not mention his name in the preface (ff. yb-ga), but he was the Jesuit 
Pierre Fromage, who died in 1740. 

The book is divided into five juz's, sub-divided into fash, of which an index is found on 
ft. xa-ya. 

The translator's preface begins: jUo-VI «p-j. Jyij . . . Jyll II* j+.£ jJI <il ^J-l £VI I4.I JW 

No date. A clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1750. Headings in thick black characters, 
and sub-headings in red. Well rubicated. Red rulings. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 90.] 



n8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— PHILOSOPHY 

87. 

301 X 205 mm. 237 leaves. Twenty-seven lines to the page. 

The third part of the book of the Spiritual Meditations of the Jesuit Louis Dupont, who 
died in 1624. ^j,, ^j, ^j Uyj ^y, ^ ^ j b , ^, 

The MS. contains eighty-seven Meditations. 

Dated 27th of September, a.d. 1825, and written by Joseph, son of Cyriacus Zanbakah. 

(sic) j^LI yv <J <i>» ?\j&\ o^i • • • &JJ j*ylj5 ,\»l «— «--^ ^.uJi . . . ^JAll juJI olill *ju. <iic oil 

Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad 
margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 60.] 



VIII 
PHILOSOPHY 

88. 

222 x 162 mm. 76 leaves. From seventeen to twenty-six lines to the page. 
A philosophical work written in a.d. 1751, by the Basilian monk, the priest Joachim, who 
died in 1772. 

Title : ^yi UUVI 

The work is incomplete at the beginning and at the end. Something is also missing between 
ft. 6-7, 26-27, 54-55, 55-56, 63-64, 69-70. 

Divided into fanns, makalahs, babs, fasls, juz's, and kisms. The first extant division is 
Bab ii, the first fast of which treats of the Tree of Porphyry. 

On fol. za is an inscription by a later hand, giving the title of the work, and the date of 
its composition as June, 1751, in the monastery of St. Isaiah : j~\ 3 \ ^ uJ\? , J. <iUl oUUVI 
U^l jU j >* j \yo\ iL- jl^_>- . This inscription corresponds with that of MS. 679 of Paul Sbath. 1 

No date. Written in a clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1770. Headings in thick black 
characters, and sub-headings in red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 68.] 

89. 

203 x 145 mm. 189 leaves. Twenty-four lines to the page. 

An extensive work on philosophy, embracing, as usual, its two distinct parts : metaphysics 
and physics. 

1 Bibliothique de Manuscrits Paul Sbath, vol. ii., p. 40. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 119 

The work is divided into 30 makdlahs, sub-divided into fasls. As a page is missing at the 
beginning, no author's name and no title are found in the MS. The work, however, is by a 
Christian author, as quotations are found in it from the Book of Genesis and from Daniel (fol. zb), 
and from St. Basil of Czesarea (fol. 173&). It is also under the influence of the Roman Catholic 
theology, as on ff . 53a and 54a there is a reference to the weight of matter as distinguished from 
its essence, in connection with the consecrated bread and wine of the Eucharist, etc. 

The first eight makdlahs begin : 

(1) Missing, owing to the disappearance of the first leaf. 

(2) Fol. 56: ^JaM ^JLl ^U J oUl 3UI 

(3) Fol. 6b : ;1UI JUL J J/Vt J-aII .Wj*-J ^ Ui J ^ yUJI 

(4) Foi. n6 : y i Jy i\ jrv* ji ,jki .w-iyo •^ , J y Wi yui 

(5) Fol. 21a : o^-allj IbUl >tj»-J j <— ^ < J ^ 

(6) Fol. 246 : o^-Jlj ^Ul *Ul J UsUI aJUJI 

(7) Fol. 30a: WiJlrj oj-JIj fcUl J »I>-VI j a-UI aIUI 

(8) Fol. 32a : i^yt JUL. j J/yi jliM .iJLJI ^ Ml 3UJ1 

On fol. 1896 is an inscription by an owner, Thomas Liika (Luke), dated a.d. 1850. Another 
inscription states that in 1867 the MS. passed into the ownership of the priest Jacob Na'mo, 
who bought it for 25 piastres from the priest Peter Rassam. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Mesopotamian Naskhi of about a.d. 1800. 

Headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. Well rubicated. The words 

" second quire " written in East Syrian characters at the bottom of fol. 236 suggest that the 

copyist was a Chaldean or East Syrian Uniat. 
rj [Mingana Chr. Arab. 48.] 



IX 
SCIENCE 

90. 

220 x 160 mm. no leaves. Generally from twenty to twenty-six lines to the page. 

A. 
Ff . 16-136 : An astronomical and geographical treatise on the creation of the angels, the 
world, the stars, the sun, the moon, and the constellations, attributed to Jacob of Edessa, the 
West Syrian writer, who died in a.d. 708. 
JUIj £*JI ttls- #> <J jvJI ^UJI ^fim \%^s tf all r yJ> J-. 0* *&* ^ *n *■*¥••- 



120 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— SCIENCE 

The work is divided into twelve chapters, the first of which begins on fol. 16 : JjVI J-aill 
•Ipl jj» cA'j »U-.I j*« ts^Ji ^ jf jl\»- y» ^JJI 4II ^ .&>JI <2li- jc o ^, and the last 
begins, on fol. 10a : ^>3j^\^ Jj.jyJI uslUlj »LJij «^JIj J^Mj AVI ei}te-l J^ ^Y S* 9 

On fol. 136 is a rough map of the world, based on the seven climates of Ptolemy. 

B. 

Ff . 140-356 : An astronomical work entitled : ^k J^ 

Begins : ib\»l a Jis- <u-»l iJjL" 4II jl 

The work is divided into sixty short babs, the first three of which are omitted. The fourth 
bob (i.e. in reality the first) begins, on fol. 14a: jl Je\ .iuJI Js\f £&j* *»j~» ,j *}J\ vV' 
*>•-» V J f*« <fJLlAl^ ry- 3 , and the last begins, on fol. 35a : I^IjAj wJl -J151 J._Vj a»^ J jy- yl 

c 

Ff . 356-1106 : A collection of many astronomical, astrological, and occasionally geographical 
works, by Christian and Muhammadan authors, among which may be mentioned the following : 

(1) Fol. 356 : jl^lj JJJI Jl/M \ jiyi <*ji obT. The author is not mentioned, but he was 

Ahmad b. Yiisuf Shihab ad-Din b. 'Abbas Azhari Mikati. The work is divided into four fasls. 

(2) Fol. 506 : A treatise on the seven climates, attributed to an astronomer called 
Philoponus : -J15VI.J J±\$\ £*.£ Jc jj-yyJui J*J\ Jy ^ JL-U- 

This Philoponus is to be identified with the Greek writer John Philoponus or John 
Grammaticus, some treatises of whom were translated into Arabic. By the Christian Arabs 
he is called Yahya al-Iskandarani, and more commonly Yahya al-'Askalani. 

D 

Ff . 806-906 : A treatise in poetry, containing astrological matter dealing with Horoscope. 

The title of the treatise is (fol. 810) : oUl i^-Vl j iilfll <!LJI 

The baits follow the order of the Arabic alphabet. 

Begins, after the Basmalah : jl Jlr 4)1 Jl ^iill jljli . . . Jj^J-l Uai. *rj\J\ cJ^ U «uli 

.oUl i^j-VI J olS3l <1UJI I411-J . . . l-U \yJl\ c*->c-U jui^JI jl* 

No date. Written in a cramped Egyptian hand of about a.d. 1790. Many astronomical 
diagrams. Headings in red. 

Ff . 76-90 are by an older hand of about a.d. 1750, and were added to the MS. by the binder. 
The beginning of the first of the two treatises contained in these leaves is missing, between 
ff. 75-76. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 51.] 



MINGANA COLLECTION I2I 

X 
HISTORY 

91. 

218 x 1 80 mm. 11 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

A MS. on vellum, containing lives of some Apostles and other treatises. 

A 

Ff. 1-40 : The Invention of the Holy Cross, by the Empress Helena. 

Incomplete at the beginning. 

Ends : £.-. Jl 9y*^ ^-^- »Jl.j kj*'-^* £* ^^ ^ o^H »^-^j »_~LJI Ju» ^ JS JLutfll <iVI J**.j 

B 

Fol. 4a : A discourse of St. Epiphanius of Cyprus, containing praises of the Virgin. 

fj*j\J £J+ cTjS <~««-l cT^JU-l ^-uH Jy ^ (5 iuAi. ^..y-jL. io-Jlj j^^Mi-^ tsV-JJ ts*^ 1 ^-Jl 

.4V1 :Jlj 
Begins : $fjju. jJ. 2w j <IVI SjJIj ^_l^ U *Li L»l 

C 

Ff . 46-80 : The history of the Apostle Philip, and his evangelisation of Carthage. 

.LJI Jl liju- .Sj.** JLw li»-li»^ii I4] Jli <i-U Jl Cm L.JOC yc..»> J I 

Begins: Ujl-» ^^,1 L. j^JidU J^jjl \>jV Ju*M:J1 lylT* il 

Ends : Jl jJ-Ul UrVI «-a-j iJjUl ^JUI ^ii ol_^U «* SyklLll *j*j\* jyll ^ ^JuJI c*Ij}1* 

•(>! #vJ»Vl Jul 
A leaf is missing between ff . 4-5 and ff . 5-6. 

The story is found in some other MSS. of my collection. Cf. Wright, Apocryphal Acts of 
the Apostles, i., 74-79, and ii., 69-92. 

D 

Ff. 86-116 : An extensive portion of the beginning of the Acts of Thomas. 

.^s^Jl li-t— A.c-1 U jic JU^JI ,jpj\» JO il ^}^3 rc~Ul t/Uy j+~» \1a ^y^-j JjS) ^Vl re~~ J I 

Begins : -4L l^jf U Jl \f*~S\j Jbj^l jvpJLJI l^»*i-l U 



122 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

Incomplete at the end. The last words of the extant text are : J* li. JL\ ^ jUj J jli 

The story is much shorter than the Syriac text and its Greek translation, as edited by 
M. Bonnet, Acta Apost. Apocr., ii., 99-288. 

The present MS. is the oldest in any language, either Syriac, Greek or Arabic, etc., which 

contains the Acts of Thomas. 

Thick veUum. No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about A.D. 830. 

Headings in red. Fairly broad margins. 

Coarse geometrical patterns separate the treatises. The main divisions of the text are 
marked by a series of patterns composed of red and black dots. Three of these patterns are 
used at the end of a longer section, and one at the end of a lesser section. 

The characters used in the present MS. are thicker and bolder than those used in No. 43 [93]. 
Both MSS. seem to have been written in one country, possibly in Egypt. There is a pronounced 
paleographical affinity between them, but the initial Alif has not the sloping stroke to the 
right as well marked as in No. 43 [93]- 

See No. 43 [93]- . , , .. , 

It may here be stated that these two MSS. appear to contam the earliest translations from 
Greek into Arabic (in the domain of Patristic and Apocryphal literature) that have come down 
to us in manuscript form. No earlier MS. in the above two branches seems to be found in Mount 
Sinai or in the Vatican, which contain the oldest documents in Christian Arabic literature. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 94.] 

92. 

144 x 102 mm. 283 leaves. Generally seventeen, thirteen and nineteen lines to the page, 
according to the hand used in the MS. 

A 

Ff . xa-igb : The Acts of St. John the Evangelist, attributed to the deacon Prochorus. 

A leaf is missing at the beginning, which contained the first three lines of the text. The 
following heading is taken from fol. 16 of the next MS., No. 93 [84]- A leaf is missing between 
ff. 6-7, 12-13. 

JL-Ldl ^ji U4JI Jjl ,jJUL-l jj-Jdl -r-i uvy-V, u~>.^ V^^ u^f^ &£ O 1 . 1 ^x ; -C* • • • 

It will be noticed that here also, as in Nos. 44 [83M] and 93 [84A], it is stated that 
Prochorus was related to St. Stephen Protomartyr. 

The Acts correspond (with some important variants) with those published by Mrs. Lewis, 
Acta Mythologica Apostolorum (Horse Semiticse, No. III., pp. 31-46). 

Begins : SJL-1-1 Jl JuO^I \y^\ tfyO*. W** ^ ^ ^ ^ J 1 £>-J vJ 1 ■>*"* •*•. «^ 

Ends : w**** J >->y£* ^3 &JuM J <j* iSsr ^ ^W^Vlj Jillj ^.^ , 0* *** J^ ^ £*"■? 

.i-\ uVl re—. \J^3 .!-*>■ _^f 



MINGANA COLLECTION 123 

B 

Ff. 19&-25& : The Acts of the Apostle Philip, who preached the Gospel in the town of 
Ifrikiyah. 

J! l^UI *j) ***j*' **-**■ Uj y-i l^' Cr~*^ P >***-■ ^^J UaVIj Uij i~dr cfy}^ ""j^ 1 aJA • • • 

.re— J I jlcVl 

Like the preceding Acts of John, the present Acts of Philip correspond more or less faithfully 
with those published by Mrs. Lewis (ibid., pp. 51-55)- 

Begins : yjl Ll»j .^L U-i _^_ ^io".? j^sjlt J~?~ Jc- ^>^l \y^>-\ U lyo 
Ends : i-l ^Jl **l l*y«j ^\ ol^l ,y ju^* 4^ ^3-^ C3^~j *»•*** j* 'i^j**^ 

C 

Ff. 260-330 : The Acts of the Apostle Bartholomew, who preached the Gospel in the town 
of Alwah. 

The Acts of St. Bartholomew are different from those published by Mrs. Lewis, ibid., pp. 
1 1-23, but are more or less similar to those found on pp. 58-66. 

Begins : A}\ Jl g£ j 1 cTJ^V. <*<- J^ <JUI j-** \y~>®3 V^ 1 l r^ u f^ 1 ^ J o^ 

Ends : i-l ^.Vlj ^Vl *~* Ut && j.^ ***** J' ->^-J rjj" **■** j* £V*-J 

D 

Ff. 330-450 : The Acts of Thomas, who preached the Gospel in India. 

.JU4II ^ oIjJ^ Uj jU jj^-ull ybllall JuJldl _,.>■ 

More or less identical with Mrs. Lewis's edition (ibid., pp. 67-78). 

Begins : jU-VI •Juod _^ tr^JI j* «~~JI f*~*1 ^ju- **ti «*»» jo 

Ends : i-l Ijj^cj l_pc~ * jwf U_y_ j^U- l^*Ulj ^ju Jc 4^ \»\jf\ ^1 i^Udlj olVI lj^i?j 

A leaf is missing between ff . 33-34. 

E 

Ff. 450-540 : The Acts of St. Matthew, and his preaching the Gospel in the " Town of the 
Priests " (Hierapolis) . 

.<453l ttju \ U-i-, ^1 JUVIj JLjft/l </■ SjUj 

More or less identical with Mrs. Lewis's edition (ibid., pp. 83-91). 

Begins : jjjJI aM; j* ptfrje •**» c/jjI-^Ij t^J*. jo 

Ends: yjl i.*^ -4) *cbj -uc- ^ JV5 <il ^ j^L- ^.xie j. ^^ ^Ul o»_y ^ liUj ^.ue ftflj 



I2 4 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

F 

Ff . 54«-59a : The Acts of Jude, the brother of our Lord, who preached the Gospel in the 
town of Suriyah and in Jazirah (North Mesopotamia). 

These Acts are not found in Mrs. Lewis's edition. 
Begins : JUl lj*-ij ac^I *>->.> oyJ\ S-fr <> V^ 1 l r^ ^ ^ 

Ends : g~J\ fj~\ v Jl ^W ^ j&" li*J yjl f %- ^ ^ ljr>j t>j" ^r (^ l *F-« 

.g r J\ gj-J yjl f %- ^J? jf- J- *iti ^ ^ 

G 
Ff. 596-6ia : The Acts and the Preaching of James the Just, called " the Carnal brother of 
our Lord," who preached the Gospel in Jerusalem and became its first bishop. 

^Jbjjl ^UJ a! £> ^JJI a*4- jlj jJL-1 V JI y-1 U-JI j.x-11 JC--J1 £y~ vJI i-Jr v y» l-u 

#Cr Jl j^J yj! ^1 jt I4J gJrj Wic Ul-I jU atjIl. j»j 

More or less identical with Mrs. Lewis's edition (pp. 120-122). 

Begins : ^k-j J j*-J ^>J\ _^>- <JUI ^Jx. t^-JSJ JLodl l^*2>-l U jS? 

Ends : £-1 ^ aJI Ij^i- ^jl Jl ^j IjU Ui 

H 
Ff. 6ib-6$a : The Martyrdom of the above James the Just, which took place on the 
23rd October. 

j/yi j^ #> d3j^h JW j o-u jlT ^JJi djUl JuUi VJ )i y-i j^juJ! v y-. j^ *^ 

More or less identical with Mrs. Lewis's edition (ibid., pp. 122-125). 

Begins: r^-JI ~-l l^j lalij (J^jjI J* vJ* J*"' V^". J ^ cri.^' -^ ^ J 

Ends : i-l a>cJI a! ^JJI ^.-Jl ^—_ yjl jl j\>- y.>*^l ^^Jl ^ ^ a*-j j£ jl 

I 

Ff . 656-69^ : The Martyrdom of St. Mark the Evangelist in the city of Alexandria on the 
25th April. 

Somewhat different from the text published by Mrs. Lewis (ibid., pp. 126-129). 
Begins : -L.}dl 1^— 51 ^JJl jL jl j jo «~~JI *y* j — II *VI j* <i- j£$5 *lc J 
Ends: <rl_jLa» <rj.i^i ci-a !•&> ^J\ ^Ji» ^jU» >U Jc- jl — i ^ jij^uJij ,j-*v-\ <j <9 "^ o^J 



MINGANA COLLECTION 125 

J 

Ff. 696-736 : The Martyrdom of St. Luke, which took place on the 18th October. 

More or less similar to Mrs. Lewis's edition (ibid., pp. 130-133)- 

Begins : <~..?j ii-u cfj^". **** 0" <W <>** -J~0^ 1^*— al vJ jo 

Ends: \A jOll dUJI jjjU f U J JjVI 3^" ^ & o^ r * ^ V^ J ^ ^ 

K 
Ff. 736-866 : The Preaching of St. Paul in the " Ignorant City " 1 which is Antioch. 
»ju Jo 4! I ,\j>-\ Uj j r VI £*£ tUA£ g r J\ fj~>_ Kju^ J^-j ^:U1 jA y . ^-j.^1 o^. j* cW 

.iS'lLil ^ ^i <UlM <»^JI <ijJI J 
Not found in Mrs. Lewis's edition. 

Begins : re J I py~*_ *^J\ j*^ ibLJl u^-tll I41I ^ *~-l 

Ends : i-l C ~JI *** Vj II jWVI ( ^k j£j u--^ 1 J^Vl y- yj •-**-.? j^ **» 
Ff . 78-79 are supplied by a later hand. 

L 

Ff . 870-976 : The Preaching of St. Matthias in a town the inhabitants of which were cannibals. 

More or less similar to Mrs! Lewis's edition (pp. 109-118). 

Begins : jU ^ jl b. <*- %J~ U^ I^jUtj ^JUI jj* lotf I 1^-51 U jlf" 

Ends : y a>JI <! ^JJI ^-Jl ^-- j-jb-ulj «j-lr. .VI y la>-lj lj)j* ^J 

M 

Ff. 980-1190 : The story of Peter and Paul and of their journey to the city of Rome in the 
time of the Emperor Pergamus (sic), and of the things that happened to Lujft, the daughter of 
the emperor, and of how a bird came and pecked out her eye. 

Differs considerably from Mrs. Lewis's text (pp. 150-164). 

Begins : «~~J! ^_jJ L-»U* jo <jl ^y)\ j^y. o^-^ ./•' '**•. 

Ends : U j^«JI Kjl~J» *j~* J^ <~\ j^>^ ^ •»-** »^f ^ es^ 1 4i •^t J** 1 £~- j* cfo 

1 Has here " ignorant " the sense of " pagan," as in Islamic Arabic the expression " the time of JaHllyah " refers to the 
period which preceded the mission of the Prophet, or is it an attempt to translate literally the Greek word " Antioch " ? 



I2 6 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

N 
Ff . H9«-i30& : The Preaching of the Apostle Andrew. 

No special heading is found in the text, which differs considerably from that published by 
Mrs. Lewis (pp. i-ii). 

Begins : juJI ^ i\j LJ1 o/U &J. lj*U ,JUI Jl Lotil l^> U f l¥l «iUr J 

Ends: y tftfjjj tfl^U 4)1 Jf . f %- ^J ^-^ 0* £> ^ ^ U -> 

O 

Ff. I3i«!-I39& : The Life of St. Marinus. 

.jj-^JLjU UVI »^» 

No special title in the text. 

Begins : ls> W ;l^t <b cOfVJ 1 ^ JU ^>-j jUjJI dlli J jlT 

Ends : UJlj 3mIIj UUIj ^J\ Jj^j VI Uj c~3j u ^ o A (f ^ if 31 ^' ^ ^ r* 8 ^ 

p 

Ff . 140^-1476 : The Life of the holy woman St. Eugenia, and of her father Philip, Patriarch 
of Alexandria. 

.ij.X-Vl &jjm U*UI < _ r JLi \*y\) tfjUl oWj! ;j>Ul L-^SJI U5 

Begins : aU^VI x» ^U* ojj iix. Jc dii. jUjll *iXJS J jo 

Ends : i-l djt^Jl ^r^' Uj.1 »^-» ,*» Uyij lillLi- jl^ liUjI will .A* ;}U. ILL» jlj 



Ff . I48«-I54& : The discourse of John Chrysostom on Penitence and Asceticism. 

Begins : UjJI »i* -^ l^y ji j»JJl jutl^JI li»lj «b**J1 *U-I I 

Ends : -M <— _ji **© kUi «« UdL-j UVjo=JI ^_^ <u«jtflj jlJu-JI U>-_y_ jL$ &*-a^ ^.y^* tfjllj *c.\ii» 

R 

Ff . 155^-1656 : A penitential and parenetic discourse on the last judgment, by St. Ephrem. 

A leaf is missing between ff. 154-155, which contained the beginning of the discourse. 
The name of St. Ephrem is placed at the top of each page. 

Ends : i-l Ja-ij re— J^ -x=»cc .<! U«,L> y>j, U*Vl <uV 



MINGANA COLLECTION 127 

S 
Ff. i66fl-i69a : The story of a man and of his black slave. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : ^J3l _^ill ^ft l^L-j j ^1 jj I4I Jli jjjl ^ fcju j jlT 

T 

Ff. 169^-1720: : The story of an Italian girl of noble birth, taken from the " Dialogues " 
of Cassian, or from his Collationes. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : ^jlljJt a. ; 15" j j^Llf a, ^1 br 

U 

Ff. 172^-1736 : The story of a man who died and was raised from the dead by the help of 
God. 

.^L* 4JJI ****! o~» <J*-j a-^» 
No special heading in the text. 
Begins : jjjl j, f U jldl f ^JI jj aVjIj ;l^l *Jj J>-j oL <il J\ 

V 

Ff. 1736-182^ : The story of Mary, the daughter of a king of the Franks, who was hated 
and consequently had both her hands cut off by her stepmother, but had them restored to her 
by the Virgin. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : a\y\ ^ J,^ ijyjl ^ fou £j\ *y, a jC 

W 

Ff. i82b-iS4a : The story of a man from the city of Rome and of his wife who was much 
devoted to the Virgin. 

,*\jjj\ *£j» ^A vlJb ^1 *S\j\$ <*a3J A*JU ,j- J»-j <-a* 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : ii~>- "»\y\ <1 jfrj Lie. y>.j jlf acaSM <~.jj &ju j 

X 

Ff. i84#-i88fl : The story of a rich man from the city of Rome and of his wife who had inter- 
course with her son. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : ajUmIIj JUI ^ 1^-.^. Lie ^j ojj <i-u J jlf 



I2 8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

Y 

Ff . 1880-1890 : The story of a Christian young man killed by the Jews and raised from the 
dead by the Virgin. ... 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : «aU ju?6~~J5 cio ^ wl j* <~~*j ^j 

Z 

Ff . 1890-1920 : The story of a man and his wife who had a carnal intercourse on Easter day. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : 4)1 # C>U> l*yf USj l\^3 Jr-> o^ 



aa 



Ff . 192&-1940 : The story of a priest and a dying widow. 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : L-lit o^ju-\ oj*. ^U ^ aa^I <>• K»S" 0» 



.aJUjIj ^^ A-ail 



bb 

Ff. 194&-195& : The story of a monk who was the majordomo of a monastery. 

.UjoVl <ja~. o3^- v**' J ^ 

No special heading in the text. 

Begins : jM %y jjk- *J> •A j ^ u*"« ^ ^* ,J ^ 

All the stories found on ff. 1660-195& seem to have been culled from a collection of miracles 
performed by the B.V. Mary. Such collections are found in the Syriac MSS. of my collection, 

Nos. 364 and 458B. 1 

cc 

Ff. 1980-2080 : The letter of Dionysius (the Pseudo-Areopagite) to Timothy, the disciple 
of St. Paul, about the martyrdom of the Apostles Peter and Paul. Read on the 29th of June. 

Begins : WV1 j\jJ\ ^ 4*1 <y &&\ cj-VIj JUjJ! .LUil 

dd 

Ff . 208&-237& : A collection of theological questions dealing with the Trinity and the Unity 
of God^ the mystery of the Incarnation, and with different subjects relating to fasts, dominical 
festivals, some Biblical passages, and various ecclesiastical ordinances. 

1 Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of MSS., vol. i., pp. 661-662 and 814-815. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 129 

The first section begins on fol. 2086 : «^l ^ £r~*^ V"~ r - J *?"^ zJ$\ U;» <>?.. *>fr^ oVI_^ 
The last section begins on fol. 2356 : ^1 jj<Ote~ j* 4-» ^3 ^3 ^J ^^ J 1 45* V^ ^* U^ <>*„ 

ee 
Ff. 2376-245^ : A discourse on the Sacrament of Penitence and Confession, by John 
Chrysostom. ^j, lJjb ^ ^ ^ j^«yi ^, j^ j ^JJI ^ U^ JjJUl ^jdl Jy & j~ 

Begins : 3*?^!! v^=*Jl ju» j-ii-l Jji-i ^ 

The discourse is in rhymed prose. 

ff . 

Ff . 2486-2836 : The history of the. monastery of Mount Sinai, when and why it was built, 
and an account of the sacred places which it contains. 

.i-oSJI ^l»VI 4*j»*3 j^i 4?-V (3-JJt >-■ 11 yU_j _^_jJI ^» jUj ^1 jj j-jl«JI IL- j_^l» 411 <_Ur ->W 

Begins: ^Ull «~»- l^j^ -iSs IL- j^» 4JI J^*- A»-' *»^-* W- 

Incomplete at the end. The final words are * : l**-^ ^^ *J>* £3 r^ ^Ijll ^a c$*~ !..? 

The MS. consists of three different parts, put together by the binder from three different 
MSS. No date. Ff. 1-195 are written in a clear but sloping Syrian Naskhi hand of about A.D. 
1600. The hand used on ff. 198-245 is slightly later, but clearer. Ff. 248-283 are in a thinner 
Syrian Naskhi hand of about 1700, and are damaged by damp. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated, with the exception of ff. 208-245. 

Some leaves are here and there supplied by the binder, and they contain numerous notes by 
readers who are described below according to the order in which they are found in the MS. : — 

(1) Fol. 13a: : Murad, son of Luke Antanios, of Horns (or better Hims), in a.d. 1846. 

(2) Fol. 136 : Ni'mat-Allah, son of the priest Ilyas Salamah, in a.d. 1846. Another 
inscription by him is found on fol. 146. 

(3) Fol. 14a : Ibrahim, son of Wahbah Jacob, in a.d. 1857. 

(4) Fol. 146 : Thomas, son of the priest Basil Shakrah, in a.d. 1881. 

(5) Fol. 196(3: : Michael, son of George, son of the priest Nicholas Atkafi of Horns, in the 
time of the bishop Gregory Jeraslmus, in the year a.d. 1779 and 1193 of the Hijrah. 

(6) Fol. 1970 : Jesse Saba Faddul Sarraf of Horns, on the 1st of June, A.D. 1813, and 15th of 
Jumada II. , 1228 of the Hijrah. 

(7) Fol. 2466 : George, son of the priest Basil of Horns, 1864. 

(8) Fol. 2470 : Faris, son of Salim Luke Michael Antanios, in a.d. 1864. An inscription 
by him is found also on fol. 2476, in which " Michael " is omitted, and " Antanios " is changed 
into " Matanis." 

(9) Fol. 248 : An inscription by an owner Makdasi (i.e. pilgrim) Ilyas Rizk Salamah, who 
bought the MS. in a.d. 1809, and bequeathed it as wakf to the church of the Forty Martyrs. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 876.] 

1 In comparing the text of the present MS. with that of No. 94 [105], we notice that the text of the former breaks off 
at the second line of fol. 48ft of the latter. 

9 



130 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

93. 

218 x 157 mm. 149 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

A volume mostly containing the lives of the Apostles and the pious anecdotes described in 
the preceding MS. An examination of the texts of the two MSS. shows that this MS. No. 93 [84] 
is copied from the MS. No. 92 [876]. 

A 

Ff. 16-106 : The Acts of St. John the Evangelist, attributed to the deacon Prochorus. 
It will be noticed that here, as in Nos. 44 [83M] and 92 [87], it is stated that Prochorus 
was related to St. Stephen Protomartyr. 

B 

Ff. 1 10-146 : The Acts of the Apostle Philip, who preached the Gospel in the town of 
Ifrikiyah. 

C 

Ff . 150-196 : The Acts of the Apostle Bartholomew, who preached the Gospel in the town 
of Alwah. 

D 
Ff . 196-300 : The Acts of Thomas, who preached the Gospel in India. 

E 

Ff. 300-366 : The Acts of St. Matthew, and his preaching the Gospel in the " Town of the 
Priests " (Hierapolis). 

F 

Ff . 366-406 : The Acts of Jude, the brother of our Lord, who preached the Gospel in the town 
of Suriyah and in Jazirah (North Mesopotamia). 

G 

Ff. 406-420: : The Acts and the Preaching of James the Just, called " the carnal brother of 
our Lord," who preached the Gospel in Jerusalem and became its first bishop. 

H 

Ff. 420-446 : The Martyrdom of the above James the Just, which took place on the 23rd 
October. 

I 

Ff . 446-480 : The Martyrdom of St. Mark the Evangelist in the city of Alexandria on the 
25th April. 

J 

Ff . 480-510 : The Martyrdom of St. Luke, which took place on the 18th October. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 131 

K 
Ff. 510-590 : The Preaching of St. Paul in the " Ignorant City," 1 which is Antioch. 

L 

Ff. 606-676 : The Preaching of St. Matthias in a town the inhabitants of which were 
cannibals. 

M 

Ff. 676-820 : The story of Peter and Ermehis {sic), 2 and of their journey to the city 
of Rome in the time of the emperor Pergamus (sic), and of the things that happened to Lujit, 
the daughter of the emperor, and of how a bird came and pecked out her eye. 

N 
Ff. 820-896 : The Preaching of the Apostle Andrew. No special heading in the text. 

O 
Ff. 900-956 : The Life of St. Marinus. No special heading in the text. 

P 

Ff. 960-1006 : The Life of the holy woman St. Eugenia, and of her father Philip, Patriarch 
of Alexandria. 

Q 

Ff. 1010-1046 : The discourse of John Chrysostom on Penitence and Asceticism. 

R 

Fol. 105 : The story of a man who died and was raised from the dead by the help of God. 

No special heading in the text. 

S 

Ff . 1060-1100 : The story of Mary, the daughter of a king of the Franks, who was hated and 
who had both her hands cut off by her stepmother, but had them restored to her by the Virgin. 

No special heading in the text. 

T 

Ff. 1106-1110 : The story of a man from the city of Rome, and of his wife, who was much 
devoted to the Virgin. 

No special heading in the text. 



1 On this term " ignorant " see note in preceding MS. 

2 Note this name " Ermehis " given to Paul. It appears to me to be an echo of Acts xiv. 12, where Paul is called " Hermes " 
by the people of Lystra, but how has " Hermes " become " Hermelus " ? I am not aware that Paul has ever been called by 
this name in any historical work. The name may be graphically the same as the Greek name "Hermolaus," borne by a 
saint martyred in Nicomedia on the 27th July (see The Martiloge in Englysshe, edit. Procter and Dewick, pp. 117 and 254, 
and Bibliotheca Hag. Lat., Vol. I, p. 575), or more probably Hermylus ('EpfiSXos), martyred on January 13th (see Cavalieri, 
Catalogus Cod. Hag. Gr. Bib. Vat., 1899, pp. 65, etc.). The beginning of the Arabic heading is : 



i 3 2 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

U 

Ff. 111&-1130 : The story of a rich man from the city of Rome, and of his wife, who had 
intercourse with her son. 

No special heading in the text. 

V 
Fol. 113& : The story of a young Christian man killed by the Jews and raised from the dead 
by the Virgin. 

No special heading in the text. 

W 
Ff. 1140-115& : The story of a man and his wife who had a carnal intercourse on Easter 
Day. 

No special heading in the text. 

X 

Ff . 115&-1166 : The story of a priest-monk and a dying widow. 
No special heading in the text. 

Y 
Fol. 117a : The story of a monk who was the majordomo of a monastery. 

Z 

Ff. 1180-1240 : An anonymous parenetic discourse dealing with the last Judgment. 
From the preceding MS. (ff . 1550-1656) we know that the author was St. Ephrem. 
No special heading in the text. 

aa 

Ff. 124&-125& : The story of a man and of his black slave. 
No special heading in the text. 

bb 

Ff. 1 260-1276 : The story of an Italian girl of noble birth, taken from the " Dialogues " 
of Cassian, or from his Collationes. 

No special heading in the text. 

The folios that follow are from another MS., and were added by an owner or a binder to the 
original MS., which contained the preceding treatises. 

cc 
Ff . 128-129 : Blank. 

dd 
Ff. 130-1426 : The story of Ahikar, the Vizier of King Sennacherib. 

Begins : <sy^3 Jy\ ^* r&^s" 0»J *-^' ^jW* AJ J oC 

Ends : i-l ^Ciilj a^JI <! $\j UJfj Ujp-^ IoO. .l^J «* " O jo- <j-V j»- ^ jl 



MINGANA COLLECTION 133 

ee 
Ff. 143^-1496 : The story of a king who went to the Valley of Sarandib. 

Begins : \}l Uj 4)1 ^ JLs j^ jUI Ji* dUU jUjll dilS J jK". . . 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1780. Headings in thick 
black characters, and sub-headings in red in the first part of the MS. No rubrications in the 
second part of the MS. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 84.] 



94. 

213 x 160 mm. 51 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. ib-ua : The history of the monastery of Mount Sinai, when and why it was built, and 
an account of the sacred places which it contains. 
Same as No. 92 [876], section ff (ff. 2486-2836) . 

^LVI *Aj*a ^ J, 4»-V j5.il! ^-.11 ^A L> j m j]\ ^ jLj J Jj ,j-jiuJl U^ j^, J^ jU-l ,A* 

Begins, as in No. 92 [876] : .^rUll .~*- l^i^* ji» IL- j_^ J^ jU-l a*^-. U 

Something is missing between ff. 5-6, but the history is continued, with a lacuna, on ff. 
19-51^. This shows that ff. 6-18 have been misplaced by the binder and should have followed 

ff. 19-51- 

.In comparing the text of the present MS. with that of No. 92. we notice that the text 
found in the present MS. on fol. 190 is found in No. 92 on fol. 254a as part of the same history of 
Mount Sinai. 

B 

Ff. 6-1 ia : The end of a parenetic discourse with a special reference to the torments of hell. 
Its beginning is missing, owing to the above lacuna and misplacement of leaves. 

The discourse ends : j£) cJft" U^. *$*)** 0' &J* j* Jlfc&l J^j L^>- wil u^-jl ^y— <JV 

C 
Ff. ub-iSb : The history of St. Catherine. 

The saint, who was from the city of Alexandria, lived under the emperor Maxentius (306-312), 
and was the daughter of his predecessor the emperor Constantius (293-306). 
Incomplete at the end. Something also is missing between ff. n-12. 



134 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

D 

Ff. iga~4ga : As stated above, all these leaves are part of the history of the monastery of 
Mount Sinai, and should have followed fol. 5. 

A leaf has disappeared before fol. 19, and one word of it only appears. 

Something is missing also between ff. 23-24, 31-32, 37-38. 

In comparing the text of the present MS. with that of .No. 92 [87], I noticed a considerable 
number of variants. These variants do not only affect the phraseology of both texts, but extend 
also to whole passages. It seems that the author of No. 94 [ I0 5] took the text of No. 92 [87] as 
his framework, but added to it events that took place later. So on fol. 41a he inserted in the 
text a story dealing with the Arab tribe of the Jibaliyah, some of whose members were the servants 
of the monastery, and expressly mentioned in this connection the year a.d. 1768. This anecdote 
and the year in which it occurred are completely missing in No. 92 [^>7]> fol. 2776. 

E 

Ff . 496-5 1 S : The history of the hidden monastery found in Mount Sinai. 
Headed : jjUl ^j\ J ^JJI t5 &*J1 ^jJI ^ ^j£ 1*1 

Begins : .^J? 0j a\ jU (S &*J\ (J ^J\ ^jJI II* U 

Ends: «>l jytjJl &\\ Jl Aj^s ^J\ A ^ ^JJI Ja*\y^h j)^ J*- A»3 
Dated (fol. 49a) October of the year 7281 of the Creation, and a.d. 1773. 

Notes of reading are found on the last -page of the, MS. The most ancient is by the Greek 

Orthodox Shaikh Michael Abu Murad from Aleppo (y^\ (S )i-\ J^U»* *\y> y\ £~Ji), about a.d. 

1790. Another owner was Ni'mah Kattit (JaiJ <*-i), who gave the MS. to his son 'Isa, about 

whom there is also an inscription dated 26th January, a.d. 1831. This inscription was written 
for him by the priest Hanna (John). 

Clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Fairly broad margins. 

Ff. 11&-18&, which contain the life of St. Catherine, are by another hand. 

.[Mingana Chr. Arab. 105.] 

95. 

142 x 96 mm. 218 leaves. Generally from twelve to fifteen lines to the page. 

A MS. containing lives of saints and some theological treatises. Many leaves in it have been 
misplaced by the binder, who has here and there inserted some blank leaves of tinted paper. 
The ink has begun to fade on many leaves, and the edges of some of them have also disappeared. 
I give below a description of the principal contents. 

A 

Ff. 1-4 are blank. Ff . 50-66 : The Life of the Martyr Antonius (Antony) Kurashi (or, of 
the Arab tribe of Kuraish), who was converted as a consequence of what he perceived in the Mass, 
and who was martyred in the town of Rakkah, in the time of the Caliph Harun al-Rashid. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 135 

Incomplete at the end. See below under C. 

B 

Ff . 7-10 are blank and added by the binder. 

Ff. 11-31 : The Life of St. Jude. j^ j$\ ;^ 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

C 
Fol. 32 has been wrongly inserted here, and seems to belong to the Life of the above Arab 

martyr Antonius (Antony). 

D 

Ff • 35-476 : The Life of the holy woman St. Euphrosyna. It is read on the 25th of September. 

For the beginning see ff . 1950-1966 which should be placed here. Some pages of the story 

are also found on ff. 199-201. 

E 

Ff. 480-576 and 202-204 : The Life of St. Marina (or Mariana). ; 

Begins : f U^VI jlC c/^-jlli <~- I d$3 S'. 1 ;j ^ ^^ V 1 *V ^^ ••** 4 ^^« • • 

F 
Ff. 576-900 : A treatise containing fourteen miracles performed by St. Basil of Caesarea. 

A£p\f ijLJ 4i»U j-b s&\ i/jL-li ^oSlI v^l^ . . . 

The first miracle (ff. 576-620) deals with his brother Peter (jrj* aj-\ J»-l & jyVl u-*JI), 
and the fourteenth and last miracle (ff. 886-900) deals with a Jewish doctor called Joseph 
LJLI1 ^j|J1 wuL-ji Jr 1 cj* -r* G l J' "r^O- This last miracle has also a Greek heading. 

G 

Fol, 90 and ff . 101-1086 : An Arabic Kasidah on the history of the world down to the 

birth and death of our Lord. 

.LJI JI *>y~) e-JI JuJI j_^ fr- JI Ijoll J L^t So-*. 

H 

Ff. 91-92 are blank. . . 

Ff . 930-1006 : A treatise which contains the Christological beliefs of the different Christian 

denominations. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. Something is missmg between ft. 98-99. 



I36 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-HISTORY 

I 
Ff. 108&-117* : The story of the Church of St. Elijah of Asbit. ^^ ^ _^ 

Incomplete at the beginning. Ff . 109-110 are blank. 

J 

Ff . iT 7 a-i20b : Two sermons, the first of which is for the festival of the Circumcision 

.j-jJL-ti J^fJ ^ c/»J >*-> ^ -^ J JlSr • 
The heading is also partly given in Greek. 

K 

Ff . 121-122 are blank. , „ . 

Ff . 126^-172^ : The continuation of the above series of sermons, as follows . 

(1) Fol. 126a : For Mid-Lent. 

(2) Fol. 1320 : For Lent. 

(3) Fol. 1356 : For Palm Sunday. 

(a\ Fol lA^b : For Easter. , ,, ,» x 

5) Fol". 1496 : For the festival of the Annunciation, which falls on the 25th March. 

(6) Fol. 154& : For the Entry of our Lord into the Temple. 

(7) Fol. 1606 : For the Epiphany or Baptism of our Lord. 

(8) Fol. 167& : A parenetic sermon of a general character. 
Ff . 142, 153, and 164-165 are blank. 

L 
Ff 172^-1836 : The History of St. Stephen Protomartyr. 

Begins : jJL-l Ui o^J ^-N fcr- U - J jU3 ^ ° Ujli ^ << °^ 

M 

Ff . 1836-1950 : The History of St. Martianus. w 

,(/ JUj» a! JU J*-_^ row i->'j j-*,*** ^»f- 

Begins : L-> 0^ JuU W^ u -> UJI dy Ji ^*U j 1A * <^ 

N 
Ff. I95a-ig6& : The Life of the holy woman St. Euphrosyna. It is read on the 25th of 
September. , ' _ 

Heading as above under D : J>J j& & Cj.j^* ^ J tJ* ^V 1 ^V 31 ^^ , w 
These two Hves have been misplaced by the binder, and should be placed before fol. 35- 



Fol. 197 is blank. p 

Ff. 2080-2140 : A discourse on the decollation of John the Baptist, by John Chrysostom. 

It is read on the 29th August. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 137 

p 

Fol. 2146 : The beginning of the homily of John Chrysostom on the Birth of John the 
Baptist. 

Ff. 215-218 are blank. 

No date. A fairly clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1550. Some leaves 

seem to have been supplied by a later hand. 

Fol. 4a contains three seals of the library of a literary society of Horns, with the date 1896, 

similar to that found in MS. No. 25 [89]- 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 88.] 

96. 

209 x 155 mm. 235 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 
A collection of lives of saints, as follows : 

A 

Ff. 20-1426 : The life of St. Simeon the Stylite. 

.^Ji-l uijj-JI ^ljjJu-^jVI ^y\J\ jL~- jU ILI jf- 

The life contains also numerous miracles performed by the saint. 
Begins : .**& 5j~- «v* J»-lj S" o*^ C%~^ ^^ W jiS* $ 

Ends : <j JU>UI JLa jl cM* . . . 4» *-e$" *Vjl l ^ u J-« ^-c 5 " ^ ¥" ^ U - jl ^ ^ 

.<>l o5j J* 
It is stated at the end that the text of this life was translated from the original Syriac 
into Greek and then into Arabic. 
Jl Ul^- jtT <iV U\jJ\ Ull & . . . UJI fcjUl .i* ^j ^all ^ r UI jL~- ^usll jf- Jsij 

.o tJ JI Jl 4JU3JI fctft 
B 
Ff. 143^-1500 : The life of the prophet Moses. 
>c jr ^j ^j-Vlj j^> c «U f U J> J cfc iSjr^3 ^ 4» <>> ^r ("J 31 c^ 1 j* -^-> 

Begins : L^ <>jVI ^ <~~>S» J->- J* »,/i J* 4H 0' 

Ends : M oUl Jy-il dl Jy? ^1 ju-JI jJ-l Jl U»U ^ U»^ a., J^ij 

C 
Ff. 1506-1550 : The life of Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist. 



I3 8 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-HISTORY 

Begins : *»L» «J»jN oj» >.} •/* Jr ^ o' 
Ends : ^ U**j U*S" vJ 1 J 1 i* 2 "? ^ oI * ^ 

Ff . I556-i8i« : The history of the Blessed Virgin Mary, by St. Epiphanius, the Presbyter. 
feUl Ifc^ ^ J j^JI ^ ^1 ^ ^ -^ V*» ^ M ;J,J ^ ^ _ _ 

It is said in the text (fol. 156) that many previous authors had written a life of the Virgin, 
such as Jacob the Jew (^1 -y.) and Ephrodisianus the Persian (^jUI ,/jiU^lj). 

On fol. 160 is the following description of our Lord : " His face was beautiful, as the prophet 
David declared ' He was fairer than the children of men," » and so also was his stature. He 
had perfect legs, and red hair which was not very thick, but its curling was natural. The colour ot 
his eyebrows was black, and they were not unduly arched. His eyes were of a dark blue colour 
and their glance expressed joy, like the description of David, his forefather, who was of a red 
colour and characterised by beautiful eyes. In this way He (Christ) was of good appearance. 
His nose was aquiline, his beard red, and the hair of his head luxuriant and long No razor 
had ever come near his head, and no man's hand, except that of his mother at the time of his 
babyhood. His neck was slightly bent, and thus his stature was not very tall, straight and erect. 
His colour was golden-brown, and his face was not round, but, like that of his mother, it was 
slightly inclining to be long." ^ 

Begins : fjtj. Urju- y\ ^ .y*>l i-J- \<rs- ■» O^- 11 Of <J.J? & 1 

Ends : (sic) **. ^ ^ ^ U «& U OWN J.I ^Lr lil ^-ii "jUWl J.cJ <f '^ W-J 

E 
Ff. 1816-1956 : The life of St. Severianus, who was martyred on the 9th September in the 
town of Sebaste, after the martyrdom of its Forty Martyrs. 

Begins : U*-~- &J* A LJ*e Utt j&" -1*^1 o^l tTji^jsj- c r , .^ il lj> ^ 

Ends: j*bJ\ U»-M tf J» c^l £>- U»Vlj Uj JUi J>J ^ #• £-^ ^ «^» ^^ W* 

F 
Ff . 195&-2326 : The life and martyrdom of Thuthayil and his sister Babai, who were 
martyred at Edessa in the time of the bishop Barsamya. Translated by the priest-monk John. 

•H* J juiHI >. ^ ^ **•*? \3MZ"\ O"-^ 1 < ^ 1 < * 1 -^ ^V ^ j-^ UI • sl ^ i: " 1 ^^ 



1 Ps. xlv, 2. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 139 

The martyr called Thuthayil is undoubtedly Sharbail. In the beginning of the story the 
name appears as Thuthayil, while towards the end it appears as Sharbilu (i.e. Sharbail). The 
proper name Pharlsimus of the above Arabic lines stands doubtless for Barsamya. 

The Arabic version corresponds more or less accurately with the Syriac text published by 
Bed] an. 1 

Begins : Xte # Ml iUI ^j jml dO {sic) oryUi> &* & j** ^^ iLJI 4 °* U 

Like the Syriac text, the life is said to have been written by Marinus and Anatolius, and 
deposited by them in the archives of the city of Edessa (fol. 232a) : 

j 3UJI j Uluujlj jtUlj ^ijSJl j ^ k c~fci*3 cr^\ £ crM» M ^ •■*» ^ 

,y uy 'jjlji oU 

Dated Saturday of the week of the Deprivation of Flesh, the 4th of February of the year 
7151 of Adam (a.d. 1643), in the eighth year of the Patriarchate of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch 
Meletius II., by Hajj {sic /) 2 Shajjadah, son of Hajj Ilyas. 
jl«i dbj o-LJI pU.1 ryv JI j.1 ^Us. ^U-l *j Jl v^UI ui. J>Jl wifJJI J-JJI -^ J- f? 

A note of purchase is found on fol. 233a by Michael, son of the priest Antanios (J-*U* 
o-^ilLii ^Jl ^1), who states that he bought the MS. in a.d. 1790 from a man from Aleppo 
who had come to Horns. It is also stated that the MS.' had come originally from Constantinople. 

Notes of reading are found on ff. 234* and 235*- The note on fol. 235 is dated Thursday, 
the 2nd June, of the year a.d. 1670. It is stated in it that the MS. was read in Constantinople 
by Hajj Gregory, son" of Hajj 'Abdallah, son of the priest Mansiir of the Greek Orthodox Church, 
who was originally from Aleppo. ^j-fc/jVI jj-aii ^j^ <>J 4^ ^ f.T-^ 1 &) i^T-j^ £r0 

Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad 
ma^ginS • . [Mingana Chr. Arab. 85.] 

97. 

215 x 157 mm. 151 leaves. Twenty-two lines to the page. 

The important historical work by Sa'id b. Batrik, the Melchite Patriarch, who died in 

A.D. 94O. •<y„J a> . O*. Ju -"' A^* 

1 Acta Mart, et Sand., vol. i., pp. 95- I][ 9- . 

• This word generally refers to a Muslim pilgrim to Mecca. A Christian pilgrim to Jerusalem is called Makdasi. 



140 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

The work is generally known under the title of : j»^-\ Jij 

The first fol., containing some lines of the introduction, is missing, and. the first words of 
the extant text are : j^JI J*l 4) j^JIj cb\e J^ 

The margins on the upper part of the first three leaves are torn away. 

The text begins, on fol. 2a : ^1 ju- JJ\ ^^1 J^JJ . . . jj^dl j* ^^ji *,tf| 

•f 1 *. 1 *=- J (Sf-3 ^b l*i U- UJI jU- J*-., jc 411 jl . v ,.L:Ji J.J* 

The work ends with the Caliphate of the 'Abbasid Caliph Mu'tamid, who was elected in 

Rajab 256 a.h., and so is incomplete at the end, the last extant words being : ^-Ul <ul \^Si 

In the section devoted to the Caliph Mu'tamid is found also a short biographical note of 
the author, Sa'Id b. Batrik, probably added by his continuator Yahya b. Sa'id of Antioch, of 
the eleventh century. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1750. 
Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 50.] 

98. 

204 x 153 mm. 317 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page on ff. 1-158, and fourteen lines to 
the page on ff. 160-317. 

The important theological and historical work of the priest Saliba, son of John of Mosul, 
which was composed in 1643 of the Greeks (a.d. 1332). 

Headed : ,,U ^1 ^11 ilLj ^ ^1 V J\ } ^Vlj V VI . . . JLJI JS3l jJU- j^ *JuJ 

.jJ UJ-tj j U d\ jlkdl ^ yJ Udl ^ ;UJ|j ;^Jt <j ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ 

Before writing his voluminous work as we have it in its present form, the author had com- 
posed a treatise (risalah) which is found in the present MS. on ff. 3*7*1. This risalah is entitled : 

>\Z^\> a J\ :J ' <f *J\ j| ,bjVI.> jU^I <JLj 

TREATISE OF ARGUMENT AND ADMONITION TOWARDS LOVE, WHICH IS THE FRUIT 

OF FAITH AND BELIEF 

This risalah begins (fol. 3 a) : <JA\ J_ jc ^LJI f yvi cjT, and ends (fol. 7a) : ^ 

.(>l <iti>- iljj jjd\ »&y>-j <iU»-l ^U^ 

A short time later, some friends asked the author to amplify and expand this treatise. 
Yielding to their entreaties, he wrote the present work, which embodies also the above first 
treatise, which is in the MS. called Part (sifr) I. 

As it stands in the MS., the work is divided into five sifrs, subdivided into fasts with the 
exception of the first sifr, which is divided into five mukaddamahs. The fifth sifr has a further 
sub-division into seven asls. 



MINGANA COLLECTION I4I 

Sift I : Ff. $a-ja : " The Risdlah of Argument " as above. It is apparently counted in 
the MS. as Mukaddamah I. In it the author mentions among his adversaries Sa'Id b. Batrik, 
and Severius the Bishop of Ushmunain, known as b. Mukaffa'. 

Ff . 7&-12& : Mukad. II. On the reason why the Eastern Church was wrongly called Nestorian. 

£$\ t£JJl y> jaj u^AJI Ij^, jjJL IjjU ^ii".? ij^kJJL SjliJl 1*j ^~- ^.j*" J -<JW1 ioiJl 

,<JI ojlj Ul V3 p»A%. Jj» (Jj'j^ fj» j^J Jtijj. J?o >*.? 5JLULJ&I iljU ifjjJbJ ~-l ( ^J£. 

Ff. I2&-I5a : Mukad. III. On the difference between the traditional and the rational 
beliefs. 

cUJI _^i)l jylill v ys!l c^U- U ^isSj tfjLs-Vlj ^jJidl jU^VI pv. J>M i»j*» J ,0M <,jiJI 

.^Ul^s-VI jU-VIj 
Ff. I5i-i8a : Mukad. IV. Answer to the objection of Jews and others against Christians. 

Ff. i8a-2i« : Mukad. V. On the meaning of Union and Sonship. 

Si/r II : Ff . 2i«-47«. Subdivided into nine /«5/s. 

Fa$l I : Ff. 210-226. On how the East is the best direction. 

.ol*>-l Ljji»\ _j* jy*J\ jl oLrl : . . . 

Fast II : Fol. 23a. On how civilisation began in the East. 

.J^lJI ^ jo UjJI J UJIj ijUJI |ju» jl J . . . 

Fast III : Ff. 236-250. On how language began in the East. 

. Jj£j\ j jlT Uj^ jl oUllj <UVI j* jUI : . . . 

Fas/ IV : Ff. 2$a-26a. On how the first king was in the East. 

.J^aJI ^ jlT Ul ^ill gldl ^j (JUI ^ jL, dUL. Jjt jl jL ^ Jbl yjl ^ g|J| J^JI 

Fa:s/ V : Ff . 260-336. On how science, philosophy and astronomy began in the East. 

.iMVl ^3 r >r^i (Jb £>^-i j. jji ^ ^jLlO) jUjII ^a ^ liiT iuilij U3-I jl jL ^ . . . 

Pas/ VI : Ff . 34^-400. On the fact that the knowledge of God, the promulgation of the 
Law, the priesthood, and the promise of Christ, took place in the East. 

.Jj£j\> jlf" lei gu*Jl oft^llj oy^llj (j-^lill j^fcj * jU-Vlj JW 4)1 a»jm J . . . 

Fas/ VII : Ff . 400-416. On the fact that the Annunciation of, and the belief in, Christ took 
place in the East. 

.Jj^JI J* jlT lei A. jU-Vlj £«-. Jl Pj~>_ ^-> 1 oLiJI Jy4& lju.1 jl Ja jwT . . . 

Fasl VIII : Ff. 42a~4$b. On the evangelisation by the Apostles of different countries of 
the world. 

ol—Vlj jljdJI a U jUtVI J-.JI iU /S J . . . 



142 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

Fasl IX : Ff. 456-470. The Profession of Faith of the Eastern Church, translated from 
Syriac into Arabic. 

S*/r III : Ff . 470-1010. Sub-divided into seven fasls and one jumlah. 
Fasl I : Fol. 470. Introduction to what follows. 

..JS Jl U d^l Jl ^Ul ^1 oi> j .JUi >Ji ^ J^ 1 ^ 
Fas/ II : Ff . 476-486. On the See of Rome and on its Patriarchs, from Peter to the 
Council of Nicea. ^j± j[a ^ JA ^ \ 3J \^ ^jj| tfjlUlj U^j ^f f>J... 

Fasl III : Ff. 486-496. On the Patriarchs of Alexandria, from St. Mark to the Council 
of Nicea. .^Vl j?s **. Cf V-^-^ 1 •$&* $'*$•'• 

Fasl IV : Fol. 50. On the Patriarchs of Antioch, from the Apostolic times to the Council 
of Nicea. xti _* j| ^J\ ^ ^ \jfc ^JJI tflUl JtfjlU Ji ^ 

F0sZ V : Ff. 506-516. On the Bishops of Jerusalem, from James the brother of our Lord, 
to the Council of Nicea. 

.ijjl-. j»-i ,j*~A\ vy*. •**. 1 - JJ ^ <y^ r^ J ^ ***^ -r* <^ * • * 

F0sZ VI : Ff. 516-550. On the pagan emperors, from the birth of Christ to Constantine. 

. jjUaJI dJJl Jl ^1 J r j. I/U a ii! jU3l 5/.UH /s ^ . . . 
F0s/ VII : Ff. 550-580. On the reasons that induced Constantine to assemble the Council 
of Nicea. #uj ^ • ^ ^^lj aiJI g- ^j-V ^JJI ^1 J* ^ . . . 

Fasl VIII, which is called a ;'wj«W : Ff. 586-1010. On the history of the Bishops and 
Kings, and on the happenings that took place in their time in the Christian period that followed 
Constantine. 
.jyUki dJJI ^ ujm jS" ^1 ol> &l~H ojL, JJu. j4.ll JC Uj JjLllj iijlLJl /* ^ . . . 

This part constitutes a true history of the period, with special stress on its ecclesiastical side. 

Sift IV : Ff . 1010-1370. On the different religions, sects, beliefs, and on the number of the 
General Councils. Sub-divided into seven fasls. 

Fasl I : Ff. 1016-1086. On the religion of the Jews, their prophets and kings. 

.jr*- 3 S/& 4yJl.5 >UVlj V34JI *U\ J>'* J . . . 
Fasl II : Ff. 1086-1090. On the Samaritan religion. 

Fasl III : Ff. 1090-1146. On the beliefs prevalent in Western regions among Greeks and 
Romans before the coming of Christ. 

.otf^Jlj fjjl •>% ^ UJLLj a->JI 44A-I J ^^^Jl jjjJt j_^U JJ Aoli-I fljVI f'*^... 



MINGANA COLLECTION 143 

Fasl IV : Ff. 1146-1310. On the heresies and religious opinions in the countries of the 
Greeks and Romans after the coming of Christianity. 

.Fas/ V : Fol. 131. On a narrative of Sa'Id b. Batrlk. 

Fasl VI : Ff. 1316-1346. On the General Councils to the number of twenty-four. 

.\»+£- jLe> <ujl Uo-xc-j **UcJI S"S «... 

Fasl VII : Ff. 1346-1370!. On the reason why the Christians of the East did not need any 
Council. t y ^ j, ^^ ^ ^ jLlJ , ^ ^ v ^jj( _j ( ^ ^ _ _ 

Sz/r V : Ff. 1370-3176. Divided into seven asls (some of which sub-divided into fash 
and Juz's) and a khatimah. 

Asl I. On the history of Apostles and Disciples, to the number of eighteen, and on their 
evangelisation of the different parts of the world. This asl is written twice, once on ff. 1370- 
1516, by the hand that wrote all the previous pages of the MS., and again on ff. 1 600-1816, by 
another contemporary hand. 

Asl II. Contains the most important part of the work, and embraces the history of the 
East Syrian Patriarchs, 1 from the Disciple Mari to the Patriarch Yahb-Alaha III, who died on 
the 13th November, 1629 of the Greeks (a.d. 1318). This asl is written twice, once incompletely, 
on ff. 1516-1586, by the first hand, and again completely on ff. 1816-3176, by the second hand. 

.jX\ jb, jp-iyi Jyull ^f tfjlLi $'> J J.5VI J-dtfl J^-J o> cr*^ 1 >- H 0* ^' bl ^ Vl 

Ff. 3166-3176 contain the series of the twenty-seven Archbishoprics under the jurisdiction of 
the East Syrian Patriarchate. Each of the above Archbishoprics had, according to our author, 
from six to twelve bishops under its jurisdiction. 

The remaining ash mentioned in the heading of this Vth sifr (fol. 137a) and in the index to 
the whole work, as found at the beginning, on ff. 16-36, are missing in the MS. The missing 
parts, according to this index, are the Illrd asl, comprising eight fash ; the I Vth asl, sub- 
divided into four fash ; the Vth asl, subdivided into four fash ; the Vlth asl, subdivided into 
two juz's ; the Vllth asl, subdivided into a mukaddamah, four fash and a khatimah. 

No date. Ff. 1-158 are written in a clear Mesopotamian Naskhi, bordering on Ta'lTk, of 
about 1850, and ff. 160-317 are written in a bolder contemporary Mesopotamian hand. Headings 
in red. Broad margins in the second part of the work. 

Many blank leaves at the end, apparently meant for the missing part of the Vth sifr. Two 
pages belonging to the Ilnd asl are written a second time on the fly-leaves i.-ii. at the beginning. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 19.] 

iThe information given by Cheikho in his Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chrdtiens, p. i3 6 » to the eff ect 
that the history of the Patriarchs is a part of the 2nd sifr, is erroneous. The same may be said of his remarks on the above 
work of the author, Treatise of Argument, which he believes to have been a separate work. 



I44 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.-HISTORY 

99. 

239 x 158 mm. 18 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 
Historical works as follows : — 

A 

Ff . ia-sb : The history of the city of Mardin, and of the surrounding district. 

Headed: y <~r* YA<\ ^jj^ Uj . a wU oLj Udl U*l £> ^ JU 41 0j- ^ 

The chronicle of "events extends from the year 620 to the year 1992 of the Greeks (a.d. 309- 

The history is anonymous, but we may presume that its author nourished in the year 

A.D. l68l. ... ... . ... . , .. 

Ends: ji-xH JM ^ -A- \W «- ^ ^> ^* ojU W l - W jU ^ ^ J • J 

B 
Ff 6a-iSb : Another historical work giving the succession of events that took place in 
Mardin and the surrounding district, and even in the whole of North Mesopotamia, from 900 
to 2050 of the Greeks (a.d. 589-1739)- 

Headed : li^ x • ♦ V» jl V • &- & <J- ^ >• U J^ ^ J * wU »J -^ f* 4 * H*-^ & 
In a note added at the beginning (fol. 6a) by order of the present Syrian Patriarch of Antioch, 
Ignatius Ephrem I., we are informed that the work was compiled by the following writers : 
Zechariah Kaphartuthi, the deacon Simon of Nisibin, Samuel Kaukabi, the priest Musa of Ras 
al-'Ain, and the deacon Nahum Tibyathi, and the monk Isa Harrini. Nothing is known of these 
authors who are also mentioned in the body of the text. 

cr .ii ^udij j^\J\ ^ r ^3 J>fi\ ^ ^ ufc^ ftr** ^ Uj c*// 01 \3-> J 1 *-* 
c ^- ji £4ff\\s}3 <***. &J* ay> o*^ 03^ Ojljtf v 5 " f> >>' <jr? ~*W* J^ 

Two more notes are found on the same page, to the effect that two other MSS. of the same work 
are also found, with different titles. The present text embodies on the margins the variants 

of these two MSS. ^ . <t 

The title and the beginning of the history is : ci& ^3 fJ2\ & ^ & ef 11 O j '-* <->*"• • l 

^ J- -3> J 1 l y-^ V U J ; ^ u* *% ^* # ^ ^ J * * • ' J*^ ^' J J -^ ^ Jy ^ 

^ .y ^ 

Ends : ol V. j ppJttl ^J3 \—t 3 i j j-*N J^> <-^J d^> V 4 ^ «-*T 6*- °^ 

-a 1 3 J- ^ 0**^ tU»JJ 
As stated in the above quotation, the aforesaid authors seem to have inserted in their text 
some facts of an unusual and strange character. 

1 The author says at the beginning that to deduct the Christian era from a given year of the Greeks we must deduct 
331, instead of the usual 311. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 145 

Dated 18th of April, 2246 of the Greeks and a.d. 1935, and written for me by order of the 
Syrian Patriarch Ignatius Ephrem I. 
BjUl. ^Sj3 UV r yy fcJ, mi «- IJtijJl jilyJI Vr* W« aL- jLJ \a ^ ^ ^1 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Broad margins. Modern European paper. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 109.] 



100. 

195 x 144 mm. 181 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

A historical work containing an account of the political events, happenings and wars in 
the Persian provinces of Fars, Khurasan, Mazenderan, in the towns of Hamadan, Kirman and 
Shirwan, and in the countries of Georgia and Daghestan ; of the conflicts between Persia and 
Afghanistan ; and of the conquest of the town of Isfahan by the Afghans. 

Title : o^' w-V 4 *j^ • ^ 

THE MIRROR OF WARNING 

The work was translated from Turkish by Michael, son of George, son of Naufal Tarabulusi 
(of Tripoli), at the instance of the priest Michael, son of David, known as "son of Barrik " of 
Damascus. 

Begins: (sic) #\ ^jr &\ JJU~ ^1 ^V! aJI Jjii *K> . . . ol^JI £0,1 ^\ 4! xJ-l 
OU 1 ^ J* tfjr u *-* J* z*» • • • j^ ^ l Jf 6^ 4 j^ U <ii _>* ^.ijUi rt^l <>y 
JiWI V VI . . . ^ ^W J? *b .UJaiWi U-N tt.juJI ^ 55jd! bill ^ £^UI &jUI v^ >*-> • • • 

The history is very detailed, and embraces only quarter of a century, from 1114 to 1139 

A.H. (A.D. 1702-1726). . . 

The work is divided into 125 chapters of unequal length, of which an index is tound on 

ff. 3#-9&. — — 

This index is followed by an introduction which begins : U*j crjto vbh* j^ b\* .**ojU 

The first and the last two chapters begin a s follows : 
Fol. 120: JU 1 (_rV °^ J1 -^ j V 1 - ^ ^ ,J - J ^ 1 *-^* iil 
Fol. 136 : 0Ui- ^ J 1 ^ 1 cV**" ^ -J Wl J- 8 ** 1 



Fol. 180&: jUJu- J^.1 y-i Jljp-1 jL, .03^3 t£J\> k^\ J^ill 

Fol. 181* : ^ jj-JI ^ij J 1 ^ 1 £>l- -0^^ cr*^ 1 -* i - UI ^ 

10 



146 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

Dated (fol. 1816) Thursday, the 15th July, a.d. 1861, and written by George, son of Peter 
'Aridah, pupil of Constantine, son of the priest David. 

Clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi. Chapter headings in thick black characters and 
subheadings in red. Profusely rubricated. Red rulings. Broad margins. 

On fol. la is the stamp of the library of a literary society at Horns, which bears the date 1896. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab, no.] 

101. 

193 x 131 mm. 59 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 2a-sb : The rite of the initiation into the Order of St. Antony the Great. 

Fol. 4 : Blank. 

B 

Ff. 50-520 '• The life of St. Antony the Great. 

Ff . 2O0-49& are occupied with the account of ten miracles performed by the saint. 

Ff . 496-520 contain the Litany of the saint, with a homily in his honour. 

C 

Ff . 520-586 : The life of St. Archelides. .^jJLAjt jU >. 

D 

The copyist intended to fill up the numerous blank leaves found at the end of the MS. with 
a work on the miracles of the Virgin, but he wrote only the title of the work, and a few lines 
of the text. ^ ^ ^ ^ y _^ j U ^ ^ 

The work is written by a Roman Catholic, presumably a West Syrian x Uniat, as at the end 
of the " rite of the initiation " mention is made of a Plenary Indulgence, and of saving souls 
from the fire of Purgatory. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Mesopotamian Naskhi of about a.d. 1850. 
Headings generally in red. Well rubicated. Thin European paper. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 25.] 

1 Three Garshuni words on fol. 576. 



MINGANA COLLECTION I47 

102. 

197 x 131 mm. 89 leaves. Generally from thirteen to sixteen lines to the page. 
The life of St. George. 

jUfll £. <uVI.> ^rj>- ^jU jjiil -x^Jl Vi\ djL. j& ^J, -uiy t - r ^ J JU 4)1 j^, tfJ£ j , , . 

.£>' *>** A*~~ > 

The life is written in the form of zajaliyat, in the spoken Arabic of North Syria. 
Begins : j^U v ^ J-/lj JU. r/A 

Ends : ^jCdlj JnJl 4-» *>-_/ I jIjJI j ^\ ^ 4s~* ^j JU 

The life is interspersed with a historical narrative, introduced by the words ^Ul Jtf 
followed by the zajaliyat, at the beginning of each of which is the tune to which it is to"be sung. 

For the author of the present life see the following MS. No. 103 [73]. 

No date. Written in a clear and neat Syrian Naskhiof about a.d. 1850. Headings in red. 
Profusely rubricated, with the exception of ff. 40-50 and 70-74, which have no rubrications. 
Broad margins. Ff. 82-89 are blank. . 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 29.] 

103. 

137 x 94 mm. 158 leaves. Ten lines to the page. 

Another life of St. George, mostly in the form of poetical zajaliyat. The historical narrative 
is introduced, as in No. 102 [29], by the words : ^\J\ Jtf 

The life is attributed to a teacher called George Nashuri. The author states .that his work 
is based on the life of the Saint written by Bishop Christodolus of 'Anjfrah. 

{J ->-j>- J»Jl Jy ^ £r^' ^ y u^sr is J ^ ^*$\ c3 Jk r - ' p*"Jl **** J^b <J£& lAi* -r-J* . . . 

The zaj aliy fit and the historical narrative are often similar to those of No. 102 [29]. 
Incomplete at the end. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Syrian Naskhi bordering on Ta'llk. No 
rubrications. Two hands of about a.d. i860. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 736.] . 



104. 

214 x 115 mm. 274 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

A history of the Old Testament, from the Creation to the Maccabees, translated by the 
Jesuit Pierre Fromage, who died in 1740, from the work of the French abbe Royaumont who 
died in 1705. 

Title (ff. za and 13a) : -jlSII j^JI jS- J& 



148 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— HISTORY 

Begins : L*yJi\ aL*J\ j^-I j-J* ^j^UI . . . Jy^ j» #< j . . . ^1 >j*s oij^Jl j_^ cS*^ 45 «***-' 

Ends : jyuJI a I Jl j^JI <1 «~-Jl l*J», tf-Jdl f >-* J- £**. J -^y ^' <_W^ csf ^ ^ ^" ■** 

The work is divided into 174 chapters, of which an index is found on ff . 2&-i2fl. 
Dated 31st May, a.d. 1739, and written by Solomon, son of the priest Sim'an Tammam, 
who states that he copied it from the author's autograph. 

I y+*L* jJj jL*-< .Jill jJ_j ^Ju- jJu&\ JuJl j» Ac <Ji-»Vl cj*ui u cLli»j (_ *yA\ ylixll li> ^J *r 

Clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi. Numbers of chapters in thick black characters, and 
other headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. 

On fol. 2746 is an inscription in which we are told how ink was made. The component 
parts are given as follows : 

Gall-nut — 1 okka, 1 

Myrtle — 1 okka, 

Pomegranate peel — J okka, 

Arabic gum — 1 okka, 

Green vitriol — 1 okka, 

Water — 30 okkas. 

The method of preparing these ingredients is described in the following terms : 

" The gall-nuts are well pounded and mixed with water, and the myrtle and the pome- 
granate peels are added. This mixture is placed in the sun for seven days, and then strained. 
Then the Arabic gum, which has been mixed three days previously with a sufficient quantity 
of water, is added to it. The whole mixture is then placed on fire, and brought to the boiling- 
point, while the powdered green vitriol is stirred slowly into it. The ink is then taken from the 
fire, poured into a glass vase, and exposed to the sun." 

This inscription is dated 1793, and copied by Michael, son of Hanna Khuri, who states that 
he wrote it when he was twelve years old. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 18.] 

105. 

196 x 145 mm. 29 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

A letter written, on the 1st of November, 1887, by Gregory Shahln, Roman Catholic bishop 
of Horns and Hama, to the West Syrian Uniat Patriarch, Ignatius George Shalhat (a,d. 1874- 
1891). 

-MAV *a- JWI frj& \ j dUj> JU- 

1 A measure of weight which varied from country to country. In Syria in our days it weighs about 2j lb. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 149 

The letter was written from Constantinople, where the bishop had been compelled to retire 
by the Patriarch. The letter, which is an important historical document, contains many in- 
teresting points dealing with the ecclesiastical history of the Syrian Churches, their mutual 
bickerings and their intimate relations with the Vatican. It is an autobiography of Bishop 
Shahin, and gives an authentic account of his strained relations with the Patriarch, and with 
some contemporary Armenian, Melchite, Maronite and West Syrian clerics. 

Begins : iXiJl aJ-Ij L y\&-\ aa tii*Ui jc »U . . . 

Ends : ^AAV <L. jWI ^" Ij- J .*%^h <iLM ^^-j (**-' e^J^^S '•*£* ^J ^ <^&s vj»jVI •*-*" 
Dated 16th February, a.d. 1888, and written by the West Syrian deacon Ilyas Khuri Stephen. 

. \AAA -u- -WLS' H J *-iil Wf^ J* rt^ jl^pJI jtLk-l ^gjy-l c/Ul <j-Ldl l^lij l^-lf jl> 

Thin European paper. Clear Mesopotamian Naskhi hand, bordering on Ta'lik. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 12] 

106. 

195 x 145 mm. 32 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

Same as the preceding number, and copied by the same Khuri Stephen. 

The edges of fol. 32 are torn. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 13.] 



XI 
MISCELLANEA 

107. 

277 x 193 mm. 80 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

A comprehensive chronological work with tables, containing the ecclesiastical calendar of 
the Coptic Church, especially in relation to Easter, mostly by Demetrius, Patriarch of Alexandria. 

. . . ju»*Jl «-«i!l J*3J ti <J_j-"Jl i>JtyH.j &ji-lj &*)( JLoSjl ^:ft\ [^] jjj Li j*ti£ yu 

Jj+Jm A_V *Jy.^\ J_^!l Jy+£> <&\y) oliail J**) <-»U- Aajli J J Je £«*ill £^s£ if^XJ, £ J **J ^)* 

.4-1 J. IS" (j-^jj <5jL» i.J> «iili> Jcj <L~*-i)l Ja^ll 

Begins : j . . . <Lm~* Jl «UJI J *J}te-l H* UiUj j jlT U <ilj . . » -0-^» j&».j 4" J^j** ■*■» W 
^.uc U a) /il jl Jl jUli . . . &. ,J* ^ <y J~>, & ^*-l U» . . . ju>cJ1 jwmII <-> ^ t^ill cSji\ 

,y jUji ii* lii u^j;i ^1 .IjVI «J» j 

The book is divided into different sections, as follows : The first section (ff. 30-50) deals 
with the date of the Jewish Passover. In it there is a quotation from the book entitled Idhah 
of Severus, bishop of Ashmunain, or better Ushmunain, who flourished at the end of the tenth 



I50 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

Christian century (Jj^/JI jvi^VI US»\ tfjj\» V 1 ^ • • • V^ cH 1 ■*"** J C^ 1 ^ ^ 

The second section (ff . 50-90) contains the passages of the Gospel dealing with the Passover, 
and a commentary on them by the above Severus, Epiphanius of Cyprus, and John Chrysostom. 

^jul!., fJ £JI Ji\> crjjUUj u-otjU Ul ILl jwoiSI AVI ^Urj er^JI jJyi <y ^ UJj . . . 

,w»JJI ^ U^ r ^VI 

On fol. 66 is a quotation from Abul'Faraj b. Tayib (^JaJl j.1 £/II j.1 J^ ^0* 
In the third section (ff. 90-130) are quotations from early ecclesiastical synods and apocryphal 
works on the same subject. 

,\xJ\ aUVi J>}} (>• V>y)\ cJjJIy^j %J^J &-* <--^ JI ^' u* ^^ • • • 

In it are quoted : 

(1) The Didascalia (Ui-oil). 

(2) The Canons of the Apostles (£>y*j)l j> ^ J*>J\ UU (sic) UyL- ^jjl jUIj jolydl ^ 

.(cA-Jladl oUjJl t5 *— - 3 • 

(3) An apocryphal Letter of St. Peter, on the observance of ecclesiastical festivals pILj $ 

.(^LcVI jum j .LoM (j\) cfj*. 

(4) A work entitled : Introduction to the Holy Passover (woJI <^-aJ\ JUai. v^"o* -r* 3 * £>*f) 

(5) The Canons of Hippolytus of Rome (^ j*T ^ J»-l & . . . <^.jj U c/oJ^.I <^iiy t>» • • 

(6) The Canons of St. Basil. 

The fourth section (ff. 130-22&) contains long extracts dealing with the same subject, from 
the still unedited historical work of the Coptic writer, George b. 'Amid, who died in a.d. 1273 

.(juJt # ^j*. . . . JiUJI oMl >\jr Aj>- f> J' J H <y i*M jM*l ol5) 

The fifth section (ff. 230-31 6) contains a treatise on chronology, with tables for the finding of 
Easter and other ecclesiastical festivals and commemorations, by Demetrius, called in the 
MS. " Patriarch of the great city of Alexandria, of the Abyssinians, Nubians, Africa, and of the 
five towns of Gharb." x See below. 

LiJ-lj ijJoC-Vl c$ ^aJi <i_jJI 6jjm ifyj** Ul -jCJl yVI U-l Uj ^JJl 4jLJ1 (jk*Vi yL»- • • • 
jus^JI «-«mJIj ^^Ji Juc-j (j-jiJI -^-ali r'^p-^ ibt* uit*** y»j *4„;«N j*** cJ~**"^ ^LA""-* ***u*^ ^*».y^b 

Something is missing between ff. 25-26. 

The sixth section (ff . 320-346) contains a synodical letter, written by the West Syrian bishop 
of Jerusalem to the West Syrian community of Egypt, in the year 1312 of the Martyrs 2 (a.d. 1596). 

1 Extracts from the above treatise on chronology by Demetrius, Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria, are registered in Graf, 
Catalogue de Manuscrits, pp. 131 (No. 347 : 13) and 172 (No. 346 : 7). 

2 The year is written in Coptic numerals. 



MINGANA COLLECTION l5I 

This letter was written two years before the MS. was copied (see colophon below), and deals with 
Easter, Lent, and the Fasts of Wednesday and Friday. 

The seventh section (ff. 350-436), from which a leaf is missing at the beginning, deals with 
the same subject of Easter. All this section is misplaced, and should have been at the be- 
ginning of the work. A late owner copied these leaves afresh, and placed them at the beginning, 
on ff. 1-5 of the MS. as it stands. For their contents see above. Further, ff. 26-31 should 
have immediately preceded the chronological tables on ff. 446-800, of which they contain an 
explanation. 

Ff. 446-800 contain the extensive chronological tables which are the sequel to the treatise 
on chronology spoken of above in the fifth section (ff. 230-316) by Demetrius, the Patriarch of 
Alexandria. The tables are complete, and contain the Epacts and the days of the week and of 
the month on which fall the Dominical Festivals. The names of the months are those of the 
Coptic months, and are written in Arabic characters, but the numerals are written in Coptic. 

On fol. 316 the MS. is dated Friday, 3rd of the month of Tubah, of the year 1315 of the 
Martyrs (written in Coptic numerals), and the 10th Jumada ii. of the year 1007 °f the Hijrah 
(a.d. 1598). The name of the copyist is given as the deacon Samuel. 

dUi jiijJi . . . jWJ»vi ijifiiJ A.LJ \r\o &« 4ji» j& vji: ijjL.11 i*Xy -^ diu ^, *\j\ jS? 

.i-l jj-L-ill J»_^*-» iU-fr l^*>- Jx-\ <-»j I . . . <— *)VI ju «*-< Xi- j>^\ (£*\»* j+z> _^U 

Clear, bold and handsome Egyptian Naskhi hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Some chronological jottings by a later hand on fol. 806. 

On ff. 10 and 16 are two astronomical maps, dealing with the Mansions of the Moon. The 
first one is headed : IfJl&lj l^ljlj Ul_j») *)ji» CJ-s^* <JUdl rj- 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 11.] 



108. 

152 x 101 mm. 85 leaves. Generally fifteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 1-86 : A treatise on the solar and lunar calendars. 
Headed : £-1 \j*&\ ttJl jl JU" 4)1 4&3 JW .^-all jj**J\ *#yi Jc J^\ i>^-> J yl 

B 

Ff. 90-100 : A table followed by a short treatise which shows which day of a Syrian month 
is the day of the new moon. 

Headed : ^3)^ j+^\ J j*$\ jJ^i *y Ji *3j~ J iO. 



I52 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. -MISCELLANEA 

C 
Ff 106-846 : An extensive ecclesiastical calendar which shows the dates on which Easter 
falls and the days of the week on which are celebrated the festivals and commemorations which 
follow it, together with the indication of all the New Testament lessons which are to be recited 

011 ^IUsSed at the beginning and in the body of the text that the ecclesiastical calendar begins 
afresh after the end of every cycle of 532 years. 

The title of the work is : 

J$Lf}\ J& 

THE BOOK OF THE CYCLE 
Headed : ^ V \^ 3 J/yi Jl *y.j Z* #*j CJ&3 *>-*■ & ^^ J1 J **" ^ <jf$ S ^ 

The work is more or less in the form of tables. Each series of these tables has a heading cor- 
responding with the date of Easter, which extends from the 22nd March to the 25th April. This 
is made clear on fol. 216 as follows : YY ^ <I**»J ^ >r~ **" 0®3 ct-^ -»* <f* <*' j^i^ 

.jLJ Yo J' jW 

A diagram on fol. 12a is attributed to the priest George Kumin in the following terms : 
IL-J-I aJT^JI j>, j* ^ j>3 m *JM\ J* CJj J.jr ^ V*f err* ^ jg& ® c^ ^ 

The A section of the MS. on ff. 1-86 is dated (fol. 86) middle of September of the year 7150 
of Adam (a.d. 1642). 

<( o1 ILV dj—*»J «»>J Sil\ V **" J ^ 0* J -^ tA-^ -^ J ^ , - jl <** Jjp ~ 

The B section on ff. 9-10 is by a modern hand, and the C section on ff. 106-846 seems to be 
by two hands, the older of which is of about A.D. 1770. 

Clear and handsome Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Rulings 

in different colours. 

On fol. 856 is a table giving the Coptic numerals with their corresponding Arabic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab, in.] 

109. 

A roll of thick paper, 1245 X 107 mm. 

A complete calendar with chronological tables. 

The calendar is in the form of diagrams and tables. 

A 

The first table is a square diagram which contains all the seasons and months of the year 
in relation to the twelve Signs of the Zodiac. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 153 

B 

The second table contains an ingenious method for finding the beginning of the years and 
months of the Arab or Islamic calendar. 

It is followed by another table in which the days of the week may also be known in that 
calendar. 

C 

A diagram and a table, which follow exactly the same method, for finding the beginning of 
the years and the months and the days of the week in the Syrian or Christian calendar. 

D 

All the remaining tables, covering more than two-thirds of the roll, contain an ecclesiastical 
calendar for the numerous Dominical festivals and commemorations of saints, together with the 
stars that are visible in the days on which these commemorations fall, and other details dealing 
with some events that may affect the earth. 

Dated, at the end of the roll, end of Muharram of the year 1272 a.h. (a.d. 1856), and written 
by 'Abd al-Fattah, son of Muhammad 'Atai. 
JU\ &jm\ J- JuJI JJ*~ ^m»\ ju* xJi #\ JUi\ c bill x* JuJl ^ill -V J 1 j^' fi 4 r r * 

.s^Jllj j£>)*3 jv-^j JvttVI 5L- j^. j* y ^Dl f ljA-l r y= ^ >-l ^ <iUi> 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Tables generally in black and red numbers. Profusely rubricated. 

Red rulings. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 108.] 

110. 

167 x 109 mm. (oblong). 102 leaves. Varying number of lines to the page. 
The diary of the East Syrian priest Khidr, son of Ilyas of Mosul, who was born in November, 
a.d. 1679, and who joined the Roman Catholic Church, and went to Rome, where he died in about 

1755- 

The diary is important, and throws light on many points dealing with Christianity in North 

Mesopotamia at the end of the seventeenth and at the beginning of the eighteenth century. 

I will refer below to the principal items which it contains. 

The diary contains both Syriac and Arabic pieces. 

Ff . 1-7 : Various pieces in Syriac and Arabic. The Arabic pieces are mostly in poetry, 
and are literary in character. The Syriac pieces are one teshbohta and one karuzutha. 

Ff. 8a-2ia : Miscellaneous literary pieces in Arabic, composed by the author. The piece 
on ff . 8b-ga is a madihah on the Rosary, written by the author in Aleppo, and dated 23rd March, 
a.d. 1725 and 2036 of the Greeks : WYo &- ^J»- <*->* J jl-U&l i J^^ j-^- ^j** j?&\ -^» <iX* 
<J v, jlcj £ir j\»\ j+J* J <j$x Y*V*\ «"- <-** — • . The madihahs to the Virgin on ff. 13 and 14 



I54 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

are to the tunes of ruhdwi and nawa respectively. Ff. 15-21 contain lexicographical notes, 
mostly Syriac words translated into Arabic. 

Ff 22-27 contain various hymns composed by the author. 

Ff 27-48 contain the very interesting diary of the author's journey from Mosul to Rome 
in a d 1724 1 in which he gives the account of his journey, with the towns through which he 
passes, and describes the Jubilee year in Rome in 1725, and his dealings with the Roman Catholic 
authorities and with many Eastern bishops who were then in Rome. 

On ff. 27-28 the author gives us the following important notes about the death of the 
Nestorian Patriarch Elijah Marogin 2 which occurred in December, a.d. 1722, and the succession 
of his nephew Elijah Dinha, who was enthroned at Christmas of the same year. He mentions 
also that in September, a.d. 1723, Joseph, the Chaldean Patriarch (evidently Joseph III), who 
was at Amed, sent Bishop Basil to the above Elijah to endeavour to convert him to Roman 
Catholicism. The author further narrates various conversations which he had with the same 
Elijah but having decided to join the Roman Catholic Church, he was obliged to flee from Mosul 
in August, 1724. After having reached Aleppo, he received the news of the death of the Nestorian 
priest Shim'un (Simon), who had been the cause of much of the trouble that had befallen him. 
Finally, he gives the list of the books which he had to leave behind, and the names of fifty-four 
students whom he had at his school in Mosul. The last year mentioned in his diary while in 
Rome is the 16th July, a.d. 1734. 

jy^^ J ; > uil 4>. ui ji. _>cjji ^j^JJi ii>. J)s ^ v 15 * #*•"* Mj #" **" ii 
•»-. J J^ \} ^r J c y-:^ &* j.* j ^ &* Zj f^ iLJ1 •■*• & ^ *? ^ ^' ***** 

^ ^ yb_, 4S. iy\> jo^i ^ <~r- ^ ij-* ^ ^y 11 l J J 1 ^-> ^^ ^ «j •> LJl '^ 

jt JLm -u-J jJ£- ^ J» juIjJS3I i)>, U-31 jl* j* y*& <« ul>i *il l>*^ ^J J-j^ <y V->* 
;^5 fc^- <i> o*.lj 4,Jb.j wJ J-^Jl 4 jJW ju .^JL- jl WjIj >**• a-* , /~*-> ^ ^W* 31 "^ J 6 
UU> jJ jl L& o v ^ j^ <*J1 <j Oj»J y>£ V J-jIj qrJ>-N ^ 4>J ^^ ^ ^ & 

Y^yo <^=-^ \VYi <^ v 1 -^ «j ^.^* «J^ V^ ^: 5 -''^' , ^ °--> i - J J-»^' A ^ **J& J? ** J • 
ojU ^JJI ^jjWJJI j_^ ^J oU jl J^ jJL ^ ^i-l UU-j ji lUj ^-1 t- UC- ^jU Ui- oli_y_ 

^L-l ^V^*.? UlJ_y_ Y«V*V A-^^ \VYO &- >U _^ J- ^_y_ J^l j ^ jL,^ . . . .A Jc Ml »OA 

.i-1 J^^JI ^ U5y Ji\ ^SW 

1 Not in a.d. 1719, as stated by Cheikho, Catalogue des Manuscrits des Auteurs Arabes Chretiens, p. 94. 

2 The name is composed of Mar and Gin, Gin being a corruption of Augin = Eugenius. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 155 

On ff. 48^-49^ the author gives the epitaphs of the East Syrian Patriarchs who are buried 
in the monastery of Rabban Hormizd, near the village of Alkosh, with the years of their Patri- 
archate. The first Patriarch mentioned is Elijah, 1 who died in May in the year 1902 of the 
Greeks (a.d. 1591), after a Patriarchate of fifteen years. 

The second is another Elijah, who died in May of the year 1928 (a.d. 1617), after a Patri- 
archate of twenty-six years. 

k* J.^o>;aa^ ^>*o (JS^cx, ^^-caAo J^ULbolo )j^a*jJ.o )^» Aula ^.J w-^s jJ^ .)-u;i 

The third is Elijah Shim'un (Simon), who died in June, 1971 of the Greeks (a.d. 1660), after 
a Patriarchate of forty-three years. 

The fourth is Elijah John, who died on Friday before Pentecost, the nth May, of the year 
2011 of the Greeks (a.d. 1700), after a Patriarchate of forty years. 

.^jul* ^i^a}/ J-^»;oaL\ v^jo yoA J...// Kia oi-s )-. *-/ ^\^s> 

The fifth is Elijah Marogin, who died on the 14th December of the year 2034 of the Greeks 
(a.d. 1723), after a Patriarchate of twenty-three years. 

yoL*^ yOLXa ^X^oau ia^Ks*} J.*£^ yoi ^o J-^» ^.po v^jl&o j-«^ .*_*^ppo ,)^. t .> v> .. 

The sixth is Elijah Dinha. 

No year of death is recorded, because, as seen above, he was still alive when the author wrote. 
The number of the series of these Patriarchs given by Lamy (Barhebrseus, Chron. Eccles. ill., 
570) does not seem to be accurate. He places an Elijah XI between Elijah Marogin and Elijah 
Dinha, whom he calls Elijah John. Our author, in this list and in a previous statement, asserts 
that Elijah Dinha immediately succeeded Elijah Marogin. In the Catalogue of the Syriac 
Manuscripts of my collection (p. 1195), I followed Lamy in placing an Elijah between Elijah 
Marogin and Elijah Dinha, whom I numbered as Elijah VIII, instead of the erroneous XI given 
by Lamy. Elijah Dinha is called by Lamy Elijah XII, but this number is certainly erroneous, 
as Elijah 'Abbu' 1-Yaunan, the Chaldean Patriarch of Mosul,' who was elected about 160 years 
later, is Elijah XII. 



His profession of Faith is placed at the beginning of this epitaph. 



156 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

On fol. 480: the author writes that in the year 2030 of the Greeks (a.d. 1719) MTrawis (sic) 
came and took the town of Isfahan, and Sultan Ahmad of Constantinople 1 sent many generals 
to Persia, fought the Russians and took from them many towns, especially Tiflis, Karmanshah, 
Hamadan, Tabriz and Erivan. 

Ff . 50b- j8a contain short compositions of an ethical and spiritual character, in Syriac, Arabic 
and Garshuni. I will mention those of them that are dated : 

On ff. 54&-55& is a madrash written at the death of the deacon Musa (Moses) of Baghdad, 
which took place in Bandar-' Abbas in July, 2032 of the Greeks (a.d. 1721). 

&- jyj- j+z> j ur\f- j-u j jy ^aJl ^aUiJl ^y j-L- J»-V Ail I -w j-xi- i j~J&\ J_^ j» jrU-^ 

.AJlJ_y_ jvT^Tj JM»*ij jull 

On fol. 56a is another madrash written in Rome in a.d. 1726, at the death of his pupil and 
cousin the deacon John, son of the priest Ilyas, who died on the 22nd May, a.d. 1725. 

aaaj Kia yoA j^/ Kaa jLJ j+z> : a*L<, ji_j <*■*** \VYo aL. jll ^ ^ YY j j/ <3-^' 

On ff . 65&-68a is a consolatory piece translated by the author from Syriac into Arabic in 2033 
of the Greeks (a.d. 1722). 

On fol. 786 is an interesting account of how the Pope Clement XI sent to Mosul, in a.d. 1719, 
the Maronite priest Andrew Iskahdar, for the purpose of buying Syriac and Arabic MSS., and 
of how he was unsuccessful until helped by the author, who was then a schoolmaster, and who hid 
him in his house and procured for him the necessary MSS. This Iskandar is the man who, more 
than any other after Assemani, enriched the Vatican Library with Christian MSS. of all kinds. 

**■** J 1 JaAJI j-uC-I <j-.jlj.xil u - y J U- JjVI jylf jfr : )K. .. ,iv ^o^/ aju : jlf U 
Ai> j» ^ ^jll} <Ujl jlT ^JJI ^ o-jku^l jU JUjJI IUI Jj ^ y^ ^yj ^ ^1 J^^JI 
*^ J ^* J' *~*J- is-^J »OftL- .jjAjJyUl j. o»-l jjA ^ J-*jJI j ^U a1* Ui ;^UI -* £jJJ! joljJlSDl 
IUI «JJ* ^ ^U Ul jop- ^J j^i-l I Jl5j •^ .^Ij AiU- J-jli J_jCVI s_^>-L» jj-jjJI ja*. Jl Jc 
j-v>- ^J aJ JUi jj-UJl _uc .U- iiA5^ J_>C-I ^L. dli^" A>«LaJI i* J ^^i J^c, j^l jj^, L> ^iT^ ;&'l 
^-U^ a^^U-^ y Cj Jl joi. ^ oli-l ^ o,y U ^J dU lS £\ IUI U/" Je-V pvJtj .j-IJI jc a.I/j U. 
jl^S* c* ^ jj»^„J ••^ j* dy.j^-J djf\, 'jj^j c* 1 ^"-^: -^^ **- J j4-V'j JjjUI ^yJii-l ly- JiUi^i 
aJI^JI^ aJI^3I^ a.^1! ^ # j&\ U jT a! ^^.1 U Jl ^.uc ^ ^ oyrA ^ t*** ^ Jlj** 
ja ^.-1 jl JUj o5 ^^i^-ijl IUI jl ^1 I joi- ^j! t/jljjil ^j JUi J^^JI ^ ^il ^Ijl Uj 

ile ^ ^jf '-J* -^-^ Oj-fcl -w iilj .j-jiJl **^JI jlrVI jUil Lji, J IjJLl) ^Jj ;^LJI ^Vjl 

•^j fi^' (J** cs** vj'j y cs^"" -h,j' v*^ 4^ 

1 Evidentl)' Ahmad III. (1703-30). 



MINGANA COLLECTION 157 

Ff. ygb-8yb contain madrdshs on the dead, in Syriac and Arabic. The madrashs on ff. 806, 
82b and 836 were written by the Chaldean Patriarch, Joseph II, who died in a.d. 1714. The 
last madrdsh was written by this Patriarch for his father. 

Ff. 8gb-g^a contain the rules of the Maronite monks, which are those of St. Antony. 

Ff. 95^-97^ contain an acrostic elegy on the sorrow of the Virgin at her separation from her 
Son, by Stephen, a Maronite priest-monk living in Rome. 

JjjU ^>ij ,-^C jU.L-1 ^vi IfiJi . . . ^^ 0I4UI <J$i ^ f*-yj j_>- j^> £~- Ji -Vi j <tj» 

The remaining folios of the MS. are occupied with some prayers and scribblings by the author 
in Arabic and in Italian. 

The Arabic part is written in a clear and sometimes minute Mesopotamian Naskhi, and 
the Syriac part in clear East Syrian characters. Some pages in the last part of the MS. are 
rubricated, but the majority of the folios have no rubrications of any kind. The author fre- 
quently changes the direction of his writing, some of it being from the beginning towards the 
end, and some of it from the end towards the beginning of the book. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 72.] 

111. 

I 35 x 95 mm - 6 leaves. Ten lines to the page. 

The letter (in God's handwriting !) that came down from Heaven in the year 1040 of the 
Greeks (a.d. 737) in favour of the observance of Sunday. Incomplete at the end. 

.411 m#1 \y£j* 4~«jJl »Jjt.J i-jiJl <— i£ll l\J VI 4AJU JA^ Jk>-V J^ Vj Jtf»Vl f£ 4~->.J . . . 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi of about a.d. 1760. Heading in red. Well 
rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 76.] 

112. 

165 x 115 mm. 68 leaves. Generally from fifteen to seventeen lines to the page. 
Poetical pieces in the form of modern zajaUydt, mostly in honour of the Virgin and St. 
George. 

The tune to which a zajaliyah is to be sung is placed at the beginning of many pieces. 
The authors whose names are mentioned are the following : l 

(a) Michael 'Abdallah, $\xf JJU** (fol. 9ft). 

(b) Priest Sulaiman, jUL. Lr *Jti\ (fol. 11a ; this name occurs frequently). 

1 The names of some poets occur more than once. 



158 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

(c) John Samm, ju-JI U>-_y_ (fol. 28a). 

(d) Michael, son of Hanna (John) Zalali, JVjJI Up- #1 J^Uw (fol. 30a). 
(0) 'Isa Hazar, who died about 1660, jlj^JI ^—c (fol. 34ft). 

(/) The priest Musa (Moses), teacher in the monastery of Ras-Aktas, j-15! ^/IJI ^ JL. ^^ Ul 
(fol. 356). 

(g) Sa'ud Kafif Rasi, 1 ^U$3l *j»* or c5 -IJI *y»* (fol. 38a). 

(A) Ghazzi, 2 ^jdi (fol. 39a:). 

(*) Salibi, cS JUI (fol. 456). 

Some of the above pieces are acrostic. 

There is no regular beginning to the work, and the first madlhah begins : ;juil &u . . . 

Dated (fol. 68a) May, six days before the Ascension, a.d. 1781, and written near Tarabulus 
(Tripoli), by Sim'an, son of Musa. 

\j <y ^* f^^ 1 t>.' &*r f^^ 1 ^ 6^*- j&-\ jf& juJI -u JjLJl ^liS"" ^ jUill jSj 

. f yJI Uc ^^J! ^va\ aL. . . . *yj\ ^ JJ f U c- jU ^i j . . . f UI a JLl> jJuU ^ [?] feil 

Written in a slightly negligent Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red, and in the first half of 
the book the lines alternate green or black. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 43'.] 

113. 

166 x 121 mm. 69 leaves. Generally twelve or thirteen lines to the page. 
Various zajallyat, madlhahs and prayers, to Christ, the Virgin, and some saints. 
The most important are the following : 
Ff. i-i6a : A zajaliyah to our Lord, by Abu Sa'd. 

Ff. x6b-2jb : A zajaliyah to Joseph, son of Jacob. 

. 1 ij^ri vi I ■_ a-ij. K>Sa ... 

Ff. 280-420 : Miscellaneous prayers before and after the Communion, and to the Virgin, etc. 
The prayers on ff . 556 and 576 are attributed to Fadl-Allah Abyari. 

The prayers on ff. tyb-tya are headed " madihah to be recited when drinking wine." 

No date. Written in a cramped but clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1820. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 75.] 



1 This addition of Rasi to his name is found on fol. 65a. 

* Probably Sulaiman Hasan, the Melchite bishop of Gaza, who flourished in the fourteenth century. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 159 

114. 

125 x 84 mm. 46 leaves. Generally from eleven to thirteen lines to the page. 
On the title-page the book is called : " Indications from the Psalms." 

The subscription is : ^l>Jl JV^ J^f j* 

The MS. contains directions how to make talismans from every Psalm, and indicates the 
magical effects that each Psalm produces. The text is often interspersed with magical letters, 
which are necessary to produce the desired effect. 

I will give below the magical effects produced by the first and second Psalms : 

Psalm I : " They transcribe it as far as the words his leaf shall not fall, and they hang it 
on a woman who has a miscarriage, and she will have no more miscarriages ; it is hung also on 
a mare, and it will become pregnant ; it is hung also on a tree, and its fruits will not fall ; it 
is hung also on a girl who is late in marrying, and she will marry quickly ; if it is laid on water 
which waters the plants when planted, they will grow well, by the permission of God." 

Psalm II : " If a man reads it every day before leaving his home, he will have greatness, 
majesty and honour, and he will be safe from robbers. It is also transcribed and hung on the 
head, against hemicrania. It is transcribed also on an apple, for a child who is weaned, together 
with the following letters, to the number of seventeen. [Here follow the forms of 17 magical 
letters.] " 

The last Psalm treated in the above magical way is 145. 

No date. Written in a clear Syrian Naskhi of about 1820. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 36.] 

115. 

215 x 157 mm. 210 leaves. Generally twenty or twenty-one lines to the page. 

An extensive work on the Figures of Rhetoric, by an author who does not mention his 
name, but who was the pupil of the Maronite writer, Ya'kub b. Ni'mat-Allah b. a. Ghaith abu 
Mawahib Dibsi, who flourished at the end of the seventeenth century, and who was one of the 
teachers of the famous grammarian Jibra'il (Gabriel) Farhat. 

Title : V ^VI ^ J v jVI y. 

Begins : J ~jJI fclL* J& ^JJI c**V1 J* 'jC Ui j*>j . . . jUI •cJc? jLiVI cJk~ j* t p*iil 

J v jVI y- o—.> . . . J-VI ir-UjLMj jVUlj d*yl\ &A>\ JsjU\ t f~J\ jj-jII a^I *» o>) 4*1 

The work is divided into two bdbs, which begin (fol. ja) : ot-UJ-l e\y\ ^ »U- Lj JjVI ^.Ul 
J^lj j^lyJI iij.1 ^ J-^dl , and (fol. 37a) : >_*>-j dl^lj J-ddl gjdl £Jy1 j* >V ^ JtJ! V U1 

The author gives examples for his different kinds of " badi' " from the best Arab authors. 



160 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

No date. Written in a clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1790. Main 

headings in thick black or green characters, and sub-headings in red. Fairly broad margins. 

An index to the work is found on ff. 26-46. On fol 20 is an inscription by an owner Ilyas, 

son of George Hazar (jlj* xJ s rJr Cf. if^)* dated I 5 th of November, 1832. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 69.] 



116. 

238 x 174 mm. 119 leaves. Generally eighteen lines to the page. 

A 
Ff. 10-530 : An epistolary manual, containing models of letters to all classes of people. 

As the first leaf is missing, there is no special title to the work. On fol. 56 a new section 
begins, with the following title : o^t^JI ^iUj obO ^i.>) ^ oliil fj** . This section con- 
tains letters to patriarchs, bishops, priests, and some other personages. 

.i^Dl ►L-jjj <SjO :*U! Jl JurO ^ 

A third section begins on fol. 29a, and ends on fol. 53a. It contains, in a flowery style, 
forty-one latifahs that may be used in a letter. 

The margins of ff . 460-526 are crammed with models of letters. 

Dated (fol. 53a) Wednesday, of the second week after Easter, the 16th of April, a.d. 1819, 

and written by the priest Simawun : ^j^-I «^». ^uH\ ■*•» *JWl <*•*-' ^.jVI jW $*■«*) I »A* ci -w 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. 

B 

Ff. 536-560 : The letter of St. Basil of Caesarea to Julian the Apostate, who had written to 
his lieutenant in Cappadocia to incarcerate the Saint. 

. . . ^JJI jJUJl ^Ul j-yUj, jJIUI Jl 4j»li3l «U ^Jj j«&\ o-jJLA iM-oall ^ JjJLl aJUj 

Same hand as above. 

C 

Ff. 566-570 are filled in, by a later hand, with poetical pieces to illustrate the epistolary 
style. 

D 

Between ff. 580-590 many leaves have been torn from the MS. Fol. 58 contains part of the 
narrative of the massacre of the monks of Mount Sinai, spoken of below, and fol. 590 contains 
the final words of a controversial treatise. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 161 

E 

Ff. 59&-95# : The account of the massacre of the monks of Mount Sinai, given by St. Nilus, 
the solitary monk from the town of Ancyra, who died about a.d. 430, together with the account 
of the capture of his son Theodolus. 

.Ail Cf^S^i^ j^\ <A-»J »^xil Aiju» /jA ^JJl Jo-^lJl .^l^ll ~IJ jj-J.J^I « i.Jlr IL- Jy^y i jL/b^Sl J3 -r- jZ> 

Begins : jljU Jl o*>- l^lr J^-i ^.^Jl o^l_^ ju» j* Ul ciS" U 

The subscription (fol. 95^) is : *IVI Ji_j Ail ^j^jlr ^Ij ^^oSSl < _ r iJ l*. ^i->j ^1 Ai-all oLT 

F 

Ff. g$b-g6b are blank, and from the first line of fol. gya, in which it is stated " Seventy- 
second makalah of volume vi.," we infer that what follows is from another and more or less con- 
temporary MS. 

Ff. 97^-1136 : A treatise on the Holy Spirit, by John Chrysostom. 

Clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1790. 

G 

Fol. 114 blank. Ff. 114&-115& : The twenty-four acrostic and ethical sayings of Gregory 
Nyssen, the brother of St. Basil, composed according to the number of the letters of the alphabet. 

The first saying is : aJLSj d^l ►a, 4) I J*»-l 
Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1820. 

H 

Fol. 115& : A model of a certificate of marriage. 

•(•^•JJ* c*.^ ™ c*"^ "W ^4* ••>?* 



Dated a.d. 1821. Same hand as in G. 



I 



Fol. 116a : A copy of the order of the Greek Patriarch Joachim, concerning the amount 
of the dowry to be given to a marrying girl. This order was given by the Patriarch after con- 
sultation with the bishops of his diocese, on Sunday, the 28th June, of the year 7064 of the creation 
(a.d. 1551) and hung in the Church of SS. Cyprian and Justin in Damascus. 

II 



162 CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

J 

Ff . 118-119 contain, by a later hand, (a) a sermon, (b) a zajaUyah. 

An inscription on the fly-leaf at the beginning informs us that the MS. entered, on 
the 20th August, 1931, into the library of Severius, the West Syrian Metropolitan of Syria and 
Lebanon, 1 who has signed his name in Syriac (, 1 aSfcfo )~.»qjdj ■ «e«» »j »o cd) 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 70.] 



117. 

203 x 139 mm. 143 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The Dlwdn, or collection of poetical pieces, of the Maronite writer the monk Gabriel (or 
Germanus) Farhat, who died on the 10th July, a.d. 1732. 
Title: 

MEMORANDUM 
Begins : jlUll ^m\J\ oW^j J,^ j--VI l^\ ^3 ^jJ-l jJtfJI jlJI J^ii juj . . . 41 jlJ-I 

dAJij }LaA* ^i^l j> <ij«* Jt (^4. ^ »A» l^U j cu-w.} <~ry JU» Jail I j* <5j*-\ le- U^i-I c~*c 

In spite of the author's statement in the above quotation to the effect that he brought to- 
gether this Dlwdn in a.d. 1720, there are some pieces in it dated 1721-22 (fol. 136). The latter 
year is the last mentioned in the MS. 

The Dlwdn is arranged according to the alphabetical order, all pieces ending in Alif being 
collected and placed in one section, called ^ilVl 4JIS , and so on to the letter Yd', the pieces 
under which are similarly called »UI <jli 

No attention is paid to the chronological order. Pieces written in, say, 1696, and ending, 
for instance, in Bd\ are placed under the letter Bd' , together with some pieces which were written 
ten years later. The author has thus followed the process used in earlier Arabic Diwdns. 

The rubric which is placed before each piece gives generally the year and the occasion in 
which it was written, or the person to whom it was addressed. 

The first piece (fol. jb) was written in the year a.d. 1695. 

X**--* >u^ ^J-j iL^j ^ilt u- d)i> JU J y> 3 ^ r J\ jlJI £jtf- 41! ^j jlUll ^m\J\ JU 

The last piece in which a proper name is mentioned is on fol. 141a, and the rubric informs 
us that this piece was written in Tripoli in a.d. 1720, in honour of a friend of the author, the 
famous Armenian writer Makardij al-Kasih. 

1 Now the Syrian Patriarch of Antioch under the name of Ignatius Ephrem I. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 163 

cj^SLla <j J»- yJc*- \»\S will ji jfrj ^jVI ^.JDl e»*J* **-l *J &**"» ^-^5 4H ***j W J^ 

No date. Written in a clear and handsome Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1760. Main headings 
in thick black characters, and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins in 
ff. i-iii. 

On the last page are two owners' inscriptions, the first of which in date is by Michael, son of 
Makdasi (pilgrim) Kharuf, a Greek Orthodox who bought the MS. in 1807. The second inscrip- 
tion is by the priest Joseph Zarri, who bought the MS. for 125 Asadis, in a.d. 1835. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 99.] 

118. 

216 x 147 mm. 134 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

Same as the preceding MS., or the collection of the poetical pieces of the Maronite writer 
the monk Gabriel or Germanus Farhat. 

Title as above, ljj$\ or cj\*-J cf^jr C$x* 

The author's introduction is not found at the beginning, and I have taken the above title 
from the preceding MS. In every other respect the text of the two MSS. is similar. 

Dated (fol. 1346) 1st January, a.d. 1781, and written in Ziik Masij (sic) by Antony (Antun), 
son of Joseph Daifar. 

x*~~* jJlJj &>-\) Or** *-*" wan ***• J ^ t>* j* *$^\ 4^ ^ Jj' ^ • • • £-** 

Clear Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly broad margins on 
which here and there are some glosses. The lower half of fol. 1 is torn away, and has been 
replaced by white paper. The last folio is covered with scribblings by an owner. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 102.] 

119. 

225 x 165 mm. 112 leaves. Generally from twenty to twenty-three lines to the page. 
The Diwan, or collection of poetical pieces, of the melichite priest-monk Nicholas Sa'igh, 
who died in a.d. 1756. 

The pieces are arranged, as is often the case in such Diwans, according to rhymes (qafiyahs), 
from Alifto Ya', and not according to chronological order. 

Each important piece is preceded by a title, which gives its date, the place where it was 
written, the person for whom it was written, and the occasion which gave rise to it. 

The last piece in chronological order is that found on fol. 50&, with the date 1742. 



164 ■ CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS.— MISCELLANEA 

The first piece is headed : . . . JL-J.JI a-J$I ^js-j jiiiJ\ ►LjJI (J k» & ^£i»_ JU 4)1 <^j J^ 

U*-^_ jU jj> J y*.j <.?e— * t^.y^J iS^°^3 *i\*f3 •— *" ^*" 
and begins : «-L-jJl JJ* jiiJI _p 

The alphabetical order ends on fol. 946, and the pieces written on ff. 950-1 12& have not been 
placed under this order. 

Many pieces were written in the monastery of St. John (U^ jU ja), that of St. Isaiah 
(Uil jL. jj>), and that of St. Elias (<j"UI ^jU y j>). 

No date. Written in a clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1800. No rubrications of any kind. 

Towards the top of ff. 16-76, part of two to four lines is damaged by worms. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 118.] 

120. 

160 x 105 mm. 46 leaves. Generally fourteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff . 1-246 : A work on the Scapulary of Our Lady of Carmel. 

The work is divided into twelve chapters. 

B 

Ff. 250-260 are blank. 

Ff. 266-466 : A treatise on the Rosary. .;^Jull ,1+ J^lj i^ J I «J^> jL J 

Dated (fol. 466) 24th February, a.d. 1749: i^«— * \vi\ &- -ULM Yi J »j^\ j^j 
Negligent Syrian Naskhi. Headings in red or in thick black characters. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. 45.] 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX 

CATALOGUE OF SYRIAC MSS. CONTINUED FROM VOL. I. 

Mingana Syriac 607 

310 x 210 mm. 183 leaves. Two columns. Generally 33 lines to the column. 

A collection of miscellaneous treatises in Garshuni, with here and there quotations and general 
statements in Syriac. A general title to the work is provided by the following Syriac heading, 
found on fol. 26 : 

Jjuas; l=>Ko koo| ) i^ftS ^KtlVl \ > V^ooi \j\ Im^ • • • Jk-M^o )la*K*M) jL^- "^» 

A 
Ff. ia-2a : The Hussdya for the commemoration of the Consecration of the Church. 

B 

Ff. 26-236 : A treatise on the true Faith, Trinity, Incarnation, and the organisation of the 
Church. 

.ot «\ n V^Siv 

The work is divided into 8 bobs, which treat of : 

(1) Trinity and Incarnation, 

(2) Organisation of the Church, 

(3) Eucharistic bread and wine, 

(4) Attendance to prayer and the Mass, 

(5) Priesthood, 

(6) Priests, deacons, and penitence, 

(7) Prayer, 

(8) The first-born, and the vows. 

The work often gives the ecclesiastical Canons for each section. Among the Fathers quoted 

may be mentioned St. Ephrem, Jacob of Serug, Jacob of Edessa, Dionysius Barsalibi, Gregory 

Barhebraeus, and Epiphanius of Cyprus. 

The 7th bob contains an historical account of the Trisagion. The subscription is : 

167 



168 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

B 

Ff. 236-246 contain an ethical and spiritual illustration from the story of a man who had 
three friends. 

Headed : l/jj-co^ ȣ^* ^o ^-^ N ^-.k*>l ^Kaj J^-./o 

C 
Ff. 246-266 : The 99 commandments and recommendations found in the Gospels. 

D 

Ff . 266-296 : A homily on the Consecration and Renovation of the Church, by Moses bar 
Kepha. 

)a-o ^»/ ^.aaiai ^op^aSs ^do^oJjod > et\ »t n^S wiJIJ ^ao ^io w^w^Ja^c^ ^/Kd . . . 
)o^J-o 0&0JJ/ ci^aia^ .oMPyASaSx jJ^JJJ ~^i» -jooi^A ^jaieSiw vj*^° WbJ ^ m> ^ 

E 
Ff. 296-336 : A homily by the same Moses bar Kepha, on the temptation of our Lord. 

F 
Ff. 33^~36« : On the leper cleansed by our Lord. By the same Moses bar Kepha. 
v'*-£^° J- 3 - ^t»/ w bXDoa aa wdop^o^ u»oj-.o)-flo ™ - t aSfc \oa ^io oi^O.0^0 . . . 

•jp^ oUv^ v*° ^r^ °*M ~r^ J^-M ~^ °^-° ^J** ^ 

G 
Ff. 360-410 : A discourse on the Prophet Elijah, by St. Ephrem. 

H 
Ff. 416-1310 : A lectionary from the Gospels, with a commentary. 

The lessons are arranged according to the ecclesiastical year of the West Syrian Church. 
The text of the Gospels is written in red, and the commentary upon it in black. 



MINGANA COLLECTION x e 9 

The first lesson deals with the Consecration of the Church, and the last with the Com- 
memoration of the Martyrs. 

Among the Fathers quoted in the commentary, we may mention Jacob of Serug, Eusebius 
of Caesarea, Gregory Nyssen, St. Ephrem, Philoxenus of Mebbug, Dionysius Barsalibi, 
Hippolytus of Rome, Severus of Antioch, and Isidora the priest of Melitene. 

I 
Fol. 132a : A prayer to be recited in the night of dominical festivals. In Syriac. 

J 
Ff . I320-I33& : A parable drawn by the Doctors of the Church, from the apple, concerning 
the commentary on the Gospels. The parable is called " The parable of the apple." 

Headed in Syriac : JtuoAooo ycu^s^o/; )nto<?» ^\ jip>j fSs&ZQ woioma^j >o*io jJtoo 

K 

Ff. 133&-136& : The homily of Moses bar Kepha, on the Annunciation of Zechariah. 
^jo^c&v ou up o v |t.^oo \j2l+3 ^>) ..^Qpa^ u a ^op^aS s j»o^.o).^ , «i .. n^s ^>JjJ i^\a*£Ss 

.J.a_~a^ j^aieta voiJjlSs j-49j\ ^JhaSs pus. J-*^ oCS.)..© 

L 
Ff. 136&-139& : The homily of the same Moses bar Kepha, on the Annunciation of Mary. 
^-a/ ^ipa a a a ^dop^o^ wflDoV*oj^D en ., nV ^aJJ/ ^oo ^io oiJ^J^ q1^Q>q^cl^ . . . 

.^a-po Ipo ojJoiJ^C^ oi t « mW ^JbaS^ ^/f-a^ o,j)jl» wX* *SJ.a Ja-o 

M 
Ff. 1396-1430: : The discourse of Jacob of Serug, on love, 
ogupe > 9 i nm / o o n v , ^;|^e ^opvi^s ^JJ/o vi^o^>aSs yJA^aaSs ^.od ,_*> pcuio 

.01 > MiVJ^ wCbA 0<\)-0 ^^^flD 

N 
Ff. I43«-I486 : A homily on Sunday. 

The homily is anonymous, but it is possibly by the above Moses bar Kepha. 

O 
Ff. 1486-1494 : The short prayers of the Hours. 



170 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

P 

Ff. 149&-1506 : The lesson for Pentecost, from the Gospel of John, with a detailed com- 

Q 

Ff. 150&-153& : The Passion Harmony, from the four Gospels, to be recited on the eve of 
Good Friday. 

The text of the Gospels has a commentary attached to it. 

R 

Ff. 1536-161^ : A theological treatise, containing ten questions asked by a pupil, and 
answered by a teacher. 

.oi*k^j *i\ , „ ock&3». ^o^ )oui» ^.J-flD w^s > ^>)mv> $J^> . . . 

Ff. 1576 and 158a contain the colophon, about which see below. 

S 

Ff. 161&-1680 : Lessons from the Gospels, and a commentary upon them. Among the 
commentators we may mention Severus of Antioch, Cyril of Alexandria, and John Chrysostom. 

On fol. 161& there is an inventory of the effects of the monastery of Natif, which were de- 
posited with 'Abd al-Ahad, son of Salmi (JojJs ^^ A^iSs v-j^ ~j^ > -/ ** ^ o^oj 01501 

On fol. 162& is a formula for making Chinese ink, called here " soot ink." Among the in- 
gredients are : " soot ; one-third part of Arabic gum ; one-third part of this Arabic gum, of indigo ; 
and the same quantity of colocynth, mixed with turmeric." 

Headed : j)..V^> \ x^Ss oijoj 

T 
Fol. 172a : The second chapter of the Book of Wisdom. 

U 
Ff . 1730-1820 : The Book of the Prophet Daniel. 
Headed : "M-j/j i«xaj ^*o ^.oJJJ w4~jj 

V 

Ff . 1820-1830 : Sections of the Book of Isaiah. 

Dated (fol. 1576) in the year 1866 of the Greeks (a.d. 1555), and written in Mardin, near the 
Church of the Forty Martyrs, by the priest Mansur, son of 'Abd al-'Aziz, from the village of 
Zaz in Tur 'Abdln, in the time of the West Syrian Patriarch Ignatius 'Abdallah, who was from 
the village of Kal'at al-'Imr'ah ; and of the Maphrian Basil Ni'mat Allah, from Mardin 



MINGANA COLLECTION 171 

The copyist mentions also the Patriarchal Vicar, Bishop Gregory 'Abd al-Ghani " with a 
voice having sweet modulations," son of Stephen ; and the monks, Paul and 'Ata Allah. 



.ot/poJJ/ oibXo otfjj^a^aSs i^oo)_o ^0 oC^\»-x^ ^ai»JJJ-2> ujaKA ^^J_x§x vl^oooSx 
)^v /as jod^Jjo^ ^5/ o£^\ oi^abu ».ok.i\Y>^s ^axoJJJ-s wOsAoclSs ^o'pvi^s > mo ,\ . en -> s_.;).ioo 

asanas \J-^9 '-*^> Y>— ii ^0 w^w^ oC^s^s oucu^o ,^>. V) / ^*X*Oa I > >m . t n \o J'OU^ 

.oC^^O. %J-^9 -Ai.O O|i|<l50/ -*^)CU u^ 

On fol. zyib is a Syriac inscription, in the handwriting of the above Maphrian Basil Ni'mat 
Allah, which begins : ).».<» v>» )_sq— I . mo »\ » m -> ».>..^f ^-dj J-^iooJkio J-.K-/ >Q-i^ , and a half- 

obliterated seal, which appears to be his. Below this inscription and this seal is a note of sale 
and purchase, in 1911 of the Greeks (a.d. 1600). The proper names in this note have been 
rendered illegible by a late owner. 

On fol. 168& is a long Garshuni inscription in the handwriting of the monk 'Abd ad-Daim), 
in which we are informed that the West Syrian Patriarch Ignatius Ni'mat Allah (who succeeded 
the above Patriarch 'Abdallah) gave the present MS. to the deacon Elijah, son of Musa (Moses), 
known as Ibn Muzid, in the year 1881 of the Greeks (a.d. 1570). Between the two columns of 
fol. 157 b is an inscription by this Patriarch Ni'mat Allah, making a gift of this MS. to the above 
deacon Elijah, whom he calls " my son." 

"^s^JJ/ J;oi ;/j oi-oJjq-. vojj^oio j-*/o ot 4 *cu)^olo ^aSs oUtt wj& ^;/KSs yj^ |^0^ . . . 

t^^oJJi oi'oi s^too . . . jao p cS s . ..flp).v> >\\ oo..vi^o onj V^s . >m«.^ oi^oioj j-o u»a^J.i^-( 

On fol. 169a is a note of reading by Archelides, son of the deacon Hanna, in the year 2133 of 
the Greeks, which corresponds with 1237 of the Hijrah, and 1822 of our era. 

A clear, neat and handsome East Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 
Fairly broad margins. . 

Ff. 170-183 are supplied by a modern hand, and loosely added to the book by an Eastern 
binder. 



J 72 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

Mingana Syriac 608 

209 x 157 mm. 150 leaves. Nineteen and twenty-five lines to the page, according to the 
hand used in the MS. 

A ' 

Ff. 1 and 4 : Fragment of the Life of the Abbot Moses the Ethiopian. In Garshuni. 

Ff. 2 and 3 are blank, but the text is continuous. 

B 

Ff. 56-1460 : The theological and controversial work, mainly against the Roman Catholic 
teaching, by the West Syrian Maphrian Basil Shim'un (Simon) of Tur 'Abdln (or Turani). In 
Garshuni. 

Title : ^^ ^jj^ 

ARMOUR OF FAITH 
~/ wisoo^^i^ ^po jo|*M&t ^Ji/ vfl^i.i, ^0 v , n< a k ^fa ^^ ^jj^ ^j^ # 

The work is divided into sixteen bobs, sub-divided into fasls. The first bob begins (fol. ga) : 

UX>U^ JJ OP/ ~^ ^oJJ/ ^.^ ^ 0j 3 ^^» <*-J* aDjA*^ 1<£M ^}jj ^oJJ/ ^|b^. 

The last bab begins (fol. 141a) : ,^ix^s a»;Io VJ Ss s „jLa> s^/Ao ^ M*y» { JjoSk ^JLaSs, 

An index of the babs is on ff. $b-6b. 

C 

Ff. 1466-148* : A short treatise on chronology, for ecclesiastical use and dominical festivals. 
In byriac. 

.^JOO JjLLAO J-~',Lrt> )j)^0 jboOJ} )lMft^ . . . 

Dated (ff 1460 and 1480) 2039 of the Greeks (a.d. 1728), and written in the monastery of 
Za faran, by the monk Thomas of Mosul, for the monk George, son of Makdasi Alyan Fattal, 
of the family of John Musaddi of Aleppo, in the time of the West Syrian* Patriarch Ignatius 
Shukrallah and of the Maphrian Basil Shim'un, and of the Bishops Gregory 'Abd-al Ahad, 
Ttoothy Isa, Basil Gorgls (George) of Aleppo, Iwannis (John) Karas, 'Azar, Asian, and 'Abd- 

^o ^ 00,0 ^^^ u»;io ^ _jL» ^/jso j^^ ^jUaoSs oJKA. ),c ^o j>ol 
v ^; ^^ ? ;/o u»^ ^! r ^tio^ v ^ v o^a A v JL4j^ „t J^^, m> w po 



MINGANA COLLECTION 173 

^o wj^cSs \±~ yo *^=> ^o Jj**3s ^/Ka^ V J-^ ^oj^o ^ ^H^K, Of 8 -J 

w-J aDo/Kxt^ -poo j-JJJ I y>Joo -J ^MV\ -*** V ^^ vJ-*** -I aoa " N " m ^ 
-poo v^~ oUop-*> ^J4 aa^i^ V '^°° ~' *** & -*>* -P°° -«^ v'^ 00 

.^.b^aSK o-^jSs t-^ ?><k* op4j&* >£^ oU*> ^3 

The colophon on fol. 148a is in Syriac. 

Written in two clear West Syrian hands. Ff . 7 ~47 are in a bold script, and were written by 
the deacon Ibrahim (Abraham). An Arabic note at the bottom of fol. 476 states that this 
deacon Abraham died after writing the above leaves. The rest of the MS. is in a thmner hand. 
Ff. 1-6 and 14 are supplied by a later hand. 

Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

An owner has written on fol. 148& the different forms of the Roman letters of the alphabet. 

Mingana Syriac 609 

214 x 149 mm. 14 leaves. Generally from twenty-five to twenty-seven lines to the page. 
Leaves containing part of a collection of miracles performed by the Virgm. In Garsnum. 
The following stories are found more or less complete in the MS. : 

(1) Fol. ia : The story of a rich man of the city of Rome, who became poor. 

Begins : o* v J*o J-jl^ ^; cpo^A <*-*><>; oWpo ~ft v ^ V^**^ ~^' *" 

.o^;o o i iffl «> ot/poj 

(2) Fol. za : The story of an army officer of Antioch, called Gallienus. 

Begins : jSm v>o udcju^ <*~*>J P^> )t4* ou^l M**/ ~* V* D vJ ^^ 

.oiv-Kd \s>\m>± j±.± Ft** r^ ^ 

(3) Fol. 46 : The story of a pagan to whom the Virgin appeared. 
Begins : ouu; -^ Jie&J* v l* on/ Jaj-Ss ^o^> ^ N =fc— o 

(4) Fol. 6b : The story of a Jew who had cattle and sheep. 

Begins : yoU^Jo w^/oio ^> o£k y> yj-* jooU^ j^» ^ ^^^> 

(5) Fol. 126 : The story of a rich man of the city of Rome, who became poor. 

Same as above (fol. ia). 

Incomplete at the end. Something is missing between ff. 1-2, 4-5, 5-°» 0-9, 9-10, 12-13. 



i 74 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

No date. Written in two clear West Syrian hands of about a.d. 1550. The first hand 
on ff. 1-8 and the second hand on ff. 9-13. No headings. 

On fol. 14& an owner, the priest 'Abdallah, has written a note on the severe cold that 
occurred in the district of Mosul in the year 2068 of the Greeks (a.d. 1757), when the Tigris was 
frozen up from the 15th December, for fourteen days, and cattle and sheep perished in large 
numbers. 

The note begins : i$-a ;/j oi*j)ja*S6t ^ . 1 ee > ^o oueo ^.K^joo o»-u^oio ^aSs <*n» ^ 

V-^a-o M^ -k~ "^avl ^Jjb JJo M*^ Jas (aoo . . . ^1 <**o ta^l ^so ja~4*. 
.^.ojJJ vcuja ^£ p^> ^.fa.vo ^3 ua-au. ^jaae&t w>3 ^v ^Ji N ^ )ax*u ^\?«w>o 



Mingana Syriac 610 

Twelve leaves of varying sizes, put together from three different MSS. 

A 

Ff . 1-7 : A collection of poetical pieces. In Syriac. 

A piece on fol. 5a is on Wine, and is attributed to St. Ephrem. 

Begins : £*o > ..i») ^ J<*S^ .^cupj ~p°! JP 6 ^ ^^? )K^^oo 

B 
Fol. 8 ; A maimra on the Construction of the Human Body, by St. Ephrem. 

.(ju^>» o^l9o; ^^9 y^\.s>\ w*po; )p4*> 

Begins : y+oofc*. ^j\ ^K-Jo (IS^jLa Jt-a; \-z-l 

C 

Ff. 9-12 : A fragment of a Syriac- Arabic dictionary. 
No date. Three West Syrian hands of about 1550-1580. 

Mingana Syriac 611 

202 x 145 mm. 141 leaves. Generally twenty-two lines to the page. 

The Ritual of the Uniate Syrian Church of Malabar (India). 

A later hand has entitled the work on fly-leaf i, as Rituale Chaldaico-Malabaricum, and de- 
scribes the MS. more fully on the next fol. in a long Latin note which begins : " Ritualis liber 
Malebarum," and ends : " plerumque e Rituali Rom. excriptus saeculo 16 ." 

The majority of the prayers found in the MS. are translated from Latin into Syriac, but 
some, are taken from the East Syrian or Nestorian Ritual. Very often the rubrics are in the 



MINGANA COLLECTION x 75 

vernacular dialect of Malabar transliterated in Syriac characters, but often also they are in 



Syriac. 

A 



Ff . 1&-30 : The Ritual of Ash Wednesday. 

.J^>; J^ooj? J^oj* >an\^ 1^* >***! ^4 

B 
Ff . 30-96 : The Ritual of Palm Sunday. 

.^44^1 ji^*> J-P°? oPojl=, W ? aa^=> r o ? ; ot*^ U^ol • • • U±*°l 

C 

Ff. 06-166 : The Ritual of Baptism of a male child. 

On fol. 9 b it is said that the Ritual was translated from Latin into Syriac by a certain 
Thomas and the Metropolitan Francis. 

Ff. 166-216 : The Ritual of Baptism of a female child. 

Ff. 216-276 : The Ritual of Baptism of many people. 

))v, ^ ^*; J**^! ) ma t 

D 
Ff . 276-300 : The Ritual of the benediction of the Holy Water, called Henana. 

.(sic) )-*• > .. a ^J^» U±~ ^ -v>N J^W 

E 
Ff. 300-326: The Ritual of Marriage. J^oo/? U-*f* M ^^J W 2 ^ 

F 
Ff. 326-450 : The Ritual of Extreme Unction. .Jot-p; J-~**>! U*-*l 

G 
Ff. 456-500 : The Ritual of the Preparation to the Mass. 

The text is not translated from Latin, but is that of the East Syrian Liturgy, and embraces 
the section which extends from the beginning of the Liturgy to the reading of the Gospel. 

H 
Ff . 500-516 : The Ritual of the Sacrament of Penitence and Absolution. 



176 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

I 
Ff. 516-520 : The Blessing of a new house. 

.Jj,j-* )K^s ^i»; )Kd;q_s 

J 

Fol. 52 : The Blessing of a given place. 

K 

Ff. 526-536 are filled up with a note written in the vernacular dialect of Malabar, but in 
Syriac characters, and ff. 540-550 are blank. 
Ff. 556-840 : The Eucharistic Liturgy. 

The text is generally that of the East Syrian Liturgy, with some additions taken from the 
Roman Mass. 

L 

Ff. 856-1286 : The Lessons, mostly from Pauline Epistles and from the Gospels, to be recited 
on special occasions. 

The first lessons concern the Votive Mass of the Virgin Mary (fol. 856), of the Apostles (fol. 
866), and of the dead (fol. 876). The other occasions for which lessons are given in the MS. 
are the following : 

The 1st Sunday in Advent (fol. 89a). 

The 2nd Sunday in Advent (fol. 896). 

The 3rd Sunday in Advent (fol. 906). 

The 4th Sunday in Advent (fol. gia). 

The Nativity (fol. 920). 

St. Stephen Protomartyr (fol. 946). 

St. John the Evangelist (fol. 956). 

The Holy Innocents (fol. 96a). 

The Circumcision (fol. gya). 

The Purification of the Virgin (2nd February) (fol. 986). 

St. Matthias (fol. 996). 

The Virgin Mary (25th March) (fol. 1000). 

SS. Philip and James (1st May) (fol. 1006). 

St. John the Baptist (24th June) (fol. 101). 

St. Thomas the Apostle (3rd July) (fol. 1020). 

St. James the Apostle (fol. 1026). 

The Transfiguration (6th August) (fol. 1030) 

The Assumption of the Virgin (15th August) (fol. 1040). 

St. Bartholomew (fol. 1046). 

The Feast of the Virgin, Mother of God (8th September) (fol. 105a). 

The Holy Cross (13th September) (fol. 1066). 

St. Matthew the Apostle (21st September) (fol. 1066). 



MINGANA COLLECTION 177 

The Archangel Michael (29th September) (fol. 107a). 
SS. Simon and Jude (28th October) (fol. 108b). 
All Saints (1st November) (fol. 1086). 
All the Dead (2nd November) (fol. 1096). 
St. Andrew the Apostle (30th November) (fol. nob). 
SS. Peter and Paul (29th June) (fol. uia). 
Ash Wednesday (fol. 112a). 
Palm Sunday (fol. 113a). 
Maundy Thursday (fol. 114a). 
Good Friday (fol. 1156). 

Resurrection : two lessons, one for Saturday evening and one for Sunday morning (ff. 
n6b-ujb). 

Monday after the Resurrection (fol. 118a). 

Tuesday after the Resurrection (fol. 'i 196). 

Wednesday after the Resurrection (fol. 120a). 

New (or Low) Sunday (fol. 121b). 

The Ascension (fol. 122b). 

Pentecost (fol. 1230). 

Holy Trinity (fol. 124&). 

The Passion of our Lord (fol. 1246). 

The Mass for the Remission of Sins (fol. 125&). 

The Mass for the sick (fol. 126a). 

The Mass for a specified need (fol. 1266). 

The Mass for the bridegroom and bride (fol. 1270). 

The Mass for travellers on land and sea (fol. 128^). 

M 

Ff. 129-132 are blank. Ff. 133-141 : The Baptismal Liturgy, in the vernacular dialect of 
Malabar. 

On fly-leaf xxvi at the end is the following Latin inscription : 

Liber Ritualis Ecclesiae Malabaricae lingua Chaldaica scriptus 
adiectis nonnullis rubricis lingua Malabarica charactere Carscienico. 

Vide " Examen Codic. Indie. — Bibliot. de Prop. Fide a P. 
Paulino," pag. 69. N°. XXII. 

No date. Written in a clear East Syrian hand of about A.D. 1550. Main headings in thick 
black Estrangela characters, and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Early Italian 
binding. 

On fol. xixb at the beginning is a Latin note by a man who signs himself " M.A.C.," to the 
effect that he gave the MS. in Rome, on the 16th September, 1883, to Father Reginald Walsh. 



12 



J 78 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

Mingana Syriac 612 

237 x 180 mm. 248 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

The first volume of an extensive collection of the poetical works of St. Ephrem. 

•P^X Jj.a^.*> J~,oxd ^'^>l v-po Jj^j^ ^t-^? JKa^aa* jjtfpo; J^Ao . . . 

From the index on fly-leaves iv£-v& at the beginning, we gather that there are 3328 strophes 
in the volume. A statement to this effect is also found in the colophon (fol. 247a). 

As the title implies, the volume mostly contains the madhrashd and sughiyatha of St. Ephrem 
as exhibited m different MSS. found in the churches and monasteries of the East. 

The madhrashi and sughiyatha are 207 in number, and each deals with the ecclesiastical 
festival or commemoration to which it is assigned. 

The first and the last three begin as follows : 

Fol. lb : The Renovation of the Church. 

M M ~^oi (sic) )lp> ^xj;/ . . . J^p ojoi JKl-ox* Uipo .JAp> j.,a~ ^ jUVpo 

Fol. 20a : The Annunciation of Zacharias. 
ouj—, ^oAoo W 4 ^ • • . )oo, ^»Kd W m (joiD Up,, o,p>o*> ^ ^ Vpo 

Fol. 25a : The Annunciation of the Virgin. ' '* 

f~* 1^1 )oo, *dfca W . . . N*a y~\* C^ol ;o-po )o^ Ij^j oi^a* ^o>, j^y* 

Fol. 2300 : The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste. ' « ° , ' r *° *"°* 

N M* • • • U**o ^a^> ax* jK^m .~£*>j^, ),oU ^^j/, ),J^ J^, 

T>1- 77 t ">> I > - *> 

The madhrasha is acrostic. : 

Fol. 2376 : The Commemoration of St. Ahud'emmeh. 

.)p>> a^ J^ y^l . . . J^op ^^ ^ j~^ .opo/jo-./ ^po; Jjjxa Jjtfpa 

Fol. 239a : The Commemoration of the Confessors. 

a n 2tt n 6 (f01 M 4 l1 ^ M0SU 1 ™ thC 25th May ° f the year 22 45 of the Greeks and 
a.d 1934, by the Deacon Matthew, son of Paul, in the time of the West Syrian Patriarch Ignatius 
Ephrem 1 Barsaum, and Athanasius Thomas, Metropolitan of Mosul. 

l~SO*» >4»J ^PO U.^ J*J^CU»0 UV^O ^O O^ ^*-., )jo, jU** y^Klolo >^ 

vV ^o )N*Mo JAM U^ ^00., fe^o ^jbo JKjl^o- y* UVpo J*^ >^o 
JK-jo- U*x~o ^^;/o v i^oo ^tf* ^| J^ J^^oo^o j*aj ^. ? jj* . . . jJU Wo 



MINGANA COLLECTION 179 



-po • • • ^teouua . . . ow J—t-» i-J-* Aj/ vP°^ ^°»/° **kM© JJaoxilo ^aSs Kjlji *-*oi? 
tOA.10a2 OjJoiJO J^J^OJO j-*ja,£0 ^bo ).Oiu^); Jj3^.^^0 J^ooj_o ^ooft^ )°-'f aS / wflOO>^) I «d 

. . . Jjoi j-2»Ka\ o*^Kdo . . . )&> »nt .$/ ^joio Kj-.poa )joi J-^fco ^-»> ^fcol|o . . . 
j-fcYpo » »\ot K&lSo K^Aoo .j_A-.;ai» oi^\ Oj ^ oXl t-^ <-flDQ^.Q-3 ) ..IV) t-a uaoo_»£oo ) f f N/s»s* 
J^ooi ~poj JlA;o ^o-»po )o£^ l^-*? )Ij^j Jb$j k» a^ ^ « <■ * ^t ; pL«AOt J-sKd ^io JKjL^itto 

.JJ^^Od Jft^JM otAocu*3o o<KoKdo ^.jo^co )^->..,«Xa 

4*0 )iq\vo ).. mv> )t-cu/ >,„»,l\Q3 

As stated in the above colophon the volume is collected from various MSS. found in 
different churches and monasteries of the East. One of these MSS. contains the folio wing 
colophon : 

" Written in the month of October of the year 1889 of the Greeks (a.d. 1578), in the time of 
the West Syrian Patriarch Ignatius David Shah, and of the Maphrian Gregory Pilate. ... It 
was written in the monastery of St. Behnam and of his sister Sarah. ... It was written by the 
monk John, son of 'Abd al-Masih, son of Yawno, and by the monk Joseph, son of Jamal ad-Din, 
at the instance of the monk Joseph and his carnal sister Sidah, who was a nun called Sister Mary." 

KlJi )fiu,yXi ^^fcK-» j-ft-VpO Oi-3 > n\,«,V>,«i; JjU* jho )joi j-sKs j-^ooaA J^oo/ Idjx> ^ftt 
-P0 j^JQJX)} j ,.., DO ...^j/» j^^.^3 K-'t-C yOi) . . . (-iL-t-O jl.O*o/ >&VK>.iO )^P>^0 J.XJCJL.J s^sA^l 

)p.^ w^AoJL/ . . . ^oa^ysd 001; )^*oU9 (-W )—Jt^o; )« »jA*o ^^ija^u ^poo oi)-». 90/9 

yOOllOL^J ^.©lO^-i— )»OM» y »\ "> j/o 0<K~ Jf-»0 ^OJOi-S -PO J >QM»1 J-^Jlo )-^J0 ) uIm |?0«-CD9 

^3-flDCL* L.^.»o cuQ-. ^ > .. »Aac&> t-2u^ ^ -i-a^ Pp*; Jjoi J-»Ka^ ^.9 oi^Ao »^* W y.Vl\ 

^JLDKiOj Oft-*J» )k-*t-*J 0|K~90 ^a^OQ- ^ij Oi^9 )Ia2L*»-*J3 )oOt > «>\v> ,x )fr>4* )lV>>Q|V> j-S 

On critical grounds, a few poetical pieces found in the MS. cannot be by St. Ephrem. 

Marked on the title-page as the first volume : )-^o^o J-a^o; Vl.*s/ ^pck> Jjt-Vpoj J-»JS^> 

Clear and handsome West Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly 
broad margins. 

Mingana Syriac 613 

213 x 180 mm. 292 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

The second volume of an extensive collection of the poetical works of St. Ephrem. 

•J-^I J-ta^io (^.jo^o ye^'f^j *^po J-t^j-fi; JAoL^»o U»V*>» ^*W» )J.<V^9 . . . 

From the index on the fly-leaves i&-ii& at the beginning, we gather that there are 227 
madhrashe and 4201 strophes in the volume. As in the first volume, the MS. contains madhrashe 



i8o SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

and sughiydtha of St. Ephrem as exhibited in many MSS. found in different churches and 
monasteries of the East. Each group of madhrdshe is assigned to an ecclesiastical festival or 
commemoration in which it was sung. 

The first and the last three groups of madhrdshe begin as follows : 

Fol. lb : The Epiphany. 

*-*J-0»* . . . po^o J^o* )ki. n-> )K*^wt> .J;om ^jjja-^ v poj oipax ^^ J^Vpo 

Fol. 546 : John the Baptist. 

Fol. 630 : The Rogations of the Ninevites. 
.jJLbo; ^<xl~ o^ ^ Ja^ao : As-ujo ^jq- JiaSs ot\ ^/ . . . J^xi jq^ Joi^i ^^, JjtVt^o 

Fol. 2016 : The Passion. 
.)Ki* ^jj ^00 ~oioAa/ Jla\ : ^^jt Jj<£xx\ 01^0 : Jjsj ouaa-^ W . . . Jju-j )j\^a*> 
Fol. 228a : The Resurrection. 
.yooi^o Jj£^» ^/ JK*^ ^-^ai J^oa- ]jou> . . . )K.. „->i v poj oiAocu^> ^> ? JaVj^o 
Fol. 265a : The Resurrection. 
.J-L£axx\ Jooi o t ^M . nrt v po ^-^j . . . )K*io K^ ^0 v po ? oiKmua ^^, ^ J^^ 

Written for me (fol. 292) at Mosul on Friday, 26th October, a.d. 1934, by, the deacon 
Matthew, son of Paul, in the time of Ignatius Ephrem I, West Syrian Patriarch of Antioch, and 
Athanasius Thomas, Metropolitan of Mosul. 

Copied from various MSS. some of which found in the Church of our-Lady and in that of 
St. Thomas at Mosul, dated from the thirteenth century, or from the time of Barhebneus, 
down to 2041 of the Greeks (a.d. 1730). 

v paV ^;/o v KMo H*o±*U ssSs j\j/ Kjla U*^ ^pi, J^.^ JA000-. as JKaop> ? 
^ooj^ ^.s/ ooi; )«m,.\.i J^ojos, U>W£* ^°^4U^l ~t-*> . . . )?,..-> JloU/ , y.vxy.^ 
Isook w-poj Jlp^ ^jaboj )^»;old ^ ).*>oi J^s.Aas*^o oxxwdJj/J,/ ^poo . . . J-Ajoio 

J~i*> ^ Ja^ )it vn ,v> yaLX*, u»a-K* . . . )nmv»o J| . .„y> ^j/, J^JLa , ^>KdJ./ 
. . . )*.*~oo )i°>\.v>> oik-xsl yJ{ oiJ.o-x.Kd iooio . . . ^jaioj )Kd^-^> JKju^o ^io; ^a^as 
JJsAo "^ oi.Jj.oa9 ^ K^fcoo ♦) Y . c>\ .. m ^ J^-j-o jopojubo 001 ouJ^l*> usuaaSs ;oto^ 
)Kj-pa* U^-* Noi ~po; )i^jo ^a-po Joi^ l^, )lp, jb?J K^x* v .....^ jJL.Ao> 
vi»o-.;a^.^ ^.po |a^j^> ^ tea^a ^x.Ks> £to yoouLioo JK^jcl. jUa Kjjls , . ^ A « ; ^.jaioj 

.(x»$AiO J-.J-XV ^s J-*J»^oj J-xoaoo ) l.5\\.V> 



' MINGANA COLLECTION 181 

Clear and handsome West Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fairly 
broad margins. 

Marked on the title-page as the second volume. 



Mingana Syriac 614 

208 x 147 mm. 8 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

A fragment of a MS. containing the grammatical and lexicographical works of David bar 
Paulus and of Elijah, Metropolitan of Nisibin. 

On fol. 6a is the following heading : Jch^a ^^ aS ^^ ^floaS»os ^ t-»o>? <*^-»? p oC^-? 

. Z_tj "^so Y t v\\? "^^j )jAaao , and on fol. Sb another heading reads : ^»po> o£^»> p ot^-o 

.(tO^oo (^cla > ^s^ )-soj} j_^\as^>o j^» 

No date. Written in a clear and handsome East Syrian hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings 
in red. 

The first fol., which served as a fly-leaf to the original MS., contains a medical prescription 
of a magical character. 

Mingana Syriac 615 

162 x in mm. 22 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A collection of the miracles of the Virgin, attributed to Buktur (Bacterius, or Victor). 

yoai JoiU3t-*> JoilJJj ^o-po ^; r ^s JjKid ^4^ ^x^ ^*> ^Kdj <*S^ yox^ J^-Jo 

,^j^0 wJ& sJB^J^jj/ J*X!^> ^c£LS ^4* .^*>/ Jj^.*> 

Identical with No. 352 L. See Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of Manuscripts, vol. i., 
p. 651. 

No date. Clear and slightly bold West Syrian hand of about a.d. 1600. No rubrications. 



Mingana Syriac 616 

236 x 162 mm. 39 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 16-29& : The theological and mystical work entitled J^ujooi ),n\o«> , The Ascent of the 
Mind, by Abu'l-Ma'ani 'Aziz b. Sabta, the West Syrian Patriarch of Tur 'Abdin, who died under 
the name of Ignatius VII in a.d. 1481. 



i8 2 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

As in Mingana Syriac 79 (q.v.) the work is divided into seven pasuke, which begin on ff. lb, 
$a, ya, 10a, 15a, iSa (this chapter is subdivided into three visions )ly~), and 26a. 

The first chapter begins : (jotaj vJa-a owoot^ )>— * Jls***** xjo j-~? ^oJ-Vo/l ^^»; (-*^>t-o ^aro3 

and the last chapter begins : JU~» );ij ^0 t-a^ ).-». ^o fc a k-J> )$oj > ^j | . » n » "»» J^oia.3 

B 
Ff. 300-330 : The Profession of Faith of Gregory Barhebraeus. 

There are two quotations from Ignatius of Antioch (fol. 316), three from Athanasius of 
Alexandria (fol. 32), and one from Dioscorus of Alexandria (ff. 326-330;). 

C 

Ff. 33&-37& : An anonymous theological treatise in which it is proved that the Christ as 
born of the Father and of Mary is one. 

.(fcs^oK-3 ^00 W ^o> Ij^wtJ* J. tv y\ jjuijja ^e )io?6ii» . . . 

Dated (ff. 260-330, and 39a) Thursday, 15th November, 1 of the year 2199 of the Greeks and 
a.d. 1888, and written by Abraham, son of Paul, in the time of the West Syrian Patriarch 
Ignatius Peter III from Mosul, and of Dionysius Behnam, Metropolitan of Mosul, and of Cyril 
Elias, bishop of the monastery of St. Matthew (Shaikh Matti). 

Jjl»;I ^-»jjtl ^JJ )J.Of£»o )JL» fho j^jJoot )n\ort>» Jjoi Jm^Ao )A^oaA )l/o ^Auaojo ^a 

(sic) ^Ajaboj )ft.jupo \fjz±. yjso J^K-Al wfloo^d 001; u3dq-^(jl^i| ^po ^po . . . ) y , » ... -> )lot£{ 
J^-jpo* J^£o;a9 t-»— / wCDO^m)joi^ (-Ajoio w^-Aa^yJQo .ffift»mju^; ^.po ycojo .)tvim..,.v> 

p> J)001r-2»/ OOli ^KDO ^.^0^9 jL^y^O ^A o\j . . . (.-joi/ -g>)-.^S -Ot-^Otf OOiJ |..^I»,V> ^ ^A^Sj 

The copyist mentions also the priests Isaac Khajimah and Behnam Tha'laban, evidently 
also of Mosul. 

Clear and slightly bold West Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Red 
rulings. Fairly broad margins. 



1 The first part (ff. 1-33) was completed on the 4th of September (fol. 33a). 



MINGANA COLLECTION 183 

Mingana Syriac 617 

268 x 182 mm. 290 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The service-book for the ferial days of the week, from Monday to Saturday inclusive, according 
to the Melchite Church. 

)k*a^> ^-.poAoo; Jjo*o[t] J-**° ^=>*°^ ^-V** ^^^ ^^ V^°? < **~-' ^^ 
Ut<i+ ^o uxAAio; ).«8«lv> (sic) ^Juo^l^JLioo J-aoooi»» 1^4 y^l )ki* oiXdi |^o£~* 
: J : ^1 J^m Jjoi* .J^xjo v Vl? (aoo.» 1^*+* Jl* M*>f* »U»» J-oioK^ )-;a^ 

Ff. 1-38* : 1st tune, with the subscription : )-o<u ^*v> ujoa^/j Jm^; paxfi a*x^». 
Ff. 386-77*: 2nd tune : ^^o JlaaJl "^ h^> *?>k M*r* UA >***1\ U**l **° l 

Ff . 77«-ina : 3rd tune : Jjjo ^-*Vlj N<x-? J-^o Jj^a* ^ .v£* ^^o» P**4 *■*»*• 

.^J J . Jl JSjboo (JUlxJ. ^^ 

Ff. 1110-144& : 4th tune : J-^ : ^ y>n* M*>r* |^~*$ Ji»»t U^\ U**l ^ol 

.5^o J*L^o JjLx^ .**>o*o^l J *il, •! •-** )***!• I?^ 30 ? I 1 ^* 1 ^ ^^ 

Ff . 1446-177* : 5th tune : )a* a ^.fij N*-> M*j* )■*•»>".. )x>^ Jj^» ^W ^ o1 

Ff. 1770-2086 : 6th tune : ^oo. ? M*r° J-K-k* ^ )*-** «^>? U^ ^^ ^ oI 

Ff . 2086-2416 : 7th tune : ^ J^» ^flf Jaoa. t M*r» J «£a Jiu* ? JmaJ -*>* 

,^J .| .Jl wi»o})^ ^oau/ ♦)?<**> ^^o J3Jbo ^^o )Ia^-.l 

Ff. 2416-273* : 8th tune, the prayers of which are said to have been composed by St. 
Anastasius, the Abbot of Mount Sinai : ~po M^ J>°-*>? ^ ± ^° l ^^ ^^ " = * >i 

jisjhoo )i~u? ^ ^ v vi? N^! M»r* --^i ^r° ,;a ^ ? ' H *-*j* a -f*^ J l 

At the end of this tune is a subscription to the effect that all the Canons composing the above 
8 tunes were translated from Greek into Syriac by John, son of Isa, from the village of Rum- 
manah- JKu o^>j l**~* )k*a^ ^1^1 M ^^ ^*°° ^ ~^ 

x Not i?owy«, as in Baumstark, Geschichte d. Syrisch. Lit., p. 338. 



184 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

Ff . 2730-2770 contain the Canons recited on the first Sunday in Lent : ^po/Aooj Jjqjlo ^ol 

Ff . 2776-2826 : The Canon of the dead : \a^ ^ao; \y^-*^ \oo«^a ^^ Jjclld ^aol 
.o«\ ..o.pn.i oi )boatt5> .wx>ck^ .J *jJL .mm .aid »\\ en ->; l^°°J? )^>-^* yo<i+ po/Kioj 

Ff . 2826-2876 : The Canon of the end of the world and of the second coming of Christ : 

)^OOJ9 JLSJLS^ >OO^d po/too ) 1 V> » ^*lVl? OfKJLj^O ^^^O J.^OL^OAO )l»— N ^A j.JQJ_0 ^3ol 

Ff. 2890-2900 contain the prayer called " Aksifus," for the week-days : ,_/»jV j>y~£\ ^& 

Dated, in an Arabic colophon (ff. 2876-2880) Tuesday, 17th July, 6989 of the Creation 
(a.d. 1481), and written by the deacon Joseph, son of the priest John, son of the priest Dumit, 
from the village of Kufiir in Mount Lebanon, which was under the administration of Tripoli, for 
the priest Musa, from the village of al-Ka', which was under the administration of Ba'albakk, 
in the time of the Chorepiscopus Musa, son of Tashlak. 

£»jl£ . . . fillip ^.IJ* *i»l ^ jUJ J-9- ^ jyxll ijl j* ]a^Ay> kJ j!i\ jjjl U>._y_ ^ill jj| ^j-L^ ~~,l 

*J.-^' t>* M t>.' cr - ^ Lr 5 " • • • V^' fV. v*^ • • • f^~" ^ (°' ^Jt^ j>*^J **~ r iUnJ'j *JVI &- &• 
.y ->y&i \Jb\ o* 3^ <y. { ifr c9- , ^" , ( s * c ) cjjs^' r 1 . 1 ^ v^j • • • f^'j ^ ^^ o* g}sl' o>-JI 

Ff. 2890-2900 were copied by the monk Simon, bishop of Saidnaye. This information is 
found in a mixed colophon in Syriac and Arabic on fol. 2900. 

Clear and bold Melchite hand. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. Geo- 
metrical patterns separate the different tunes. 

On fol. 20 the MS. is marked in Arabic as a waqfoi the Church of our Lady, and fol. 2886 is 
almost wholly occupied with an inscription to the effect that the priest Simon, from the village of 
Ma'runiyah, bought the MS. and bequeathed it to the Church of our Lady in the fortified village 
of Saidnaya. The form of bequest was written in the presence of Kir-Athanasius, bishop of 
Saidnaya, in the year 7094 x (evidently of the Creation, corresponding to a.d. 1586). 

j^. ;xJl It- U : i$3 (sic) fi l»1 & x y, ^i|| u 3jM IJ p ^U- or J\ iJjUl v L$3l II* tfj #| 
fjA \jm xjS . . . ^dl ^IX ;o r Jl \1^ <^ j^ AZ L.^ jJ r U5_5 dlli \L> jL» oij ; J>M JI Uju, 

1 Written in Coptic numerals. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 185 

For the right understanding of the text of the present MS., it will be useful to write a few 
words about the order of the prayers in the Melchite Church : 

(1) Monday is devoted to the angels and penitence, Tuesday to John the Baptist, Wednesday 
and Friday to the Holy Cross, Thursday 1 to the Apostles, and Saturday 2 to the dead. 

(2) The prayers are divided into the following sections : 

(a) The Jjfjo/ pojl), or Odes, which are nine in number, and are sung to one tune. A 

single piece of an Ode is called u p csofr^j (iSy^)- The last, or ninth Ode, is devoted 
to the Virgin. 

(b) The j.vimKo (\ »,..>), or Cathisma, which is recited after the 3rd and 4th Odes in all the 

festivals which have a Canon composed of ten Odes. The Cathisma is followed by a 
jvr&lXs , which is always devoted to the Virgin. 

(c) The ^o,jao (Jl-u»), which is recited between the 6th and the 7th Odes, and which is 

devoted to the festival or the saint of the day. 

(d) The . moq . ma/ (<j-y~. 5*1), called in our day, ExaposteilaHa, and in Arabic, ^jyiSl , which 

is composed of two or three pieces, the third of which is always devoted to the Virgin. 



Mingana Syriac 618 

305 x 207 mm. 121 leaves of two columns. Twenty-two lines to the column. 
The Service-Book and Horologium of the Melchite Church called ^y_j , for special days and 
Sundays extending from Palm Sunday to Pentecost. Incomplete at the end. 

The rubrics and explanatory clauses are in Arabic, but all the prayers and their titles are in 
Syriac. From the wording of some rubrics we may infer that the prayers found in the volume 
were recited mostly by monks in their monasteries. 

The time of the year included in the volume embraces : 

[a) Ff . 1-73& : The Holy Week, or from Palm Sunday to Easter Day. 

(b) Ff. 74^-91^ : Low Sunday, called " New Sunday " or " The Sunday of the Benediction 

of Bread " (the word aghrabinyah means " benediction of bread "). 

1 In our days the Melchites devote Thursday to the Apostles and to St. Nicholas. 

* The Melchites of our days devote Saturday not only to the dead, but also to the Apostles, martyrs and saints. 



Z 86 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

(c) Ff. 920-1056 : The second Sunday after Easter, known as " The Sunday of the Women 
who brought Spices, and of Joseph of Arimathea." 

£*o ppck ao^ ju. U>VI ;AJS" LJi ;^ .wi-^j y^JJi o**U J^j-Ji £*d\ >**> JWl. ^Vl 

At the end it is stated that all the days included between this Sunday and Whit 
Sunday have the same prayers. 

{d) Ff. 1060-1136 : The third Sunday of Pentecost, called " The Sunday of the Paralytic." 

.fJLO J up flk - . l ! ! ^O^d 

(e) Ff. 1136-1216 : The night of Wednesday, the middle of the fifty days from Easter to 
Pentecost. 

.j_.po y K i ^^ _^»I>JI U-mtUII jyr LJI iy^ .ju-J-l ^ui LjVI <L) 

As stated above, the MS. is incomplete at the end. 

The saints whose names are mentioned as the authors of some Canons are : 

(a) Ff. 46, 22a, 570, 586 : St. Cosmas, probably Cosmas the Elder, monk of St. Saba, who 

died about A.D. 750 (J^ojod Mt l^a*xo). 

(b) Fol. 566 : St. Mark, probably Mark Diadochus, from Epirus, who nourished in a.d. 457 

.(wfioax>po Jja/j |. . VU £ d ) 

(c) Fol. 656 : St. John of Damascus (ojccLiojj ^x-o- Jja/> J^cuuqd) 

(d) Fol. 940 : St. Andreus, probably Andrew of Crete (ocoo/j^j/ J-a/j J^cu^d) 

No date. Clear Melchite hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. Geometrical patterns 
separate the main divisions. 

Mingana Syriac 619 
275 x 183. 346 leaves of two columns. Twenty-three lines to the column. 

. A 

Ff . 1-3346 : The service-book for Sundays and week-days after Easter, according to the 
Melchite Church. 

.aJIjJIi ju&Jl A$Jb I^iuiLIj <*Li!l il>-l ol_jL- 

Two leaves are missing at the beginning. 

The general rubrics are in Arabic, but the names of the prayers and the prayers themselves 
are in Syriac. 

Ff .1-490 : First tune. 

Ff . 496-916 : Second tune. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 187 

Ff. 9i&-i28# : Third tune. 
Ff. 1286-167& : Fourth tune. 
Ff. 167&-208& : Fifth tune. 
Ff. 2oga-2$ob : Sixth tune. 
Ff. 2^ob-28ga : Seventh tune. 

Ff. 2896-3346 : Eighth tune, with the following subscription : jc l*Uly, jU-VI jUl cJ? 
,jjl\ A*<Je 4)1 J-j . . . Cjv*1 c>' J^J £— O-Jj isJ &*> v^u J ^ > J L " 411 6j- JUflij c^ 1 

The Fathers mentioned as the authors of some Canons are : St. John (, 1 *-- J^J), probably 
St. John of Damascus (ff. la, 55a, 1726), and St. Cosmas (J*>/aa J-aJ), probably Cosmas the Elder, 
monk of St. Saba, who died about a.d. 750 (ff. ib, 556, 2556). 

B 

Ff - 334^~345« : The eleven lessons from the Gospels which are read on Sunday mornings 
before the Canons. The Gospels are in Syriac, and are accompanied by prayers, also in Syriac. 

4!i Jjl jyUJI JJ o^VI f _y. j>~. Ij> b J&\ iyj* jb-VI J^UI v ;£ aJUI o^all juI-j 4JI j r , ^jjJ 

C 

Ff . 3456-363 • The Canons and other prayers to a patron saint, be he a martyr, an apostle, 
a prophet, a bishop, or an angel. 

Only small fragments are left of ff. 347-363, and these have not been numbered. The com- 
plete text breaks off at the end of fol. 346ft. 

No date. Written in a clear Melchite hand of about a.d. 1490. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated. Fairly broad margins. Geometrical patterns separate the different tunes and the 
other minor divisions of the MS. 



Mingana Syriac 620 

162 x no mm. 169 leaves. Generally sixteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. 1-52 : A collection of fourteen pious anecdotes. In Garshiini. 



188 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

The first anecdote deals with an Indian girl, aged 16, whose soul was lost in 1590 because she 
did not declare her sin in confession to her spiritual Father. 

Begins (fol. lb) : Kao/ JogJJ o\icr> pu^ &tsjx> pai» ^3 Ki^ »JJoi t-aa ^a^K* ^oJJ/ \ a^Ss 

B 

Ff. 52&-140& : An extensive collection of miracles performed by the Virgin Mary. Headed 
in Arabic. 

The first miracle was performed in the time of the Caliph Ma'mim. 

c 

Ff. i4oi-i55« : The story of St. Matthias and the miracle which the Virgin Mary performed 
for him. 

In the title, Matthias is changed into Matthew the Evangelist, but in the body of the text the 
name is always Matthias. 

The story is more or less similar to that found in Mingana Syriac 127, ff. 586-820, etc. 

Begins : .^oJLcolSJ^ _^^iJJ/ w**oo ^io op ,m\ JLooSs (oitouj ~KSs. oi-aa^. ^aa ) ~/o 

•t-ito ^(j ou) "^fto oi<ao/ J-» 
D 

Ff . 1550-1696 : The history of SS. Barbara and Juliana. 
s^^ajjoSss ^a yja© .JjL^io ^©oti/c^j o*j)-Aa^ JoiKa-^Jo oi»)-»t-a ipo c* m , ? n^S 01*0 . . . 

The name of the copyist of the MS. is (fol. 1696) the priest-monk Isaac from Alkosh, who 
wrote it for his own benefit and that of his brothers Michael and Nona (a corruption of 
Yaunan = Jonah). 

^ ;l)jo op )^xjj |^aa^ JUH 1 n ... m .,.; )ju»juo jU^o tS^J* (ipojij Jjo, J^fco csKd!/ 

.J£u}L3 Jjcuo " ^v ■ I 'Vu. V ) ^oicLm{o 001 wo|Ci\ no n> 

No date. Written in a clear and vowelled East Syrian hand of about a.d. 1780. Headings 
in red. In the first part the headings are in Estrangela characters. 

Mingana Syriac 621 

160 x no mm. 172 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

A prayer-book for the use of the West Syrians who had joined the Roman Church. Some 
prayers are in Syriac, but the majority are in Garshuni. Incomplete at the beginning and at 
the end. 



MINGANA COLLECTION 189 

Some of the prayers are translated from Latin (called in the MS. "the Frankish language "). 

The prayers date from the beginning of the Roman propaganda among West Syrians, when 
the Roman influence had not yet become predominant, as some of the prayers are attributed to 
Philoxenus of Mebbug. 

Three leaves are missing at the beginning, six between if. 4-5, two between ff . 26-27, and one 
between ff. 84-85. The number of leaves missing at the end is unknown. 

We will give the list of the important prayers, with the names of the saints to whom they are 
attributed : 

Fol. ya: St. Simeon the Stylite. 

Ff. 246-125^ contain prayers for the days of the week. 

Fol. 246 : Athanasius " the Apostle," probably Athanasius of Alexandria. Prayer for 
Monday. 

Fol. 44 b : St. Ephrem the Syrian, Prayer for Tuesday. 

Fol. 59a : St. Ephrem the Syrian. Prayer for Wednesday. 

Fol. y6b : The " spiritual old man," an epithet generally applied to John Saba. Prayer for 
Thursday. 

Fol. 100b : An anonymous prayer for Friday, but from the word mimar used in the heading 
we presume that the author was St. Ephrem. 

Fol. 116& : An anonymous prayer for Saturday, said to be taken from Coptic. 

Ff. 1250-172& contain miscellaneous prayers and supplications, not ior the days of the week. 
Ff. r 25^-1400 : The Litany of the Virgin, and some other prayers also to the Virgin. Trans- 
lated from Latin. 

Fol. 1456 : The prayer of the Abbot Isaiah, probably Isaiah of Scete. 

Fol. 1480 : The prayer of the Abbot Sheniidi. 

Fol. 1496 : The prayer of Philoxenus of Mebbug. 

Fol. 150& : The prayer of St. Athanasius. 

Ff. 151^-153^ : Two prayers by Gregory Nazianzen. 

Fol. 153a : Another prayer by Philoxenus of Mebbug. 

Fol. 154a : The prayer of Abraham Kindonaya. 

Fol. 155a : Another prayer by Abbot Isaiah. 

Fol. 159ft • The prayer of St. Augustine (^-^ja^/ jj^o), which involves plenary indulgence. 

Ff. 1646-1726 contain the prayer for the dying, headed : ^0 *^P c^a^CSs 01501 

.IJ^dKjl*^ jJ,m. t nVo j/o^JJ/ v m ., ft ^ ^o^o o&JI ^ ^o ^JL***^ ~^t»JIJ 

No date. Clear and slightly bold West Syrian hand of about a.d. 1730. Headings in red. 
Well rubricated. 

On the fly-leaf at the end is an inscription by an owner Behnam (written Behnan) son of 
George. 



190 SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

Mingana Syriac 622 

163 x 109 mm. 127 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The Psalter according to the West Syrian Church. Some leaves are missing at the beginning, 
which contained the first seventeen Psalms. 

Every verse is separated in the middle by the letter Hd, which stands for " Hallelujah." 
Some leaves are damaged, though the writing is legible, and the edges of a few others are 
renovated. The uncanonical 151st Psalm is found at the end. 

Dated in an Arabic colophon (fol. 127b) 2013 of the Greeks (a.d. 1702), and written in the 
monastery of St. Matthew (Shaikh Matti) by the deacon Ibrahim, son of the deacon Khidr, son 
of the priest Abraham 'Akrawi : x 

S-* J !>*] &3 6^' **- jf-Vl [. . .] J «il!Sj ^IjJI j» y» ^JJI J&\ \j+ Jl 3 J^ jj 

Clear and handsome West Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

On the fly-leaf at the end is an inscription by an owner, Joseph, son of the priest Ablahad 
(a corruption of 'Abd al-Ahad = Dominic), son of the priest Joseph Si'irti, i.e. from the town of 
Si'irt, or Seert. 



1 The left-hand side of the page containing the colophon, which was torn in the middle, has been covered over by 
a pidce of paper, and this has rendered illegible the last words of the lines. 



GENERAL INDEX 



GENERAL INDEX 



A 

'Abd ad-Daim, 171. 
'Abd al-Ahad, son of Salim, 170. 
'Abd al-Fattah 'Atai, 153. 
'Abd an-Nur (bishop in 1728), 172. 
'Abdallah b. Fag!l a. Fath b. 'Abdallah Matran, 18. 
'Abdallah b. Mansiir, 139. 
'Abdallah b. Zakhir, 93. 
'Abdallah (owner), 9. 
'Abdallah (priest at Mosul in 1757), 174. 
'Abdisho' (E.S. Metropolitan of Nisibin and Ar- 
menia, d. 1318), 2, 6. 
Abraham Kindonaya, 189. 
Abraham (priest-monk, translator), 113. 
Abram (Abbot), 101. 
Abyari, Fa^l-Allah, 158. 
Abyssinians, 64, 150. 
Acta Thomae, 121, 123. 
Adam, 24, 86, 88. 
Afghanistan, 145. 
Africa, 150. 
Agaius (abbot), 101. 
Agapius, St. (martyr), 36. 
Agatha, St., 36. 
Agathon (abbot), 10 1. 
Aha (E.S. monk), 7. 
Ahmad (Sultan of Constantinople), 156. 
Almd'emmeh, St., 178. 
'Akkar (district of Syria), 35. 

Aleppo, 12, 87, 92, 95, 97. 99» *39» *54- 

Alexander (bishop of Anwatij), 79. 

Alexander (correspondent of Archaeus of Lepatin), 

44. 
Alexander of Alexandria : 

Discourse on the Trisagion, 45. 
Alexander, St. (martyr), 36. 

Alexandria, 8, 14, 28, 50, 124, 130, 133, 142, 150. 
Alexius, St., 37. 
Alkosh (village), 97, 155, 188. 
Alonius (abbot), 10 1. 
Alwah (town), 123, 130. 



Ambrose of Milan : 

On the Incarnation, 73. 
'Amid (Ibn), George, 150. 
Amidi, 'Abd an-Nur (monk in 1730), 18. 
Ammon of Nitria (abbot), 10 1. 
Ammonas, or Ammonus (abbot), 101. 
Ammonathus (abbot), 101. 
Ammonian Sections, 20. 
Amphilochius of Iconium : 

Commentary on John, 73. 

Correspondent of Basil of Caesarea, 45. 
Ananiel (archangel), 23. 
Anastasius (bishop of Mount Sinai), 68, 69. 

Commentary on Psalm vi, 59. 

On demon mentioned in Job, 67. 
Anatolius (bishop of Rome), 47. 
Anatolius (notary), 139. 
Ancyra (town), 161. 
Andrew (abbot), 101. 
Andrew of Crete, 84, 186. 
Andrew, St., 177. 
Andrew, son of George (priest-copyist in 183 1), 

35- 

Andronicus, 61. 

Anphi, or Apos (abbot), 101. 

Antioch, 17; 18, 88, 142. 

Called " Ignorant City," 125, 131. 
Antiochus (monk), 33, 66. 
Antiochus (pagan correspondent of Athanasius of 

Alexandria), 72, 81. 
Antonelli, 15. 

Antony (ascetic of sixth century), 88. 
Antony, St., 66, 91, 101, 146, 157. 
Antony, son of Ilyas Sakilarius, 34. 
Antony, son of Joseph Daifar (copyist), 163. 
Apamea (district), 19. 
Aphadocia, St. (nun), 36. 
Aphcasantius, St., 36. 
Aphicus (ascetic), 88. 
Apollo (abbot), 101. 
Apotropius, St. (martyr), 36. 
Arakhant (village), 65. 



13 



194 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



Archaeus of Lepatin : Letter to Alexander, 44. 

Archelides, son of Hanna (deacon in 1822), 171. 

Archippus the Apostle, St., 36. 

Areus (abbot), 101. 

Arians, 56. 

Armenia and Armenians, 47, 64, 149. 

Arsenius (abbot), 101. 

Asila (abbot), 101. 

Asian (bishop in 1728), 172. 

'Assal (Ibn), Mu'taman a. Fadl, 78-79, 80. 

'Assal (Ibn), Sail abu Fada'il, 106, 107. 

Assemani, 66, 156. 

Astat, or Eustathius, 77. 

Astronomy, 33, 88, 151-153- 

Asyut, 21. 

'Ata. Allah (monk in 1555), 171. 

Athanasius b. Michael Mukhalla', 89, 92. 

Athanasius (bishop of Perrha), 86. 

Athanasius (bishop of SaidnayS), 184. 

Athanasius IV Dabbas (Greek Patriarch of Antioch, 

d. 1724), 22, 70. 
Athanasius IV (Greek Patriarch of Jerusalem), 

82-83. 
Athanasius of Alexandria : 

Against Apollinarius, 72. 

Answer to Antiochus, 72. 

Commentary on Psalms, 14. 

Letter to Epictetus, 45. 

Letter to Marcellus, on the Psalms, 13. 

On Body and Soul, 45. 

On Holy Trinity, and Economy of our Lord, 

45- 

On Incarnation, 45, 72. 

On Trinity, against the Arians, 45. 

Orationes IV contra Arianos, 56. 

Prayers, 189. 

Profession of Faith, 45, 72. 

Questions and Answers, 81. 

Twelve points to Emperor Constantius, 45. 
Athanasius of Antioch : Letter to Philotheus of 

Alexandria, 53. 
Athanasius Thomas (bishop of Mosul), 178, 180. 
Atticus of Constantinople : Homily on Nativity, 

44. 
Audo (see Joseph). 
Augustine, St. : 

On the Five Loaves, 73. 

Prayer by, 189. 
'Azar (bishop in 1728), 172. 
'Aziz b. Sabta (Patriarch of Tur 'Abdin), 181. 



B 

Ba'albakk, 184. 

Babai bar Nsibnaye, n. 

Babai the Great, n. 

Babylon, 24, 26. 

Babylon (town in Egypt), 30. 

Baghdad, 22. 

Bahri (Ibn), Tsa b. a. Tahir b. a. Nasr (copyist), 

1-2. 
Ballat, son of Ibrahim (priest-copyist), 105. 
Bandar-' Abbas, 156. 
Barakat, abu'l, 15, 77. 
Barhebraeus, 180. 

Profession of Faith, 182. 
Barsadagis (correspondent of Hippolytus of Rome), 

46. 
Barsamya (bishop of Edessa), 138. 
Barsanuphius, St., 67, 69. 
Bartholomew, St., 176. 
Basil (bishop), 102. 
Basil (Chaldean bishop in 1723), 154. 
Basil Asmar (bishop), 97. 
Basil Gorgis (George) of Aleppo (bishop in 1728), 

172. 
Basil Ni'mat Allah (Maphrian), 171, 172. 
Basil of Antioch : Letter to Cosmas of Alexandria, 

52. 
Basil of Caesarea, St. : 

Against Eunomius, 45, 73. 

Canons, 46, 150. 

Commentary on Isaiah, 67. 

Commentary on a sentence of Solomon, 46. 

Discourses, 73. 

Letter to Amphilochius, 45. 

Letter to Julian the Apostate, 160. 

Liturgy, 29, 38. 

Prayers, 34. 

Profession of Faith in the Trinity, 46. 

Questions and Answers, 84. 
Basil Shim'un (Simon) of Tur' Abdin, or Turani 

(W. S. Maphrian), 172. 
Basil the Confessor, St., 36. 
Basileus, St. (bishop of Sharsuna), 36. 
Basiliscus, St. (martyr), 36. 
Basilius of Angora, St. (priest and martyr), 37. 
Baumstark, A., 183. 
Bedjan, P., 139. 

Behnam, son of George (owner), 189. 
Behnam Tha'laban (priest), 182. 
Benedictus, St. (monk), 36. 



GENERAL INDEX 



195 



Benjamin (abbot), 102. 

Benjamin of Alexandria : Heretistica, 52. 

Bessarion (abbot), 102. 

Beyrout, 92. 

Bible : 

Old Testament. 

Genesis, 1, 7, 26, 119. 

Exodus, 1, 8, 27. 

Leviticus, 1, 8. 

Numbers, 2, 8, 27. 

Deuteronomy, 2, 8. 

Joshua, 9, 27. 

Judges, 9. 

Ruth, 9. 

1 Samuel, 9. 

2 Samuel, 10, 27. 

1 Kings, 10. 

2 Kings, 10. 

1 Chronicles, 10, 27. 

2 Chronicles, 10, 27. 

Psalms, 8, II, 12, 13, I4> i 8 " 20 ' 26 " 2 7> 26 > 

29, 86, 159. 190- 
Isaiah, 27, 170. 
Ezekiel, 27. 
Daniel, 119, 170. 
Old Testament Apocrypha. 
Book of Wisdom, 170. 
Song of the Three Children, 11, 12, 13, 3 2 - 
Uncanonical 151st Psalm, 8, 12, 14, 26, 
190. 
New Testament. 

Four Gospels, 2, 7, 8, 10, 27, 28. 
Matthew, 2, 7, 8, 10, 15, 20, 21, 27. 
Mark, 2, 7, 8, 10, 20, 28. 
Luke, 2, 7, 8, 10, 20, 28. 
John, 2, 7, 9, 10, 17, 20, 28. 
Acts, 27. 

Catholic Epistles, 28. 
Pauline Epistles, 10, 17, 22, 27, 28. 
James, 27. 
Revelation, 27, 84. 
New Testament Apocrypha (see under separate 
names). 
Bino (village), 40. 
Bisharah Salib (owner), 113. 
Black Mountain, 66. 
Bonnet, M., 122. 
Book of Mysteries, 86. 
Breviaries (see Service-books). 
Buktur, or Bacterius (Victor), 181. 
Byzantium, 88. 



C 



Caesarius (brother of Gregory Nazianzen), 72. 
Calendars, ecclesiastical, I5I-I53- 
Coptic, 10, 29, 149- 
East Syrian, 3. 
Greek Orthodox, 22, 35. 
Greek Uniate, 31, 32, 33"35> 4<>- 
Latin, 41. 
West Syrian, 172. 
Callinicus, St. (martyr), 36. 
Canons, ecclesiastical : 

of the Apostles, 43, 68, 86, 150. 
of Chalcedon, 68. 
of Clement, 42, 43. 
of Council of Carthage, 68. 
of Council of Gangra, 68. 
of Councils of Constantinople, 63, 67, 68. 
of Hippolytus, 150. 
of St. Basil, 150. 
of St. Paul, 43. 
of Seventh Council, 67. 
of Sixth Council, 67. 
Canons from E.S. Psalter, 12. 
Canons of Eusebius, 20. 
Canticles : 

Gloria, 11. 

Prayer of Hezekiah, 8. 

Prayer of Simeon (Nunc dimittis), 8. 

Song of Habakkuk, 8, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Song of Hannah, 8, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Song of Isaiah, 8, 11, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Song of Jonah, 8, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Songs of Moses, 8, 11, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Song of the Blessed Virgin [Magnificat), 8, 

12, 13- 

Song of the Three Children, 11, 12, 13, 3 2 - 

Song of Zacharias, 8, 12. 
Capitonus, St. (martyr), 36. 
Cappadocia, 160. 
Capucius, 99. 

Carinus, or Cronius (abbot), 103. 
Carmel, 164. 
Carthage, 121. 
Cassianus (abbot), 36, 103. 

Collationes, 127, 132. 
Catherine, St., 91. 
Cave (historian), 107. 
Cephalonia (island), 94. 
Chaldean, 119. 
Charalampius the Thaumaturge, St., 36. 



196 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



Charmes, Thomas de (Capucin Father), 99. 
Cheikho, L., 15, 66, 71, 81, 92, 114, 116, 143, 154. 
Cheiremon (abbot), 104. 
Christodoms (bishop of Anwatij), 79. 
Christodolus of Alexandria : 
Heretistica, 54. 

Letter to John of Antioch, 54. 
Christodolus of 'Anjirah, 147. 
Christology, 135. 

Chronological tables, 25, 149-150, 152. 
Chronology, treatises on, 33, 172. 
Chrysanthus, St. (martyr), 37. 
Chumah (abbot), 104. 
Church of : 

Abu Kir and John, SS., 43. 

Apostles, the, 67. 

Barbara and Juliana, SS., 43. 

Curius, St., see Abu Kir. 

Cyprian and Justin, SS., 161. 

Cyrus, St., see Abu Kir. 

Elijah of Asbit, St., 136. 

Forty Martyrs, the, 129, 170. 

George the Martyr, St., at Gazarta, 6. 

Mercurius, St., see Abu Kir. 

Our Lady at Mosul, 180. 

Our Lady at Saidnaye\ 184. 

Our Lady in Egypt, 43. 

Thomas, St., 180. 
Civil Laws, 68. 

Cledonius (correspondent of Gregory Nazianzen), 48. 
Clement XI (Pope), 156. 
Clement of Rome, 42, 43, 86. 

Apostolic Constitutions, 42-43. 

Canons, 42, 43. 

Epistles, 84. 
Conon, St. (martyr), 36. 
Constantine Palaiologus, 88. 
Constantine, son of David (teacher), 146. 
Constantine the Great, 87, 88, 142. 
Constantinople, 87, 105, 139, 149. 
Constantius (Emperor), 45, 133. 
Convent of : 

Abu Makar, 65. 

Antony, St., 79, 80. 

Behnam, St., and his sister Sarah, 179. 

Elias, St., 164. 

Elijah, St., 105. 

Eusebius (Mar), 19. 

George of Tura, St., 28. 

Isaiah, St., 118, 164. 

John, St., 164. 



Convent of (continued): — 

John the Dwarf, 115. 

Matti, Shaikh, 182, 190. 

Mercurius abu Saifain, St., 14. 

Mount Sinai, 12, 92, 109, 122, 129, 160, 161. 

Muharrak, 65. 

Natif, 170. 

Paul, or Paula, abbot, 19, 56, 77, 79, 8l - 

Rabban Hormizd, 155. 

Ras-Aktas, 158. 

Redeemer, the, 100. 

Saba, St., 37, 66. 

Simeon Thaumaturgus, St., 66. 

Virgin, the, in Babylon, 30. 

Za'faran, 82, 172. 
Copres (abbot), 103. 

Coptic chronology and dates, 10, 14, 16, 19, 21, 25, 
28, 30, 33. 43, 56, 65, 77, 79, 81, 98, 106, 
108, 113, 151. 
Coptic Church, 10, 26, 29, 44. 
Coptic language, 24, 26-29, 29-30, 189. 
Coptic numerals, 10, 15, 17, 20, 21, 29, 54, 55, 56, 

76, 77, 80, in, 113, 116, 150-151, 184. 
Copts, 9, 64, 98. 
Cosmas of Alexandria : 

Letter to Basil of Antioch, 52. 

Letter to John of Antioch, 52. 
Cosmas the Elder, 186, 187. 
Councils : 

Seventh, 67. 

Sixth, 67. 

Of Carthage, 68. 

Of Chalcedon, 63, 68, 72. 

Of Constantinople, 63, 67, 68, 

Of Ephesus, 55. 

Of Florence, 74, 84. 

Of Gangra, 68. 
Creation, dates calculated from, 31, 63, 83, 105, 

i34» 139- 
Cronius, see Carinus. 
Cross, Holy, invention of, 121. 
Cyprus, 24, 86, 89. 
Cyriacus of Antioch : Letter to Mark of Alexandria, 

52. 
Cyril (Coptic Patriarch in 1899), 28. 
Cyril Elias (bishop), 182. 
Cyril of Alexandria : 

Against Apollinarius, 56. 

Against Nestorius, 50. 

Anathemas, 55, 64, 76, 80. 

Book of Questions, 51. 



GENERAL INDEX 



197 



Cyril of Alexandria {continued) : — 

Commentary on First Epistle to Corinthians, 

50. 
Commentary on Gospels, 170. 
Dialogues with Hermias, 49. 
Explanation of the Mystery of Christ, against 

Nestorius, 51. 
Letter to Acacius of Melitene, 5°- 
Letter to Acacius of Scythopolis, 50. 
Letter to Eulogius, 50. 
Letters to John of Antioch, 49, 5°. 7 2 - 
Letter to monks about Virgin Theotokos, 49. 
Letter to Nestorius, 50, 72. 
Letter to Oriental bishops, 50 • 
Letter to pious emperors, 51, 55- 
Letter to Severus, 49. 
Letters to Succensus, 51, 7 2 - 
Letter to Synod of Egyptian bishops, against 

Nestorius, 50. 

Letter to Theodosius, 72. 

On Faith, 49- 

On the circumcision of our Lord, 59. 

On the Incarnation of the Word, 50 • 

On the Trinity, 49. 

On the Unity of Christ, 50, 5*- 

Profession of Faith, 49, 5°- 

Scholia, 51. 

Thesaurus, 50, 56. 
Cyril of Jerusalem, St., 37. 
Cyril, St. (deacon and martyr), 37. 
Cyrus, Cyrius, or Curius, St., 66. 
Cyrus of Alexandria (abbot), 103. 



D 



Dabbas, see Athanasius IV. 
Dadisho (Ibn) (translator), 3. 
Dalai (daughter of Joachim), 26. 
Damascus, 17, 92, 161. 
Daniel (abbot), 102. 
Daniel b. Hattab, 81. 
Daniel Khalil (monk), 100. 
Daniel of Salah : 

Commentary on Psalms, 18. 

Epilogue on commentary on Psalms, 19. 

Letter to Abbot John, 18. 
Daniel of Telle, 19. 
Daria, St. (martyr), 37. 
David (ascetic), 88. 
David bar Paulus, 181. 



David (Psalmist), 12. 

David, son of Tsa Hum, 35. 

David, son of Michael (owner in i860), 89. 

David the Prophet, 138. 

Demetrius (Patriarch of Alexandria), 149-151. 

Diadochus (bishop of Photice) : Capita on Spiritual 

Knowledge, 107. 
Dibsi, Ya'kub, 159. 
Didascalia, 42, 150. 
Dionysius of Antioch : 

Letter to Menus of Alexandria, 53. 

Letter to Michael of Alexandria, 52. 

Letter to Sanutius of Alexandria, 54. 
Dionysius the Areopagite : Letter to Timothy, 44, 

128. 
Dionysius Barsalibi, 167, 169. 
Dionysius Behnam (bishop), 182. 
Dionysius of Cyprus, 46, 53. 
Diophysites, see Nestorians. 
Dioscorus (abbot), 102. 
Dioscorus of Alexandria, 86, 182. 
Discourses (see Homilies). 
Drawings and geometrical patterns, 28, 31, 32, 34, 

39, 61, 66, 75, 96, 122, 184, 186, 187. 
Drusiana, 61. 
Dupont, Louis, 95, 118. 



E 



Echoniah (Jeconiah ?), 26. 
Edessa, mountain of, 24. 
Edessa (town), 138. 
Egypt, 8, 122. 

Arab invasion of, 26. 
Elias b. Fakhr Tarabulusi, 92. 
Elijah (abbot), 102. 

Elijah (ascetic of the sixth century), 88. 
Elijah (bishop of Nisibin), 82. 
Elijah (E.S. Patriarch, d. 1617), 155- . vN 

Elijah XII., 'Abbu'l-Yaunan (Chaldean Patriarch), 

155- 
Elijah Dinha (E.S. Patriarch), i54> J 55- 
Elijah John (E.S. Patriarch, d. 1700), 155- 
Elijah Marogln (E.S. Patriarch), 154. J 55- 
Elijah Munyati (bishop of Kalavryta), 94- 
Elijah of Nisibin, 181. 

Elijah Shim'un (E.S. Patriarch, d. 1660), 155- 
Elijah, son of Musa, 171. 
Elijah, the Seven Weeks of, 6. 
Epictetus (bishop of Corinth), 45- 



198 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



Epiphanius of Cyprus, 102, 167. 

Ancoratus, 48, 73. 

Discourses on the Virgin, 121, 138. 

Hexaemeron, 23. 

On Pseudo -Apostles, 68. 

On the Passover, 150. 

Twelve Precious Stones, 48. 
Ephrem (Patriarch of Jerusalem), 89. 
Ephrem, St. (martyr), 36. 
Ephrem Syrus, St. : 

Commentary on the Pearl, 47. 

Hymns, n. 

On Asceticism, 58. 

On Construction of the human body, 174. 

On Demon and Death, 58. 

On Prophet Elijah, 168. 

On Repentance, 58. 

On Spiritual struggle, 57. 

On Transfiguration, 60, 73. 

On the Virgin, 47. 

On Wine, 174. 

Penetential and parenetic discourses, 57, 106, 
126, 132. 

Poetical works, extensive collection of, 178- 
180. 

Prayers, 33, 189. 
Ephremius of Antioch, 88. 
Ephrodisianus the Persian, 138. 
Erivan, 156. 

Ermelus (name given to St. Paul), 131. 
Estrangela characters, 22. 
Eucharistus the Layman, St., 102. 
Euchesius, St. (martyr), 36. 
Euchologion, see Synaxarium. 
Eudaminus (abbot), 102. 
Eugenius, St. (martyr), 36. 
Euladius, St., 102. 
Eulogius (priest), 102. 
Eunomius, 45. 
Euphistrathius, 33. 
Euphranius, St., 102. 

Euphrasius (archbishop of the Armenians), 47. 
Euprasius, or Euphraxius, 104. 
Euphrates (river), 86. 
Eusebian Canons, 20. 
Eusebius of Caesarea, 169. 
Eustathius (bishop of Beyrout), 86. 
Euthalius of Rome: Anathemas, 55. 
Eutharius, St., 36. 
Evagrius (abbot), 102. 
Ezra, 23. 



Fabricius (historian), 107. 

Fatfl (Ibn), 'Abdallah, 72, 107. 

Farah, son of Masihah (monk-copyist in 1874), 30. 

Faraj, George (copyist), 40. 

Farhat, Gabriel, or Jibrail, or Germanus, 159, 162, 

163. 
Faris, son of Salim Antanios (reader), 129. 
Farj-Allah, son of John (owner), 28. 
Fars (Persian province), 145. 
Felix (abbot), 104. 

Felix of Rome : On Incarnation and Faith, 46. 
Francis (bishop), 175. 
Francois de Sales, 117. 
French language, 96. 
Fromage,. Pierre, 95, 97, 117, 147. 



Gabriel (archangel), 23, 37, 66. 

Gabriel (Coptic priest in i860), 17. 

Gabriel (priest in Mount Sinai), 92. 

Gabriel (village), 35. 

Gabriel b. Yaunan 'Ashikah (copyist), 71. 

Gabriel Marjan Tuwaisah, of Asyut (deacon in 

1796), 21. 
Gabriel of Alexandria : Letter to John of Antioch, 

52. 
Gabriel, son of Antony Babchi (owner), 96. 
Gallienus, 173. 
Garenthius (abbot), 102. 
Garshuni, 7, 9, 13, 25, 105, 172, 187, 188. 
Gazarta, or Jazirat Ibn 'Umar (town), 6, 82. 
Gelasius (abbot), 102. 
Gelasius, St. (bishop of Sebaste), 36. 
George (bishop of Nisibin), 11. 
George (priest -monk, copyist), 65. 
George Dakkur, 79. 
George Kumin, 152. 
George Nashuri, 147. 
George, son of Basil (reader), 129. 
George, son of Fattal (monk), 172. 
George, son of Peter (copyist), 146. 
George, son of Rizk, 19, 79, 81. 
George the Martyr, St., 5, 6, 157. 
Georgians, 88. 

Gerasimus of the Jordan, St., 36. 
Ghanun, son of Lamech, 25. 
Ghazzi (possibly Sulaiman Hasan Ghazzi), 158. 
Graf, G., 15, 57, 77, 107, 150. 



GENERAL INDEX 



199 



Greece, 80, 94. 
Greek Church : 

Melchite, 183-186. 
Orthodox, 22, 35-37- 
Uniate, 30, 32-35, 37> 39> 4°- 
Greek language, 9, 12, 17, 18, 25, 26, 38, 66, 85, 

89, 94, 101, 105, 122, 135, 136, 137- 
Greek uncial writing on vellum, 58, 59. 
Greeks, year of the, 62, 172, 174. *79. l82 - 
Gregory <Abd al-Ahad (bishop in 1728), 172. 
Gregory 'Abd al-Ghani (Patriarchal Vicar, and then 

Patriarch in 1570), 171. 
Gregory Barhebraeus, 167. 
Gregory Jerasimus (bishop), 129. 
Gregory Nazianzen, 68, 102. 
Anathemas, 55. 
Discourses, 72. 
Letter to Cledonius, 48. 
Mass of pre-sanctified Elements, 38. 
On Gregory Nyssen, 59. 
On the Nativity, 48. 
On the Son, 48. 
On the Trinity, 4& 
Prayers, 189. 
Vision attributed to, 24. 
Gregory Nyssen, 66, 169. 

Commentary on Philip., 4 6 - 
Commentary on Song of Solomon, 46. 
Ethical sayings, 161. 
On Baptism of our Lord, 46. 
On Penitence, 46. 
Questions and Answers, 84. 
Theological " Chapters," 64. 
Gregory of Cyprus, Vision of, 24. 
Gregory Pilate (Maphrian in I57 8 )> x 79- 
Gregory Shahin (bishop), 148-149. 
Gregory Thaumaturgus : 
On Faith, 45. 
On the Incarnation, 55. 
On the Trinity, 44- 
Twelve Chapters against Heretics, 81. 
Gregory the Illuminator, Prayer of, 45- 
Gurya (E.S. monk), 7. 

H 

Habib, called Abu Ra'itah (bishop of Tegrit), 55. 
liabib (Jesuit author), 41. 
Haddad (see Joseph). 
Hamadan (town), 145, i5°- 
IJanna (John), (priest), 134- 



Hanna Ghattas (owner), 116. 
Hannah, 92. 

Haraj b. Nicholas (copyist), 62. 
Harun ar-Rashid (Caliph), 134- 
Hawaii (owner), 116. 
Hazar (see 'Isa). 

Hazzaya, Joseph (E.S. monk), 7. 
Heraclius (abbot), 102. 
Hermias (see Cyril of Alexandria). 
Hibat-AUah Sadakah, 92. 
Hierapolis (town), 123, 130. 
Hilarion the Younger, St., 37. 
Hippolytus of Rome, 169. 
Anathemas, 55. 
Canons, 150. 
Encyclical letter, 46. 
Letter to Barsadagis, 46. 
Letter to Dionysius, 46, 53. 
Letter to Severianus of Gabala, 47. 
On the Incarnation, 46, 53. 
On the Unity of Christ, 46, 53. 
History (general) : 

From the time of Constantme, 142. 

Of Byzantine Emperors, 88. 

Of city of Mardin, 143. 

Of Councils, 76, 88, 142, 143- 

Of different sects and beliefs, 142. 

Of E.S. or Nestorian Patriarchs, 143. 

Of Greek and Roman religions in pagan times 

and in Christian times, 142-143- 
Of heretics, 63. 
Of Islamic dynasties, 87. 
Of the Jews, 24, 25, 142. 
Of the monastery of Mount Smai, 129, 133" 

134, 160, 161. 
Of the Sign of the Cross, 88. 
Of the World, 23, 24, 88, 135, J39« 
History of (see also under " Story of ) : 

Ahikar, Vizier of King Sennacherib, 132. 

Andrew, St., 126, 131. 

Antonius Kurashi, 134. I 35- 

Antony the Great, St., 146. 

Archelides, St., 146. 

Barbara and Juliana, SS., 188. 

Bartholomew, St., 123, 130. 

Blessed Virgin Mary, the, 138. 

Catherine, St., 133- 

Elijah the Prophet, 60. 

Eugenia, St., 126, 131. 

Euphrosyna, St., i35> 1 ^- 

Fathers of the Desert, 101. 



200 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



History of (continued) : — 
George, St., 147. 
Isidore of Alexandria, 114. 
James the Just, St., 124, 130. 
John Chrysostom, St., 88. 
John the Baptist, St., 65, 136, 137. 
John the Evangelist, St., 60, 61, 122, 130. 
Jude, St., 124, 130, 135- 
Julian the Physician, St., 60. 
Luke, St., 125, 130. 
Marina, or Mariana, St., 135. 
Marinus, St., 126, 131. 
Mark the Evangelist, St., 124, 130. 
Martianus, St., 136. 
Matthew, St., 123, 130, 188. 
Matthias, St., 125, 131, 188. 
Moses, 137. 

Moses the Ethiopian, abbot, 172. 
Nestorius, 87. 

Paul the Apostle, St., 65, 125, 131. 
Peter and Paul, SS., 125, 128, 131. 
Philip, St., 121, 123, 130. 
Philip of Alexandria, 126, 131. 
Seventy disciples, the, 65. 
Severianus, 138. 
Sharbail, 139. 
Simeon the Stylite, St., 137. 
Stephen Protomartyr, St., 136. 
Thomas, St., 121, 123, 130. 
Thuthayil and his sister Babai (same as 

Sharbail), 138. 
Twelve Apostles, the, 65, 130. 
Zacharias, St., 137. 
Homilies (anonymous), 60, 64, 65, 93, 99, 105, 133, 

136, 167, 182. 
Horns, or !Hims, 31, 137, 139. 
Hormiz the Persian (E.S. monk), 7. 
Horoscope, 120. 
Hymns by various writers, 11. 
Hypatius the Thaumaturge, St. (bishop of Gangra), 

37- 

I 

lbas (bishop of Edessa), 86. 

Ibrahim (copyist in 1728), 173. 

Ibrahim Dimitri, 117. 

Ibrahim Samnan (copyist), 113. 

Ibrahim, son of Khalil (deacon in 1874), 30. 

Ibrahim, son of Khidr (copyist in 1702), 190. 

Ibrahim, son of Wahbah Jacob (reader), 129. 

Ibrahim Sulaiman Najjar (copyist), 43. 



Ifrikiyah (town), 123, 130. 

Ignatius Abdallah (W.S. Patriarch in 1555), 170. 
Ignatius David Shah (W.S. Patriarch in i57 8 ). I 79- 
Ignatius (deacon-copyist in Mount Sinai in 1691), 12. 
Ignatius Ephrem I (W.S. Patriarch), 82, 144, 145, 

162, 178, 180. 
Ignatius George Shalhat (W.S. Patriarch), 148. 
Ignatius of Antioch : Quotations from letters, 44, 

54, 63, 68. 
Ignatius Peter III (W.S. Patriarch in 1888), 182. 
Ignatius Peter Jarwah (W.S. Uniat Patriarch in 

1826), 99. 
Ignatius Shukrallah (W.S. Patriarch), 172. 
Ilyas Khuri Stephen (copyist), 149. 
Ilyas Rizk Salamah (reader), 129. 
Ilyas Sakilarius (priest-copyist in 1828), 34. 
Ilyas, son of George Hazar (owner), 160. 
India, 123, 130, 174. 
Ink, how made, 148, 170. 
Irachus (abbot), 103. 
Irenaeus, 44. 
'Isa Harrini, 144. 
'Isa Hazar, 158. 
'Isa IJulu, father of David, 35. 
'Isa Khuri (copyist), 83. 
Isa, son of Kattit (owner), 134. 
Isaac (abbot), 66, 103. 
Isaac (copyist), 188. 
Isaac Jesse ar-Rakit (priest), 98. 
Isaac Khajimah (priest), 182. 
Isaac of Antioch, 67. 
Isaac of Nineveh (E.S. writer), 7, 107. 

Prayer, 115. 

Various works, 109-110. 
Isaac of Scete (abbot), 103. 
Isaac Shukr (copyist in 1831), 99. 
Isaac Shukri, of Mosul (teacher in 1836), 71. (Same 

as preceding ?) 
Isaiah of Scete (abbot), 189. 
Isfahan (town), 145. 
Isichius (ascetic), 88. • 
Isidora of Melitene, 169. 
Isidore (abbot), 102. 
Isidore al-Farami, St., 36. 
Isidore (of Pelusium ?), 67. 
Isidore the Priest, 103. 
Iskandar, Andrew, 156. 
Islam, see Muslims. 
Italian language, 97, 157. 
Italy, 84. 
Itfih, or Atfih (locality), 65. 



GENERAL INDEX 



201 



Iwani (John) Papa Ropolus (secretary of Greek 

Patriarch of Antioch in i860), 17. 
Iwannis (John) (bishop of Iloms), 82. 
Iwannis (John) Karas (bishop in 1728), 172. 



J 



Jabbur, son of Nicholas, 93- 
Jacob (abbot), 103. 
Jacob Na'mo (owner), 119. 
Jacob of Edessa, 119, 167. 
Jacob of Serug, 167, 169. 

On the good malefactor, 60. 
On the Nativity, 52. 
On the Passion, 52. 
Jacob, St. (bishop), 37- 
Jacob the Jew, 138. 
Jacob the Recluse (E.S. monk), 7. 
Jacobites, 64, 79. 
James, St., 142, 176. 
Jazirah (N. Mesopotamia), 124, 130. 
Jeremiah (prophet), 24. 
Jerome, St., 14. 
Jerusalem, 39, 86, 124, 130, 139- 

Destruction of, 25, 26, 43. 
Jesse Saba Faddul Sarraf (reader), 129. 
Jews, 24, 25, 62, 65, 77. 
Joachim (Basilian monk), 118. 
Joachim (Greek Patriarch in I55*)» l6l > 
Joachim, St., 92. 
Job (abbot), 101. 
Job Dahdal (owner), 37. 
John (abbot, disciple of Abbot Paul), 103. 
John (abbot of monastery of Mar Eusebius), 19. 
John (abbot of the " general monastery "), 102. 
John (ascetic), 88. 

John (bishop of Baralus) : Anathemas, 55- 
John (bishop of Salisbury in 1899), 28. 
John (disciple of Abbot Isaac), 66. 
John (monk, correspondent of St. Ephrem), 106. 
John (translator) : 

Deacon-monk, 113. 
Priest-monk, 138. 
John, or Yowannes (Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria 

in 1308), 28. 
John, or Yuhanna (spiritual son of the preceding 

Patriarch John), 28. 
John as-Sa'idi, son of Elias (deacon-copyist in 1707), 

24. 
John b. David (copyist), 65. 



John Chrysostom, St. : 

Commentary on Epistle to Colossians, 07. 
Commentary on Epistle to Ephesians, 49, 67. 
Commentary on Epistle to Hebrews, 17, 49- 
Commentary on Gospels, 60 , 170. 
Commentary on John, 17, 4 8 > 6 7- 
Commentary on Matthew, 15, 48. fi 7> 68 . °9« 
Commentary on Philemon, 68. 
Commentary on 46th Psalm, 48. 
Commentary on Second Epistle to Corinthians, 

49- 
Homilies, 15, 17. i«, °9> 7°- 

Liturgy, 38- 

On the Annunciation, 49. 
On the Ascension, 49. 
On the birth of John the Baptist, 137 • 
On the decollation of John the Baptist, 13O. 
On the Holy Spirit, 67, 161. 
On the Nativity, 48, 49. 
On the Passover, 150. 
On Penitence, 126. 
On Penitence and Asceticism, 131. 
On the Sacrament of Penitence and Confes- 
sion, 129. 
On Sin and Repentance, 59. 
On the Sunday of the deprivation of cheese, 60. 

Prayers, 33, 34- 
John Climacus, St., 37> 6 7- ° 8 - 

Scala Paradisi, 106, 109. 
John Musaddi of Aleppo, 172. 
John of Alexandria : 

Correspondent of Severus of Antioch, 52. 

Letter to Cyriacus of Antioch, 52. 
John of Antioch, 49, 50, 52, 54» 55- 

Letter to Christodolus of Alexandria, 54. 

Letter to Menas of Alexandria, 53. 

Letter to Zechariah of Alexandria, 53- 
John of Baith-Rabban, 11. 
John of Dalyatha, or John Saba (E.S. author), 114. 

Capita Scientiae, 108, no, 112, 113- 

Discourses, no, in, 113. 

Letter to his brother, 113. 

Mystical letters, 108, no, 112, 113. 

On love, mystery of next world, and union 
with God, 108. 

Prayers, 115, 189- 
John of Damascus, or Johannes Damascenus, St. : 

Canons, 186, 187. 

On Christian Faith, 71. 

On Heretics, 67. 

Prayers, 31, 33, 34- 



202 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



John of Jerusalem : On the Creed, 48. 

John of Scete (abbot), 103. « 

John of the Cells (abbot), 103. 

John Philoponus, or Grammaticus, 120. 

John Samin, 158. 

John, son of 'Abd al-Masih (copyist in 1578), 179. 

John, son of Ilyas, 156. 

John, son of 'Isa (translator), 183. 

John, son of Isho' (copyist), 96. 

John the Baptist, St., 3, 24, 36, 64, 65, 91, 136, 

137, 176. 
John the Dailamite, 109. 
John the Dwarf, 66, 102, 103, 115. 
John the Egyptian (E.S. monk), 7. 
John the Evangelist, St., 64, 91, 176. 
John the Persian (abbot), 103. 
John the Servant (abbot), 103. 
John 'Uwaisat (owner), 63. 
Jonas (martyr), 37. 
Joseph (ascetic), 88. 

Joseph II (Chaldean Patriarch, d. 1714), 96, 157. 
Joseph III (Chaldean Patriarch), 154. 
Joseph (Jewish doctor), 135. 
Joseph Audo (Chaldean Patriarch in 1866), 22. 
Joseph de Reuilly (Capucin), 97. 
Joseph Manna Haddad (Greek priest, d. i860), 17. 
Joseph of Arimathea, 186. 
Joseph of Scete (abbot)", 103. 
Joseph, son of 'Abd al-'Aziz Kawand (copyist in 

1769), 22. 
Joseph, son of Ablahad (owner), 190. 
Joseph, son of George (Maronite priest in 171 1), 

21. 
Joseph, son of Jacob (Patriarch), 158. 
Joseph, son of Jamal ad-Din (copyist in 1578), 179. 
Joseph, son of John (copyist in 1481), 184. 
Joseph Zanbakah (copyist), 118. 
Joseph Zarri, 163. 
Judas Iscariot, 86. 
Jude, St., 177. 
Julian the Apostate, 160. 
Justin Martyr : 

Explanation of the Faith, 73. 

Third book on Theology, 73. 



K 



Karmanshah, 156. 
Kasih, Makardij, 116, 162. 
Kasim b. Habib, 55. 



Khawwanki, Ibrahim abu-Tabl (copyist in 1797), 

14- 
Khidr, son of Ilyas of Mosul, 153-157. 

Khurasan (Persian province), 145. 

Khuri Stephen, 9 (see also under Ilyas). 

Kirman (town), 145. 

Kufur (village), 184. 

Kulayil (Ibn), Sim'an, 115. 

Kurdistan, 7. 



Lamech, children of, 25. 

Lamy, T. J., 155- 

Language, works on, 159-160, 181. 

Lapide, Cornelius a (d. 1617), 21. 

Latin language, 9, 21, 33, 99, 100, 174, 177. 

Lazarus, 4. 

Lebanon, 82, 184. 

Lectionaries : 

Coptic, 10. 

East Syrian, 2-7. 
Leipzig, 89. 

Leontius of Coutances, St., 36. 
Leontius of Rome, St. (Pope), 36. 
Lewis, A. S., 122, 125. 
Liturgy : 

Of St. Basil (Euchologion), 29, 38. 

Of St. John Chrysostom, 38. 
Longinus (abbot), 103. 
Lot (abbot), 103. 
Lucius (abbot), 103. 
Lujit, 125. 



M 



Ma'ani, abu'l (see 'Aziz b. Sabta). 
Macarius (abbot), 66, 67, 103, 115. 
Macarius (Patriarch of Alexandria) : , 

Letter to John of Antioch, 52. 
Macarius b. Za'im (Patriarch), 85-89. 
Macarius of Patmos (headmaster), 89. 
Macarius Sadakah (bishop of Tyre), 94. 
Maccabees, 147. 
Macedonius (heretic), 63. 
Magi, 65. 
Magic, 159, 181. 
Makardij (see Kasih). 
Malabar, 174, 175, 177. 
Malati (priest-copyist in 1796), 21. 



GENERAL INDEX 



203 



Malkun (Ibn), Isho'-Yab (Metropolitan of Nisibin, 

d. 1256), 3. 
Ma'mun (Caliph), 188. 
Mansur, son of 'Abd al-Aziz (copyist), 170. 
Maps, 120, 151. 
Marcellus, or Marcellinus (correspondent of Athan- 

asius of Alexandria), 13. 
Mardin (town), 82, 143, 170. 
Mari (disciple), 143. 
Marinus (notary), 139. 
Mark (Coptic Patriarch in 1797), 14- 
Mark (copyist in 1876), 77. 
Mark Diadochus, 186. 
Mark, St. (bishop of Arethusa), 37. 
Mark the Egyptian (abbot), 69, 103. 
Mark the Evangelist, St., 8, 142. 
Maronite monks, rules of, 157. 
Maronites, 149. 
Martinianus, St., 36. 
Ma'riiniyah (village), 184. 
Marzuk (king of Babylon), 26. 
Mansur (priest-owner), 61. 
Mas'ad (see Nushu). 
Mas-Latrie, L. de, 2. 
Matran (see 'Abdallah b. Fadl). 
Matrona, St. (martyr, from Salonika), 37. 
Matthew (priest-copyist in 1880), 79. 
Matthew, St., 176. 

Matthew, son of Paul (copyist), 178, 180. 
Matthias, St., 176. 
Maxentius (Emperor), 133. 
Maximus, St., 69. 

On difficult passages of the Bible, 67. 

Mazenderan (Persian province), 145. 

Mecca, 139. 

Megathius (abbot), 103. 

Melchite Church (see Greek Church). 

Melchites, 64, 77, 79, 149. l8 5- 

Meletius II (Greek Patriarch), 139. 

Meletius of Antioch, St., 36. 

Menas, or Mennas, of Alexandria : Letter to John 
of Antioch, 53. 

Menologion (see Synaxarium). 

Messalians, 68. 

Metholigen (bishop of Rome), 46. 

Michael (archangel), 23, 29, 177. 

Michael (bishop of Asyut), 81. 

Michael (bishop of Damascus), 59. 

Michael (from Alkosh), 188. 

Michael (monk-copyist in 1884), 19. 

Michael (Patriarch of Constantinople), 83. 



Michael Abdallah, 157. 

Michael abu Murad (Greek Orthodox Shaikh), 134. 

Michael Arraj, 74. 

Michael Jamal, 73. 

Michael Joseph Bassal (owner), 96. 

Michael of Alexandria, 52. 

Michael Sabbagh, 93. 

Michael, son of Abraham (priest-copyist), 40. 

Michael, son of Antanios (owner), 139. 

Michael, son of David (from Damascus), 145. 

Michael, son of George (from Horns, reader in I77 ( j). 

129. 
Michael, son of George (from Mardin, copyist in 

1935). 82. 
Michael, son of George (from Tripoli, translator), 

145- 
Michael, son of Hanna Khun (copyist), 148. 

Michael, son of Hanna Zalali, 158. 

Michael, son of Khalil (copyist), 92. 

Michael, son of Khariif, 163. 

Migne, 13. 

Mikati, Ahmad b. Yusuf, 120. 

Minas (see Menas). 

Mingana, 9, 23, 24, 44, 4 6 > 47. Io8 > 12S > lSl - 

Mios (abbot), 103. 

Mir (village), 43. 

Miracles of : 

St. Basil of Caesarea, 135. 

St. George, 62. 

St. Simeon the Stylite, 137. 

the Virgin, 146, 187-188. 
Monastery (see Convent). 
Monasteries, East Syrian in Kurdistan, 7. 
Monophysites (see Jacobites). 
Montfaucon, 15. 
Moses, 6, 86. 
Moses (abbot), 103. 
Moses (poet-teacher), 158. 
Moses bar Kepha, 168, 169. 
Moses the Ethiopian (abbot), 172. 

Mosul, 99, 154. I 56, 174' l82< 

Muhammad the Conqueror (Sultan), 88. 

Mukaffa' (Ibn) (see Severus of Ushmunain). 

Munyati (see Elijah). 

Murad, Nicholas, son of Michael Kishk (reader), 

32. 
Murad, son of Luke Antanios (reader), 129. 
Musa of Baghdad (copyist in 1721), 156. 
Musa of Ras al-Ain, 144. 
Musa, son of Tashlak (priest in 1481), 184. 
Muslims, 62, yy, 80, 85, 87, 120. 



204 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



Mu'tamid (Caliph), 140. 
Muthues (abbot), 103. 



N 



Narsai, 11. 

Nathan (ascetic of the sixth century), 88. 

Nazareth, 83. 

Nebuchadnezzar, 24. 

Nestorians, 64, 77, 79, 86. 

Nestorius, 50, 51. 

Nicene Creed, n. 

Nicephorus, St. (Patriarch of Constantinople), 

36,83. 
Nicholas Fir'aun, 73. 
Nicholas Murad (see Murad). 
Nicholas Ra'd (copyist), 93. 
Nicholas, St., 91, 185. 
Nicholas, son of Antony (owner), 34. 
Nicholas, son of Joseph Jabbar (copyist in 1839), 37- 
Nicon (abbot), 103. 
Nikon (author), 66. 
Nikon, St. (martyr), 37. 
Nilus (abbot), 103. 
Nilus, St., 161. 
Ni'mah Kattit (owner), 134. 
Ni f mat-Allah, son of Ilyas Salamah (reader), 129. 
Ninevites, Fast of the, 4, 6, 10. 
Nistaron, or Nastir (abbot), 103. 
Nona, 188. 

Notitianus (sorcerer), 61. 
Nubians (Abyssinians), 64, 150. 
Numerian (Emperor), 60. 
Nuri, An tun (Antony) Habash (owner), 96. 
Nuri, Fath-Allah (owner), 96. 
Nuri, Na'um (owner), 96. 
Nushu, Mas'ad (Greek Orthodox writer), 57. 
Various works, 73-74. 



O 



Octoechus (Melchite), 31. 
Olympius (abbot), 104. 
Onesimus, St., 36. 
Or (abbot), 104. 
Ornaments. See Drawings. 



Pachomius (abbot), 115. 
Pamphilius, St. (martyr), 36. 



Parachisius (martyr), 37. 

Paradise of the Fathers, 115. 

Parthenius, St. (bishop of Lampsakon), 36. 

Passion Harmony, 170. 

Paul (monk in 1555), 171. 

Paul Rahib (bishop of Sidon) : Several treatises, 

61-62. 
Paul Rizk (owner), 61. 
Paul Sbath, 66, yy, 118. 
Paul the Apostle, St., 3, 17, 43, 65. 
Paul the Hermit (abbot), 33, 104. 
Pergamus (Emperor), 125, 131. 
Persia, 145. 

Peter and Paul, SS., 177. 
Peter (brother of St. Basil of Csesarea), 135. 
Peter Rassam (owner), 119. 
Peter, St., 3, 66, 86, 142. 

Apocryphal letter, 150. 
Peter, son of Deacon Shaba (owner), 13. 
Peter, son of Isaac Jesse ar-Rakit, 98. 
Pethion, St., 6. 
Pharaoh, 86. 
Pharisimus, 139. 
Philip, St., 176. 
Philotheus of Alexandria : Letter to Dionysius of 

Antioch, 53. 
Philoxenus of Mebbug, 169, 189. 
Phoculus, St. (bishop of Smyrna), 36. 
Photius, 107. 

Photius (bishop of Tyre), 86. 
Pisanthius (abbot), 104. 
Poemen (abbot), 103, 104. 
Poemen (ascetic of the sixth century), 88. 
Poetical pieces, 157, 158, 162, 163, 178-181. 
Polycarp of Smyrna, St., 36, 68. 
Polycarpus of Jerusalem, 104. 
Popes of Rome, 90. 
Porphyrius, St. (bishop of Gaza), 36. 
Porphyry (philosopher), 118. 
Portas (abbot), 104. 
Prayer-books, see Service-books. 
Prochorus (deacon), 60, 122, 130. 
Proclus of Constantinople : 

Letter to Armenia, 47. 

On the Annunciation, 47. 

On the Creed, 47. 

On the Incarnation, 47. 

On the Nativity, 47. 

On Thomas, 47. 
Procopius al-Banyasi, St., 36. 
Ptolemy, 120. 



GENERAL INDEX 



205 



Q 

Quadratus, St. (martyr), 36. 

Questions and answers, theological (anonymous), 
83-84, 98, 128. 

R 

Rabahiyah, Joseph (copyist in 1843), 38, 39. 

Rabbat (priest), 18. 

Rahib (see Paul). 

Ra'itah, Abu (see Ilabib). 

Rakkah (town), 134. 

Raphael (archangel), 23. 

Rhipsime, St. (holy woman), 66. 

Rituals (see also under Service-books) : 

Coptic, 26-28. 

East Syrian, 174, 176. 

Greek, 38. 

Greek Uniate, 34. 

Order of St. Antony the Great, 146. 

Roman Catholic, 99. 

Uniate Syrian Church of Malabar, India, 174- 
177. 
Rizk, George Khashshab (father of teacher George), 

i9» 56, 79. 81. 
Roman Catholic Church and Theology, 9, 41, 90-92, 

98, 100, 119, 146, 153, 154, 172, 174-177. 

188-189. 
Rome, 80, 99,_i42, 153, i54> I 56, 177- 
Ropolus (see Iwani). 
Royaumont (French Abb6), 147. 
Rufus, or Rufinus (abbot), 104. 
Rumely (province), 84. 
Rummanah (village), 183. 
Russia, 85. 



Saba, St., 68, 83. 

Sabinianus (bishop of Perrha), 86. 

Sabinus, St. (martyr), 36. 

Sabrisho' (E.S. monk), 7. 

Sa'd, Abu (poet), 158. 

Sadad (town), 82. 

Sadakiel (archangel), 23. 

Sadamanti, Peter : Various works, 80, 114-115. 

Sa'id b. Batrik, 139-140, 143. 

Sa'igh, Nicholas, 163. 

Sakilarius (see Ilyas). 

Sakizi, Baisius (bishop of Gaza), 85. 

Salatiel (archangel), 23. 



Saliba, son of John, 140-143. 

§alibi (poet), 158. 

Salih, Abu, 14, 30, 43, 115. 

Samaritan religion, 142. 

Samhiri, Julius Antony (W.S. Uniate Patriarch), 71. 

Samuel (copyist in 1598), 151. 

Samuel Kaukabi, 144. 

Sanutius of Alexandria: Letter to Dionysius of 

Antioch, 54. 
Sarah (abbess), 104. 
Sarmatas (abbot), 104. 
Sa'ud Kafif, or Rasi, 158. 
Saul (district), 65. 
Scete, 65, 115. 
Sebaste, the Forty Martyrs of, 4, 10, 36, 87, 138, 

178. 
Sebastus of Trebizonde, 92. 
Seert, or Si'irt (town), 190. 
Segneri, P., 97. 
Septuagint, 12. 
Serapion (abbot), 104. 
Sermons (see Homilies). 
Service-books : 

Coptic, 29-30. 
East Syrian, 11. 
Greek, 31, 35, 38-39- 
Greek Melchite, 183-187. 
Greek Uniate, 30-31, 32-35, 37, 39, 40. 
Roman Catholic, 41. 
West Syrian, 7, 188-190. 
Seth, children of, 25. 
Severianus of Gabala : 

Correspondent of Hippolytus of Rome, 47. 
Works quoted, 47. 
Severius (W.S. Metropolitan), 162. 
Severus (correspondent of Cyril of Alexandria), 49. 
Severus of Antioch, 169. 

Commentaries on the Gospels, 51, 170. 
Discourse before the Emperor, 51. 
Letter to the Emperor, 52. 
Letter to John of Alexandria, 52. 
Letter to Julian of Halicarnassus, 51. 
Letter to Theodosius of Alexandria, 52. 
Profession of Faith, 51. 
Severus of Ushmunain, abu Bishr Ibn al-Mukaffa', 

75-76, 149-150. 
Shajjadah, son of Ilyas (copyist), 139- 
Shalabi, Joseph (copyist), 75. 
Shaikh al-Hadid, 105. 
Shenudah, or Shenudi (abbot), 115, 189. 
Shenudah (copyist), 56. 



206 



CHRISTIAN ARABIC MSS. 



Shim'un (Metropolitan of Amed), 7. 

Shim'un (E.S. priest, d. 1724), 154. 

Shirwan (town), 145. 

Shukrallah, Shadyak (copyist in 1735), 18. 

Sidah (nun), 179. 

Sidon, 62. 

Sim'an b. Kulayil (see Kulayil), 115-116. 

Sim'an b. Musa (copyist), 158. 

Simawun (priest-copyist), 160. 

Simeon the Stylite, St., 69, 87, 137, 189. 

Simon (abbot), 104. 

Simon (bishop of Saidnaye), 184. 

Simon (bishop of Salonika), 86. 

Simon (owner in 1586), 184. 

Simon of Nisibin, 144. 

Simon, St., 177. 

Simon the Recluse : Prayers by, 33, 34. 

Simon the Theologian, 33. 

Sisoes (abbot), 104. 

Solomon, son of Sim'an Tammam (copyist), 148. 

Songs (see Canticles). 

Sophronius of Constantinople, 73. 

Sophronius, St. (Patriarch of Jerusalem), 36. 

Stephen (Maronite priest), 157. 

Stephen Hakim (owner), 95. 

Stephen of Jazirah (priest in 1825), 82. 

Stephen Protomartyr, St., 3, 60, 122, 130, 176. 

Story of (see also under " History of ") : 

a Jew who had cattle and sheep, 173. 

a king who went to the valley of Sarandib, 

133. 
a man and his black slave, 127. 

a man and his wife, 128, 132. 

a man who was raised from the dead, 127, 131. 

a pagan to whom the Virgin appeared, 173. 

a priest and a dying widow, 128, 132. 

a rich man of Rome who became poor, 173. 

a Roman citizen, and his wife who was devoted 

to the Virgin, 127, 131. 
a Roman lady who had intercourse with her 

son, 127, 132. 
a young Christian killed by Jews, 128, 132. 
an Indian girl in 1590, 188. 
an Italian girl, 127. 

Gallienus, an army officer in Antioch, 173. 
Mary, the daughter of the king of the Franks, 

127, 131. 
the apple and the Gospels, 169. 
the Arab tribe of the Jibaliyah, 134. 
the majordomo of a monastery, 128, 132. 
the Virgin (14 stories), 187. 



Succensus (correspondent of Cyril of Alexandria), 

Suez, 34. 

Sulaiman (priest-poet), 157. 

Sulaiman of Mosul (priest), 99. 

Suriel (archangel), 23, 66. 

Suriyah (town), 124, 130. 

Suriir, Abu, 62. 

Sylvanus (abbot), 104. 

Sylvester of Rome : Treatise against the Jews, 47. 

Synaxarium : 

Greek, 35, 39. 

Greek Uniate, 32, 35, 40. 

Syrian Jacobite, 105. 
Syncletica (virgin and teacher), 104. 
Synod (see Council). 
Syria, 82. 

Syriac, 2, 3, 6, 7, II, 18, 22, 25, 106, 107, 108, 167- 
190. 

Numerals, 99, 105. 



Tabniiti, Bisharah (copyist), 116. 

Tabriz, 156. 

Tarabulusi (see Elias). 

Tarasius, St. (archbishop of Constantinople), 36. 

Tayib (Ibn), 'Abdallah abu'l-Faraj (commentator 

and translator, d. 1043), 3, 20, 150. 
Theodolus, 161. 
Theodora (abbess), 102. 
Theodore of Antinoe, 102. 
Theodore of Parme (abbot), 102. 
Theodore of Scete (abbot), 102. 
Theodore Studita, 68. 
Theodore the General, St., 36. 
Theodoret (historian), 87. 
Theodorus the Tiro, St. (martyr), 36. 
Theodosi (ascetic), 88. 

Theodosius (ascetic of the sixth century), 88. 
Theodosius (Emperor), 50. 
Theodosius (teacher), 94. 
Theodosius of Alexandria : 

Discourse on the Trinity, 51. 

Letter to people of Alexandria, 51, 55. 

Letter to Severus of Antioch, 51, 52. 

Quoted, 67. 
Theodosius of Antioch : Letter to Michael of 

Alexandria, 52. 
Theodosius the Younger, 105. 
Theodotus (abbot), 102. 



GENERAL INDEX 



207 



Theodotus (bishop of Ancyra) : Discourse on the 

Nativity, 48. 
Theodotus', St. (bishop of Cyrenia, martyr), 36. 
Theophanes the Severan, St., 36. 
Theophilactus, St. (bishop of Nicomedia), 36. 
Theophilus of Alexandria, 102. 

Discourse on Faith, 49. 

Heretistica, 49. 

Letter to bishops of Egypt, 73. 

Vision of, 23. 
Thomas (translator from Latin into Syriac), 175- 
Thomas Luke (owner)., 119. 
Thomas of Mosul (monk-copyist), 172. 
Thomas, Sadakah (copyist), 88. 
Thomas, St. (the Apostle), 90, 176. 
Thomas, son of Basil Shakrah (reader), 129. 
Tiflis (town), 156. 
Tigris (river), 174. 
Timaeus of Antioch, 55. 
Timotheus al-Anasimpoli, St., 36. 
Timothy (abbot), 104. 
Timothy (bishop of Jerusalem), 54. 
Timothy (disciple of St. Paul) : 

Correspondent of Dionysius the Areopagite, 
44, 128. 
Timothy 'Isa (bishop in 1728), 172. 
Tithoes (abbot), 104. 

Tripoli, or Tarabulus (town), 35, 93, 158, 162, 184. 
Tiikhi, Raphael abu Salamah (Coptic deacon in 

1797). *4- 
Tur 'Abdin, 170, 181. 
Turkish language, 145. 
Tuwaisah (see Gabriel Mar j an). 



V 



w 



Vatican, the, 122, 149, 156. 

Venice, 89. 

Victor (see Buktur). 



Walsh, R., 177. 
Wright, W., 19, 121. 
Wiistenfeld, F., 2. 



X 



Xonus (abbot), 104. 



Yahb-Alaha III (E.S. Patriarch), 143. 

Yahya b. 'Adi, 55. 

Yahya b. Sa'id, 140. 

Yahya Iskandarani, or 'Askalani, 120. 

Yaunan, son of George (copyist), 71. 

Yiisab (bishop of Akhmim), 114. 



Zahlah (town), 82. 

Zaidan, Ilyas (copyist in 1865), 39- 

Zandah, Michael, 18. 

Zacharias the Prophet, St., 36, 37, 137- 

Zaz (village), 170. 

Zechariah Kaphartuthi (historian), 144. 

Zechariah of Alexandria, 53. 

Letter to John of Antioch, 54. 
Zechariah, son of Francis Khursan (copyist), 97. 
Zenon (abbot), 102. 
Zoroastrianism, 80. 
Zuk (village), 163. 



LIST OF THE DATED AND UNDATED MANUSCRIPTS WRITTEN BEFORE a.d. 1798 



No. of 




Date of 


Dated or 


No. of 




Date of 


Dated or 


No. of 




Date of 


Dated or 


MS. 


Page. 


Manuscript. 


Undated. 


MS. 


Page. 


Manuscript. 


Undated. 


MS. 


Page. 


Manuscript. 


Undated. 


91 


122 


830 


undated 


3 


7 


1650 


undated 


97 


140 


1750 


undated 


43 


58 


880 


undated 


19 


24 


1650 


undated 


5 


10 


1754 


dated 


76 


105 


950 


undated 


26 


32 


1650 


undated 


40 


43 


1756 


dated 


44 


62 


1255 


dated 


18 


23 


1670 


undated 


80 


113 


1756 


dated 


1 


I 


I27O 


dated 


4 


9 


1680 


undated 


in 


157 


1760 


dated 


22 


28 


1308 


dated 


8 


12 


1691 


dated 


28 


34 


1760 


undated 


79 


110 


1350 


undated 


85 


117 


1693 


dated. 


47 


69 


I760 


undated 


83 


Il6 


I380 


undated 


38 


4i 


1696 


dated 


117 


163 


1760 


undated 


7 


II 


I400 


undated 


21 


26 


1700 


undated 


58 


83 


I766 


dated 


78 


IO9 


1450 


undated 


92 


129 


I7OO 


undated 


88 


118 


1770 . 


undated 


80 


113 


1450 


undated 


622 S. 


190 


1702 


dated 


108 


152 


1770 


undated 


5i 


76 


I480 


undated 


66 


96 


1715 


dated 


60 


88 


1771 


dated 


617 S. 


184 


I481 


dated 


no 


154 


1725 


dated 


94 


134 


1773 


dated 


619 s. 


187 


149O 


undated 


608 S. 


172 


1728 


dated 


23 


29 


I780 


undated 


614 s. 


l8l 


1500 


undated 


621 S. 


189 


1730 


undated 


29 


34 


I780 


undated 


618 s. 


186 


1500 


undated 


17 


22 


1730 


undated 


59 


85 


I780 


undated 


25 


31 


1538 


dated 


84 


116 


1732 


dated 


. 93 


133 


1780 


undated 


58 


83 


1550 


undated 


no 


154 


1734 


dated 


620 S. 


188 


I780 


undated 


95 


137 


1550 


undated 


104 


148 


1739 


dated 


118 


163 


1781 


dated 


609 S. 


174 


1550 


undated 


65 


96 


I74O 


undated 


9 


13 


I79O 


undated 


611 s. 


177 


1550 


undated 


62 


93 


1745 


dated 


42 


57 


• 1790 


undated 


116 


l6l 


1551 


dated 


120 


164 


I749 


dated 


90 


120 


1790 


undated 


607 s. 


170 


1555 


dated 


27 


33 


1750 


undated 


115 


160 


1790 


undated 


107 


151 


1598 


dated 


55 


80 


1750 


undated 


116 


161 


1790 


undated 


92 


129 


l600 


undated 


68 


97 


1750 


undated 


15 


21 


1796 


dated 


614 s. 


l8l 


l600 


undated 


86 


117 


1750 


undated 


10 


14 


1797 


dated 


96 


139 


1643 


dated 


90 


120 


1750 


undated 











and 



1190 
1202 
1225 
ii95 



Lines. 

9-10 

25-26 



18-19 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA 

from Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of Manuscripts, Vol. I, SYRIAC MSS. 

for read 

16-48 1-2, 486 

Hierotheus, Bishop of Eden Irenaeus, Bishop 

of Lugdunum 
(corrected in the present catalogue, p. 44) 

end beginning 

(corrected in my Book of Treasures, p. xxii) 

'Abdisho' II 'Abdisho' I 
and 

1090 986 

(corrected in my Woodbrooke Studies, Vol. VII, p. 145) 

Agbar Abgar 

Habitu Habitun 

(cf. Evetts, The Churches and Monasteries of Egypt, p. 322) 

Habatwa Habitun 

932 
13 



Page. 
166 
886 



IO36 

1158 

1175 

1 186 
H89 




33 
9 



1233 



13 

21 

23 

15 

16 

49 



392 
12 

after Elijah, add John 
at the end add 1134 
after 918, add 1104 



PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, ABERDEEN